Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, 1950-75.

By: McKinley, Maggie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015Description: 1 online resource (217 p.).ISBN: 9781628924909.Subject(s): American fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | American fiction -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Masculinity in literature | Violence in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, 1950-75DDC classification: 808.10923489 LOC classification: PS374.D4 .M384 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-Title; Title; Imprints; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Gendered Crises, Gendered Violence; 1 Multiple Masculinities and the Momentum of Violence in Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man; 2 Existentialism, Violence, and Racial Identity: The Shape of Masculinity in Richard Wright's The Outsider and The Long Dream; 3 Violent Liberation and Racialized Masculinities: Norman Mailer's "The White Negro" and An American Dream; 4 From Herzog to Sammler: Saul Bellow's Meditations on Masculinity, Modernity, and Violence
5 Desire, Violence, and Masculine Anxiety in Baldwin's Giovanni's Room and Another Country6 "A grueling and gratifying ethical life": Manhood, Morality, and Violence in Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint and My Life as; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, 1950-75 explores the intersections of violence, masculinity, and racial and ethnic tension in America as it is depicted in the fiction of Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Norman Mailer, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth. Maggie McKinley reconsiders the longstanding association between masculinity and violence, locating a problematic paradox within works by these writers: as each author figures violence as central to the establishment of a liberated masculine identity, the use of this violence often reaffirms many constric
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.D4 .M384 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1990694 Available EBL1990694

Cover; Half-Title; Title; Imprints; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Gendered Crises, Gendered Violence; 1 Multiple Masculinities and the Momentum of Violence in Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man; 2 Existentialism, Violence, and Racial Identity: The Shape of Masculinity in Richard Wright's The Outsider and The Long Dream; 3 Violent Liberation and Racialized Masculinities: Norman Mailer's "The White Negro" and An American Dream; 4 From Herzog to Sammler: Saul Bellow's Meditations on Masculinity, Modernity, and Violence

5 Desire, Violence, and Masculine Anxiety in Baldwin's Giovanni's Room and Another Country6 "A grueling and gratifying ethical life": Manhood, Morality, and Violence in Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint and My Life as; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Masculinity and the Paradox of Violence in American Fiction, 1950-75 explores the intersections of violence, masculinity, and racial and ethnic tension in America as it is depicted in the fiction of Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Norman Mailer, Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth. Maggie McKinley reconsiders the longstanding association between masculinity and violence, locating a problematic paradox within works by these writers: as each author figures violence as central to the establishment of a liberated masculine identity, the use of this violence often reaffirms many constric

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Maggie McKinley is Assistant Professor of English at Harper College, USA, where she teaches courses in American Literature.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.