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Religion in Hip Hop : Mapping the New Terrain in the US

By: Miller, Monica R.
Contributor(s): Pinn, Anthony B | Freeman, Bernard 'Bun B'.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Bloomsbury Studies in Religion and Popular Music: Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015Description: 1 online resource (297 p.).ISBN: 9781472506016.Subject(s): African Americans -- Social conditions -- 1975- | Rap (Music) -- Religious aspects | Rap (Music) -- Social aspects -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Religion in Hip Hop : Mapping the New Terrain in the USDDC classification: 782.421649/112 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustration; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Preface; Turning nothing into something is God Work': Holiness and hurt in the hood; Introduction: Context and other considerations; "Home" in the academy; Studying hip hop/hip hop studies; What's the purpose?; Structuring the book; Part 1 Hip hop on ­religion as/for the embodied self; Chapter 1 Searching for self: Religion and the creative quest for self in the art of Erykah Badu; The religious evolution of Erykah Badu; Creating selves: Case study analysis of New Amerykah Part Two (The Return of the Ankh)
Chapter 2 Methods for the prophetic: Tupac Shakur, Lauryn Hill, and the case for ethnolifehistoryWhat is "Ethnolifehistory?" ; Remembering life, after death: Tupac and the construction of life meaning; The military mind era: Opposition and the making of a spiritual mind; The criminal grind era: The construction of the street mind; The ghetto is destiny era: Constructing a pathway for change; The outlaw era: The defining of a reputation; Lauryn Hill: Exploring an enigmatic era; Implications & the future of ethnolifehistory
Chapter 3 Existentialist transvaluation and hip hop's syncretic religiosityLaying the groundwork: Hip hop's altered ethic; Tupac Shakur: Lyrical blasphemy, relational reimagining; Jay-Hova and yeezus: The new breed of Hip Hop prophets; "Take 'em to Church": A rejoinder between tradition and hip hop; Hip hop's horizon for the future: Community against cultural capitalism ; Chapter 4 God complex, complex gods, or God's complex: Jay-Z, poor black youth, and making "The Struggle" divine1; Introduction: Jay-Z and the manipulation of the black rhetorical tradition
God on the mic: Jay-Z and lyrical styling Religion and the popular: Jay-Z and god complexes ; Jay-Z and making the struggle of the people divine; Spiritual or religious?: Jay-Z, and "Nailing Down" the cosmic consciousness of rhetoric; Conclusion: Jay-Z, America, and the precarity of  "Contradiction"; Part 2 Hip hop on religion and the "Other"; Chapter 5 A PARTICULAR PAC: Ontological ruptures and the posthumous presence of Tupac Shakur; A virtually illicit autopsy photograph; Pac's God consciousness; Tupac's last words; Tupac is still alive; Virtual-spiritual immortality
Chapter 6 #NOWTHATSRELIGIONANDHIPHOP: Mapping the terrain of religion and hip hop in cyberspaceReligion in hip hop on the internet: Stakeholders and sources; A new approach: Getting "Critical" with religion in/and hip hop scholarship; Authority, authenticity, and religion in hip hop on YouTube; "Yeezianity": Media market maintenance or online humanism? ; Yeezianity in online news media; Presentation of the virtual self-Yeezianity and Ye'ciples online identity construction; So, what is Yeezianity, then?; Studying religion in hip hop in cyberspace: New times, new methods
Chapter 7 Mapping space and place in the analysis of hip hop and religion: Houston as an example
Summary: Now a global and transnational phenomenon, hip hop culture continues to affect and be affected by the institutional, cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of American society and beyond. Over the past two decades, numerous disciplines have taken up hip hop culture for its intellectual weight and contributions to the cultural life and self-understanding of the United States. More recently, the academic study of religion has given hip hop culture closer and more critical attention, yet this conversation is often limited to discussions of hip hop and traditional understand
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML3921.8.R36 R45 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1990779 Available EBL1990779

Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustration; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Preface; Turning nothing into something is God Work': Holiness and hurt in the hood; Introduction: Context and other considerations; "Home" in the academy; Studying hip hop/hip hop studies; What's the purpose?; Structuring the book; Part 1 Hip hop on ­religion as/for the embodied self; Chapter 1 Searching for self: Religion and the creative quest for self in the art of Erykah Badu; The religious evolution of Erykah Badu; Creating selves: Case study analysis of New Amerykah Part Two (The Return of the Ankh)

Chapter 2 Methods for the prophetic: Tupac Shakur, Lauryn Hill, and the case for ethnolifehistoryWhat is "Ethnolifehistory?" ; Remembering life, after death: Tupac and the construction of life meaning; The military mind era: Opposition and the making of a spiritual mind; The criminal grind era: The construction of the street mind; The ghetto is destiny era: Constructing a pathway for change; The outlaw era: The defining of a reputation; Lauryn Hill: Exploring an enigmatic era; Implications & the future of ethnolifehistory

Chapter 3 Existentialist transvaluation and hip hop's syncretic religiosityLaying the groundwork: Hip hop's altered ethic; Tupac Shakur: Lyrical blasphemy, relational reimagining; Jay-Hova and yeezus: The new breed of Hip Hop prophets; "Take 'em to Church": A rejoinder between tradition and hip hop; Hip hop's horizon for the future: Community against cultural capitalism ; Chapter 4 God complex, complex gods, or God's complex: Jay-Z, poor black youth, and making "The Struggle" divine1; Introduction: Jay-Z and the manipulation of the black rhetorical tradition

God on the mic: Jay-Z and lyrical styling Religion and the popular: Jay-Z and god complexes ; Jay-Z and making the struggle of the people divine; Spiritual or religious?: Jay-Z, and "Nailing Down" the cosmic consciousness of rhetoric; Conclusion: Jay-Z, America, and the precarity of  "Contradiction"; Part 2 Hip hop on religion and the "Other"; Chapter 5 A PARTICULAR PAC: Ontological ruptures and the posthumous presence of Tupac Shakur; A virtually illicit autopsy photograph; Pac's God consciousness; Tupac's last words; Tupac is still alive; Virtual-spiritual immortality

Chapter 6 #NOWTHATSRELIGIONANDHIPHOP: Mapping the terrain of religion and hip hop in cyberspaceReligion in hip hop on the internet: Stakeholders and sources; A new approach: Getting "Critical" with religion in/and hip hop scholarship; Authority, authenticity, and religion in hip hop on YouTube; "Yeezianity": Media market maintenance or online humanism? ; Yeezianity in online news media; Presentation of the virtual self-Yeezianity and Ye'ciples online identity construction; So, what is Yeezianity, then?; Studying religion in hip hop in cyberspace: New times, new methods

Chapter 7 Mapping space and place in the analysis of hip hop and religion: Houston as an example

Now a global and transnational phenomenon, hip hop culture continues to affect and be affected by the institutional, cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of American society and beyond. Over the past two decades, numerous disciplines have taken up hip hop culture for its intellectual weight and contributions to the cultural life and self-understanding of the United States. More recently, the academic study of religion has given hip hop culture closer and more critical attention, yet this conversation is often limited to discussions of hip hop and traditional understand

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Monica R. Miller is Assistant Professor of Religion & Africana Studies, Director of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Lehigh University, USA. Anthony B. Pinn is Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, Professor of Religious Studies, and Director of the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL) at Rice University, USA. Bernard "Bun B" Freeman is an American rapper, songwriter and CERCL Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at Rice University, USA .

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