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Shakespeare and the Just War Tradition.

By: Pugliatti, Paola, Professor.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Farnham : Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2013Description: 1 online resource (261 p.).ISBN: 9780754699644.Subject(s): Military history in literature | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Knowledge -- History, Military | War in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Shakespeare and the Just War TraditionDDC classification: 822.33 | 822.3'3 LOC classification: PR3069.W37 P84 2010PR3069.W37P84 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations and Documentation; Introduction; PART ONE ETHICS AND WARFARE: THE JUST WAR TRADITION IN EUROPE; 1 Christianity and the Ethics of Warfare; 1.1 Augustine: War Ethics and the Roman Empire; 1.2 The First Systematization of Canon Law: Gratian; 1.3 Aquinas: Violence Public and Private; 2 The Lay Tradition; 2.1 John of Legnano; 2.2 Honoré Bouvet; 2.3 Christine de Pisan; 2.4 Alberico Gentili; 3 The 'Pacifist' Tradition; 3.1 The Humanist Pacifists: More, Erasmus and Vives; PART TWO THEATRES OF WAR: OFFSTAGE AND ONSTAGE; 4 Elizabetha Triumphans
4.1 'The Cause is Thine': War and Conquest in God's Name4.2 Defence or Aggression? The Pressure of Perpetual War; 4.3 Crisis; 4.4 On the Stage; 5 Marlowe et alii; 5.1 The Extremities of War: Papists, Mahometans and Other Infidels; 5.2 Civil Wars; 5.3 War and National History; 5.4 Sedition and Riot; 6 Closer to Shakespeare; 6.1 The Just War in Contemporary Tracts and Manuals; PART THREE SHAKESPEARE ON WAR AND PEACE; 7 The Temper of War and Peace; 7.1 The Blessings of Peace, the Evils of War; 8 Ius ad bellum; 8.1 Beginnings and Declarations of War; 8.2 Causes Just and Unjust
8.3 Succession and Civil War8.4 Aggression and Defence; 8.5 Rebellion; 8.6 Revenge; 8.7 Killing the Tyrant; 8.8 Just, Holy, Religious; 9 Ius in bello; 9.1 Before the Battle; 9.2 War Leaders; 9.3 Common Soldiers; 9.4 Honour and Cowardice; 9.5 The Legacy of Chivalry; PART FOUR HENRY V AND THE WARS OF OUR TIME; 10 The Just War of Henry V; 10.1 Old and New: a Moral View of War?; 10.2 The Just Conquest of Henry V and its Appropriations; 10.3 Further Appropriations: The Jurists' Point of View; 10.4 The falsification of the causa belli; 10.5 The Defence of Cultural Values; 10.6 Responsibility
10.7 Proportionality and Discrimination10.8 God's Hand and the Empire; Works Cited; Index
Summary: Brought to light in this study is a connection between the treatment of war in Shakespeare's plays, and the issue of the 'just war', which loomed large both in religious and in lay treatises of Shakespeare's time. The book re-reads Shakespeare's representations of war in light of both the changing historical and political contexts in which they were produced; and of Shakespeare's possible connection with the culture and ideology of the European just war tradition.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PR3069.W37 P84 2010 | PR3069.W37P84 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=513951 Available EBL513951

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations and Documentation; Introduction; PART ONE ETHICS AND WARFARE: THE JUST WAR TRADITION IN EUROPE; 1 Christianity and the Ethics of Warfare; 1.1 Augustine: War Ethics and the Roman Empire; 1.2 The First Systematization of Canon Law: Gratian; 1.3 Aquinas: Violence Public and Private; 2 The Lay Tradition; 2.1 John of Legnano; 2.2 Honoré Bouvet; 2.3 Christine de Pisan; 2.4 Alberico Gentili; 3 The 'Pacifist' Tradition; 3.1 The Humanist Pacifists: More, Erasmus and Vives; PART TWO THEATRES OF WAR: OFFSTAGE AND ONSTAGE; 4 Elizabetha Triumphans

4.1 'The Cause is Thine': War and Conquest in God's Name4.2 Defence or Aggression? The Pressure of Perpetual War; 4.3 Crisis; 4.4 On the Stage; 5 Marlowe et alii; 5.1 The Extremities of War: Papists, Mahometans and Other Infidels; 5.2 Civil Wars; 5.3 War and National History; 5.4 Sedition and Riot; 6 Closer to Shakespeare; 6.1 The Just War in Contemporary Tracts and Manuals; PART THREE SHAKESPEARE ON WAR AND PEACE; 7 The Temper of War and Peace; 7.1 The Blessings of Peace, the Evils of War; 8 Ius ad bellum; 8.1 Beginnings and Declarations of War; 8.2 Causes Just and Unjust

8.3 Succession and Civil War8.4 Aggression and Defence; 8.5 Rebellion; 8.6 Revenge; 8.7 Killing the Tyrant; 8.8 Just, Holy, Religious; 9 Ius in bello; 9.1 Before the Battle; 9.2 War Leaders; 9.3 Common Soldiers; 9.4 Honour and Cowardice; 9.5 The Legacy of Chivalry; PART FOUR HENRY V AND THE WARS OF OUR TIME; 10 The Just War of Henry V; 10.1 Old and New: a Moral View of War?; 10.2 The Just Conquest of Henry V and its Appropriations; 10.3 Further Appropriations: The Jurists' Point of View; 10.4 The falsification of the causa belli; 10.5 The Defence of Cultural Values; 10.6 Responsibility

10.7 Proportionality and Discrimination10.8 God's Hand and the Empire; Works Cited; Index

Brought to light in this study is a connection between the treatment of war in Shakespeare's plays, and the issue of the 'just war', which loomed large both in religious and in lay treatises of Shakespeare's time. The book re-reads Shakespeare's representations of war in light of both the changing historical and political contexts in which they were produced; and of Shakespeare's possible connection with the culture and ideology of the European just war tradition.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pugliatti (Univ. of Florence, Italy) asks the reader to work through various testimonies regarding a "just war doctrine" but undermines the exposition with careless quotation, incomprehensible syntax, idiosyncrasy of punctuation and citation form, and typographical errors. She largely ignores Greek influence and, though she mentions Shakespeare often, accords more emphasis to minor authors. In the final chapter, she represents Henry V as a live, unethical general. Pugliatti presents an ambivalent perspective, as she makes an absolutist attitude to war the foundation of a relativistic critique of George W. Bush's military response to the terrorism of 9/11. Her views on the just war theory suggest a simplistic approach that might actually be appropriate for some instances of American belligerence; however, thanks to her unfocused rhetoric, one has little basis for fair judgment of her insight. Pugliatti's anti-imperialist preoccupations emerge in footnotes to her discussion of Henry V. This is not quality intellectual activity, on the part of either the author or the publisher. Summing Up: Not recommended. R. W. Haynes Texas A&M International University

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