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England's Wars of Religion, Revisited.

By: Burgess, Glenn, Professor.
Contributor(s): Prior, Charles W A, Dr.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Farnham : Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2013Description: 1 online resource (350 p.).ISBN: 9781409419747.Subject(s): Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649 -- Historiography | Great Britain -- History -- Commonwealth and Protectorate, 1649-1660 -- Historiography | Great Britain -- History -- Puritan Revolution, 1642-1660 -- Historiography | Political science --Great Britain --History --17th century | Religion and politics --England --History --17th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: England's Wars of Religion, RevisitedDDC classification: 941.06/30072 | 942.062 | 942'.062 LOC classification: DA403 .E54 2011DA403.E54 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Notes on Contributors; Preface; 1 Introduction: Religion and the Historiography of the English Civil War; 2 Sacred Kingship in France and England in the Age of the Wars of Religion; 3 The Continental Counter-Reformation and the Plausibility of the Popish Plots, 1638-1642; 4 The Mind of William Laud; 5 Cannons and Constitutions; 6 Prayer Book and Protestation; 7 Sir Simonds D'Ewes: A 'respectable conservative' or a 'fiery spirit'?; 8 Wars of Religion and Royalist Political Thought; 9 Natural Law and Holy War in the English Revolution
10 Oliver Cromwell on Religion and Resistance11 Oliver Cromwell and the Cause of Civil and Religious Liberty; 12 England's Exodus: The Civil War as a War of Deliverance; 13 Restoration Anti-Catholicism: A Prejudice in Motion; 14 Renaming England's Wars of Religion; Index
Summary: In this collection, leading scholars address John Morrill's suggestion the constitutional conflict that wracked the British Isles in the mid-seventeenth century was fuelled primarily by religious beliefs, rather than secular political ideas. The essays revisit concepts of the culture of allegiance, looking at what motivated minorities to fight, whilst emphasising the many elements of fundamental agreement that existed between the warring factions.
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DA403 .E54 2011 | DA403.E54 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=714111 Available EBL714111

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Notes on Contributors; Preface; 1 Introduction: Religion and the Historiography of the English Civil War; 2 Sacred Kingship in France and England in the Age of the Wars of Religion; 3 The Continental Counter-Reformation and the Plausibility of the Popish Plots, 1638-1642; 4 The Mind of William Laud; 5 Cannons and Constitutions; 6 Prayer Book and Protestation; 7 Sir Simonds D'Ewes: A 'respectable conservative' or a 'fiery spirit'?; 8 Wars of Religion and Royalist Political Thought; 9 Natural Law and Holy War in the English Revolution

10 Oliver Cromwell on Religion and Resistance11 Oliver Cromwell and the Cause of Civil and Religious Liberty; 12 England's Exodus: The Civil War as a War of Deliverance; 13 Restoration Anti-Catholicism: A Prejudice in Motion; 14 Renaming England's Wars of Religion; Index

In this collection, leading scholars address John Morrill's suggestion the constitutional conflict that wracked the British Isles in the mid-seventeenth century was fuelled primarily by religious beliefs, rather than secular political ideas. The essays revisit concepts of the culture of allegiance, looking at what motivated minorities to fight, whilst emphasising the many elements of fundamental agreement that existed between the warring factions.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

John Morrill claims the war that broke out between Charles I and his subjects in 1642 "was not the first European revolution: it was the last of the Wars of Religion." The authors in this book (originating in a 2008 symposium) take this no longer controversial statement as their point of departure. The essay that opens this volume examines how the "master narrative of the English Revolution" has evolved since the 17th century; until recently, historians understood the struggle as an effort to preserve civil liberty, but one that used a religious idiom to express a revolutionary ideology (pace Christopher Hill). Each contributor rejects positivism, believing one must take seriously the religious language and discourse of the time. Essays are devoted to the attitudes and mental furniture of characters as different as Sir Simonds D'Ewes and William Laud, while two others deal with Oliver Cromwell. Blair Worden's essay shows how concerns about the rights of subjects in the 1640s ("civil liberty") conjoined with "liberty of conscience" during the Protectorate to produce a new ideal: "civil and religious liberty" (the grail of Whigs for the next two centuries). Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. D. R. Bisson Belmont University

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