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Brown girl dreaming / Jacqueline Woodson.

By: Woodson, Jacqueline [author.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: 336 pages : illustrations, genealogical tables ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780399252518; 0399252517.Subject(s): Woodson, Jacqueline -- Biography | Woodson, Jacqueline -- Juvenile poetry | African American women authors -- Biography -- Juvenile poetry | Identity (Psychology) in children -- Juvenile poetry | Identity (Psychology) in children -- Biography | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile poetry | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century -- Biography | Children -- Books and reading -- Juvenile poetry | Children -- Books and reading -- Biography | United States -- Social conditions -- 1960-1980 -- Juvenile poetry | United States -- Social conditions -- 1960-1980 -- BiographyDDC classification: 811.54 Other classification: JNF007030 | JNF007120 | JNF053140 Online resources: Cover image
Contents:
Family Tree. Part I: I Am Born -- Part II: The Stories Of South Carolina Run Like Rivers -- Part III: Followed The Sky's Mirrored Constellation To Freedom -- Part IV: Deep In My Heart, I Do Believe -- Part V: Ready To Change The World. Author's Note -- Thankfuls -- Family Photos.
Awards: National Book Award Winner, Young People's Literature, 2014 | Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner, 2015 | Newbery Honor, 2015Summary: Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child's soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson's poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.
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CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
811.54 W8946br (Browse shelf) Available 0000002072619

Family Tree. Part I: I Am Born -- Part II: The Stories Of South Carolina Run Like Rivers -- Part III: Followed The Sky's Mirrored Constellation To Freedom -- Part IV: Deep In My Heart, I Do Believe -- Part V: Ready To Change The World. Author's Note -- Thankfuls -- Family Photos.

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child's soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson's poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

Grades 5-8.

National Book Award Winner, Young People's Literature, 2014

Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner, 2015

Newbery Honor, 2015

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-Free verse is an effective writing style for describing dreams. Woodson's text is particularly compelling when detailing the small moments of life, such as the "Saturday night smells of biscuits and burning hair" or bemoaning the "hair ribbons that anchor (her) to childhood." And while poetry is sometimes difficult to follow on audio, this author is a masterful narrator. The sounds of the words and the rhythm expressed by her thoughtful intonation, careful pacing, and deliberate emphasis make clear the poetic form: "a country caught" (sharp c's and t, pause) "between black and white." Themes include the iconic search for identity in changing times: for example, Woodson's Southern cousins say she speaks too quickly, while in New York, "coming back home isn't really coming back home at all." Yet throughout her interestingly complicated childhood, young Jackie tells stories until she grows to understand that "stories are like air to me and I know now that words are.my brilliance." A personal memoir and a child's eye view of the nascent civil rights movement, this work confirms Woodson's brilliance as a writer for children and for adults, too.-Toby Rajput, National Louis University, Skokie, IL (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jacqueline Woodson was born in Columbus, Ohio on February 12, 1963. She received a B.A. in English from Adelphi University in 1985. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a drama therapist for runaways and homeless children in New York City. Her books include The House You Pass on the Way, I Hadn't Meant to Tell You This, Lena, and The Day You Begin. She won the Coretta Scott King Award in 2001 for Miracle's Boys. After Tupac and D Foster, Feathers, and Show Way won Newbery Honors. Brown Girl Dreaming won the E. B. White Read-Aloud Award in 2015. Her other awards include the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the 2018 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award. She was also selected as the Young People's Poet Laureate in 2015 by the Poetry Foundation. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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