Fellow Tribesmen : The Image of Native Americans, National Identity, and Nazi Ideology in Germany

By: Usbeck, FrankMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandStudies in German History: Publisher: New York, NY : Berghahn Books, 2015Description: 1 online resource (262 p.)ISBN: 9781782386551Subject(s): Germany -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | Germany -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | Indians in popular culture -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Indians of North America -- Public opinion | National characteristics, German -- History -- 20th century | National socialism -- Philosophy | Nationalism -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Popular culture -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Public opinion -- Germany -- History -- 20th century | Race -- PhilosophyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fellow Tribesmen : The Image of Native Americans, National Identity, and Nazi Ideology in GermanyDDC classification: 305.897 | 305.897043 LOC classification: DD256.6 .U72 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1 - The Image of Indians in German Romanticism and Emerging Nationalism; Chapter 2 - Nation-Formation, National Identity, and Nationalism; Chapter 3 - Relatives, Allies, or Subjects? Applications of Nazi Ideology through Indian Imagery in Popular Media and Academia; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Germans exhibited a widespread cultural passion for tales and representations of Native Americans. This book explores the evolution of German national identity and its relationship with the ideas and cultural practices around ""Indianthusiasm.""  Pervasive and adaptable, imagery of Native Americans was appropriated by Nazi propaganda and merged with exceptionalist notions of German tribalism, oxymoronically promoting the Nazis' racial ideology. This book combines cultural and intellectual history to scrutinize the motifs of Native American imagery in Ge
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Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1 - The Image of Indians in German Romanticism and Emerging Nationalism; Chapter 2 - Nation-Formation, National Identity, and Nationalism; Chapter 3 - Relatives, Allies, or Subjects? Applications of Nazi Ideology through Indian Imagery in Popular Media and Academia; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, Germans exhibited a widespread cultural passion for tales and representations of Native Americans. This book explores the evolution of German national identity and its relationship with the ideas and cultural practices around ""Indianthusiasm.""  Pervasive and adaptable, imagery of Native Americans was appropriated by Nazi propaganda and merged with exceptionalist notions of German tribalism, oxymoronically promoting the Nazis' racial ideology. This book combines cultural and intellectual history to scrutinize the motifs of Native American imagery in Ge

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Buffalo Bill's Wild West tours in the final decades of the 19th century inspired Germany's growing popular fascination with the US. Without setting foot there, German author Karl May composed exceptionally popular novels about life on the unsettled American frontier. Reflecting popular culture throughout Europe and the US, Native American culture represented a return to nature, a rejection of "civilized material wealth" for a "barbarian exoticism" exemplified by Theodore Roosevelt. Early German folkish movements (for example, Wandervogel) offered a foundation from which German fascination with Native American culture subsequently flourished. Another US endeavor, eugenics, fit well with German interests in ethnic studies and social Darwinism as well as with the emerging concern in the 1930s over "racial hygiene." Later, National Socialists divided over whether the dreaded American melting-pot--with its racial implications--signaled the end of Native American culture but were drawn to alleged Native American "purity of blood." Oddly missing here, Aby Warburg contributed his interest in the Pueblo Indians through public lectures. In post-1945 West Germany, popular culture remained enamored with Native American culture when Chancellor Konrad Adenauer donned a Native American headdress without provoking a political backlash. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --David A. Meier, Dickinson State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Usbeck is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Technische Universität Dresden. He earned his Ph.D. at Leipzig University, and his thesis was awarded the Rolf Kentner Dissertation Prize of the Heidelberg Center for American Studies in 2011. He co-edited the collection Participating Audiences, Imagined Public Spheres (2012) and has published a number of essays on Indian imagery in Germany and on ceremonial storytelling in American soldier weblogs. Usbeck is a member of the Dresden-Leipzig research initiative "Selbst-bewusste Erzählungen."

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