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The Good Immigrants : How the Yellow Peril Became the Model Minority

By: Hsu, Madeline Y.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (353 p.).ISBN: 9781400866373.Subject(s): Chinese Americans -- Ethnic identity | Chinese Americans -- Government policy | Chinese Americans -- History | Chinese Americans -- Social conditions | Cultural pluralism -- United States | Political refugees -- United States | Racism -- Political aspects -- United States | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy -- History | United States -- Ethnic relations | United States -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Good Immigrants: How the Yellow Peril Became the Model MinorityDDC classification: 973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Abbreviations; Note on Transliterations; CHAPTER 1: Gateways and Gates in American Immigration History; CHAPTER 2: "The Anglo-Saxons of the Orient" Student Exceptions to the Racial Bar against Chinese, 1872-1925 ; CHAPTER 3: The China Institute in America Advocating for China through Educational Exchange, 1926-1937; CHAPTER 4: "A Pressing Problem of Interracial Justice" Repealing Chinese Exclusion, 1937-1943; CHAPTER 5: The Wartime Transformation of Student Visitors into Refugee Citizens, 1943-1955
CHAPTER 6: "The Best Type of Chinese" Aid Refugee Chinese Intellectuals and Symbolic Refugee Relief, 1952-1960CHAPTER 7: "Economic and Humanitarian" Propaganda and the Redemption of Chinese Immigrants through Refugee Relief; CHAPTER 8: Symbiotic Brain Drains Immigration Reform and the Knowledge Worker Recruitment Act of 1965; CHAPTER 9: Conclusion The American Marketplace of Brains; Acknowledgments; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Conventionally, US immigration history has been understood through the lens of restriction and those who have been barred from getting in. In contrast, The Good Immigrants considers immigration from the perspective of Chinese elites-intellectuals, businessmen, and students-who gained entrance because of immigration exemptions. Exploring a century of Chinese migrations, Madeline Hsu looks at how the model minority characteristics of many Asian Americans resulted from US policies that screened for those with the highest credentials in the most employable fields, enhancing American economic comp
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F358.2.C5 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1910583 Available EBL1910583

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Abbreviations; Note on Transliterations; CHAPTER 1: Gateways and Gates in American Immigration History; CHAPTER 2: "The Anglo-Saxons of the Orient" Student Exceptions to the Racial Bar against Chinese, 1872-1925 ; CHAPTER 3: The China Institute in America Advocating for China through Educational Exchange, 1926-1937; CHAPTER 4: "A Pressing Problem of Interracial Justice" Repealing Chinese Exclusion, 1937-1943; CHAPTER 5: The Wartime Transformation of Student Visitors into Refugee Citizens, 1943-1955

CHAPTER 6: "The Best Type of Chinese" Aid Refugee Chinese Intellectuals and Symbolic Refugee Relief, 1952-1960CHAPTER 7: "Economic and Humanitarian" Propaganda and the Redemption of Chinese Immigrants through Refugee Relief; CHAPTER 8: Symbiotic Brain Drains Immigration Reform and the Knowledge Worker Recruitment Act of 1965; CHAPTER 9: Conclusion The American Marketplace of Brains; Acknowledgments; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Conventionally, US immigration history has been understood through the lens of restriction and those who have been barred from getting in. In contrast, The Good Immigrants considers immigration from the perspective of Chinese elites-intellectuals, businessmen, and students-who gained entrance because of immigration exemptions. Exploring a century of Chinese migrations, Madeline Hsu looks at how the model minority characteristics of many Asian Americans resulted from US policies that screened for those with the highest credentials in the most employable fields, enhancing American economic comp

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Madeline Y. Hsu is associate professor of history and past director of the Center for Asian American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her books include Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home and the coedited anthology Chinese Americans and the Politics of Race and Culture .

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