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The Sisters Are Alright : Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America

By: Winfrey Harris, Tamara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oakland : Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2015Description: 1 online resource (167 p.).ISBN: 9781626563520.Subject(s): African American women -- Biography | African American women -- Public opinion | African American women -- Social conditions | Racism -- United States | Stereotypes (Social psychology) -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Sisters Are Alright : Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in AmericaDDC classification: 305.48/896073 | 305.48896073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction: The Trouble with Black Women; 1 Beauty: Pretty for a Black Girl; 2 Sex: Bump and Grind; 3 Marriage: Witches, Thornbacks, and Sapphires; 4 Motherhood: Between Mammy and a Hard Place; 5 Anger: Twist and Shout; 6 Strength: Precious Mettle; 7 Health: Fat, Sick, and Crazy; Epilogue: The Sisters Are Alright; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: What's wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti-black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves. When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra-servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel-followed close behind. In the '60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.86 .W5565 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1924409 Available EBL1924409

Cover; Contents; Preface; Introduction: The Trouble with Black Women; 1 Beauty: Pretty for a Black Girl; 2 Sex: Bump and Grind; 3 Marriage: Witches, Thornbacks, and Sapphires; 4 Motherhood: Between Mammy and a Hard Place; 5 Anger: Twist and Shout; 6 Strength: Precious Mettle; 7 Health: Fat, Sick, and Crazy; Epilogue: The Sisters Are Alright; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author

What's wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti-black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves. When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra-servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel-followed close behind. In the '60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

By her own admission, Winfrey Harris is angry. This slim debut offering displays the author's well-deserved frustration for stereotypes like the subservient Mammy, emasculating Sapphire, and immoral -Jezebel, and how each is portrayed in pop culture. In relating how these stereotypes (and others such as the Welfare Queen) affect black women, Winfrey Harris uses numerous anecdotes from peers to demystify the "strong black woman" and "angry black woman" as well as media fascination with the "black marriage crisis." Of note is the chapter on health, which explores the taboos of depression and suicide within the black community and the prominence of food deserts in certain areas. Unfortunately, -Harris's information comes from a limited focus group; the only notable women mentioned are -Beyoncé and Michelle Obama, which makes one wish pre-21st-century icons were included. VERDICT Those who believe in postracial America will gain the most from this book; black women won't find much they didn't already know here, though they may obtain affirmation. With frequent mentions of the politics of black hair, this manifesto could complement collections in which Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's We Should All Be Feminists, Ayana Byrd and Lori Tharps's Hair Story, and Chris Rock's film Good Hair circulate regularly.-Stephanie Sendaula, Library Journal © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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