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Multitasking in the Digital Age.

By: Mark, Gloria.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Synthesis Lectures on Human-Centered Informatics: Publisher: San Rafael : Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2015Description: 1 online resource (115 p.).ISBN: 9781627057509.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Multitasking in the Digital AgeOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Introduction; What is Multitasking?; What Contributes to Multitasking?; 3.1Abundance of Information Available ; 3.2Number of Tasks and Projects in which People are Involved; 3.3Size of Workplace Social Networks; 3.4The Ease and Speed of Accessing Information; 3.5The Computer Interface; 3.6The Structure of Hypermedia; 3.7Cultural Assumptions with Technology; 3.8Physical Arrangement of Office Space; Multitasking in Information Work; 4.1Work Fragmentation ; 4.2Measuring Multitasking Activity in situ; 4.3Multitasking: Switching Events; 4.4Multitasking among Devices
4.5Working Spheres4.5.1Central and Peripheral Working Spheres; 4.5.2Working Spheres without "Nonsignificant" Disruptions; 4.5.3Metawork; 4.5.4Work Fragmentation and Time of Day; 4.6Summary and Discussion: Multitasking and Fragmented Work; Interruptions; 5.1Types of Interruptions: External and Internal; 5.1.1Self-Interruptions; 5.2Interruptions and Work; 5.2.1Work Role; 5.2.2Communications and Interruptions; 5.3Interruptions and the Environment; 5.3.1Collocation in the Workplace; 5.3.2Organizational Environment; 5.3.3Time of Day; 5.4Individual Differences; 5.4.1Gender; 5.4.2Personality Traits
5.5Consequences of Interruptions5.5.1Resumption of Interrupted Work; 5.5.2Interruptions and Context; 5.5.3Interruptions and Stress; 5.5.4Control of Interruptions; 5.6Summary and Discussion: The Nature of Interruptions with Digital Media ; Email; 6.1Email Overload; 6.2Email and Multitasking; 6.3Cutting off Email: A Study; 6.4Email and Stress; 6.5Perspectives on Cutting off Email ; 6.5.1Social Norms and Email Use; 5.6Email, Mood, and Focused Attention; 6.7Summary and Discussion: Email and Multitasking; 6.7.1The Continual Flow of Email; 6.7.2The Effort of "Doing" Email
6.7.3Social Norms Associated with Email6.7.4Email as a Representation of Working Spheres; Focus; 7.1Concepts of Attention Focus; 7.2A Theoretical Framework of Attention Focus ; 7.3Patterns of Attentional States; 7.4Attentional State and Mood; 7.5Attentional State and Susceptibility to Distraction; 7.6Summary and Discussion: Focused Attention in the Workplace; Conclusions; References; Author Biography
Summary: In our digital age we can communicate, access, create, and share an abundance of information effortlessly, rapidly, and nearly ubiquitously. The consequence of having so many choices is that they compete for our attention: we continually switch our attention between different types of information while doing different types of tasks--in other words, we multitask. The activity of information workers in particular is characterized by the continual switching of attention throughout the day. In this book, empirical work is presented, based on ethnographic and sensor data collection, which reveals
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Acknowledgments; Introduction; What is Multitasking?; What Contributes to Multitasking?; 3.1Abundance of Information Available ; 3.2Number of Tasks and Projects in which People are Involved; 3.3Size of Workplace Social Networks; 3.4The Ease and Speed of Accessing Information; 3.5The Computer Interface; 3.6The Structure of Hypermedia; 3.7Cultural Assumptions with Technology; 3.8Physical Arrangement of Office Space; Multitasking in Information Work; 4.1Work Fragmentation ; 4.2Measuring Multitasking Activity in situ; 4.3Multitasking: Switching Events; 4.4Multitasking among Devices

4.5Working Spheres4.5.1Central and Peripheral Working Spheres; 4.5.2Working Spheres without "Nonsignificant" Disruptions; 4.5.3Metawork; 4.5.4Work Fragmentation and Time of Day; 4.6Summary and Discussion: Multitasking and Fragmented Work; Interruptions; 5.1Types of Interruptions: External and Internal; 5.1.1Self-Interruptions; 5.2Interruptions and Work; 5.2.1Work Role; 5.2.2Communications and Interruptions; 5.3Interruptions and the Environment; 5.3.1Collocation in the Workplace; 5.3.2Organizational Environment; 5.3.3Time of Day; 5.4Individual Differences; 5.4.1Gender; 5.4.2Personality Traits

5.5Consequences of Interruptions5.5.1Resumption of Interrupted Work; 5.5.2Interruptions and Context; 5.5.3Interruptions and Stress; 5.5.4Control of Interruptions; 5.6Summary and Discussion: The Nature of Interruptions with Digital Media ; Email; 6.1Email Overload; 6.2Email and Multitasking; 6.3Cutting off Email: A Study; 6.4Email and Stress; 6.5Perspectives on Cutting off Email ; 6.5.1Social Norms and Email Use; 5.6Email, Mood, and Focused Attention; 6.7Summary and Discussion: Email and Multitasking; 6.7.1The Continual Flow of Email; 6.7.2The Effort of "Doing" Email

6.7.3Social Norms Associated with Email6.7.4Email as a Representation of Working Spheres; Focus; 7.1Concepts of Attention Focus; 7.2A Theoretical Framework of Attention Focus ; 7.3Patterns of Attentional States; 7.4Attentional State and Mood; 7.5Attentional State and Susceptibility to Distraction; 7.6Summary and Discussion: Focused Attention in the Workplace; Conclusions; References; Author Biography

In our digital age we can communicate, access, create, and share an abundance of information effortlessly, rapidly, and nearly ubiquitously. The consequence of having so many choices is that they compete for our attention: we continually switch our attention between different types of information while doing different types of tasks--in other words, we multitask. The activity of information workers in particular is characterized by the continual switching of attention throughout the day. In this book, empirical work is presented, based on ethnographic and sensor data collection, which reveals

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