Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Four Last Songs : Aging and Creativity in Verdi, Strauss, Messiaen, and Britten

By: Hutcheon, Linda.
Contributor(s): Hutcheon, Michael.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (160 p.).ISBN: 9780226255620.Subject(s): Aging -- Psychological aspects | Britten, Benjamin, 1913-1976 -- Last years | Composers -- Biography | Creative ability in old age | Messiaen, Olivier, 1908-1992 -- Last years | Strauss, Richard, 1864-1949 -- Last years | Verdi, Giuseppe, 1813-1901 -- Last yearsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Four Last Songs : Aging and Creativity in Verdi, Strauss, Messiaen, and BrittenDDC classification: 780.92/2 | 780.922 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; 1. Setting the Stage; 2. Creative Responses to the Challenges of Aging; 3. Giuseppe Verdi (1813- 1901): A Generational Tale of Cultural Nationalism; 4. Richard Strauss (1864- 1949): A Life Review in Music; 5. Olivier Messiaen (1908- 1992): Faith in God and Art; 6. Benjamin Britten (1913- 1976): The Life Narratives of the Ever-Young "Working Composer"; 7. Conclusion: The Particularities of Aging and Creativity; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: <div><b>Linda Hutcheon</b> is university professor emeritus of English and comparative literature at the University of Toronto and the author of many books on contemporary culture and theory. <b>Michael Hutcheon</b> is a pulmonologist and professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. Together they have written several books on opera and medical culture, most recently <i>Opera: The Art of Dying</i>.<br></div>
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML390 .H877 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2027229 Available EBL2027229

Contents; 1. Setting the Stage; 2. Creative Responses to the Challenges of Aging; 3. Giuseppe Verdi (1813- 1901): A Generational Tale of Cultural Nationalism; 4. Richard Strauss (1864- 1949): A Life Review in Music; 5. Olivier Messiaen (1908- 1992): Faith in God and Art; 6. Benjamin Britten (1913- 1976): The Life Narratives of the Ever-Young "Working Composer"; 7. Conclusion: The Particularities of Aging and Creativity; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

<div><b>Linda Hutcheon</b> is university professor emeritus of English and comparative literature at the University of Toronto and the author of many books on contemporary culture and theory. <b>Michael Hutcheon</b> is a pulmonologist and professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. Together they have written several books on opera and medical culture, most recently <i>Opera: The Art of Dying</i>.<br></div>

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Humanist wife Linda (emerita, English, Univ. of Toronto) and physician husband Michael (medicine, Univ. of Toronto) team up to present this brief study about the effects of aging on creativity in the four men of the title, as well as offering impressive musical criticism. The -Hutcheons' scholarly yet accessible text examines the response to aging of Italian composer -Giuseppe Verdi, German composer Richard Strauss, French composer Olivier Messiaen, and British composer Benjamin Britten. In addition to this international quartet, the authors also delve into the lives of other musicians, ranging from Giacomo Rossini to Sergey Prokofiev, making the point that among these artists, old age seldom put a stop to their creativity but instead caused them to adapt in a variety of ways to the changes wrought by age. For example, Britten turned the limitations of his declining health into a strength by ceasing to write operas while concentrating on cantatas. VERDICT The Hutcheons are especially qualified to write such a book because of her extensive background in the humanities and his as a pulmonologist and professor of medicine. Warmly recommended to informed readers, who might also wish to try the authors' Opera: The Art of Dying.-Edward B. Cone, New York © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Linda Hutcheon (emer., English and comparative literature, Univ. of Toronto) and Michael Hutcheon (medicine, Univ. of Toronto) examine the last operas of Giuseppi Verdi, Richard Strauss, Olivier Messiaen, and Benjamin Britten, looking at the complexity of the interrelationship between aging and creativity. The authors contrast Verdi's generatively upbeat late masterpiece Falstaff with the degenerative aspects of Wagner's Parsifal, seeking evidence of continuity or change in comparison with the composers' earlier works. Strauss's Cappriccio is advanced as an example of the artistic equivalent of the gerontological conception of "life review"; Saint Francis of Assisi as Messiaen's attempt to sum up and solidify his musical legacy; and Death in Venice as a reflection of elements of Britten's most intimate personal psyche when confronted with their inevitable demise. The authors conclude that any artist's interface with issues of aging and death is too individualistic to suggest a general theory of their effect on the creative process. The book is well written, and, best of all, will make the reader want to hear the music discussed, or hear it again. No stronger praise can be had for a book that attempts the elusive task of describing music in mere words. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. --Robert M. Bryce, independent scholar

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.