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Orientalism and the Operatic World.

By: Tarling, Nicholas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015Description: 1 online resource (356 p.).ISBN: 9781442245440.Subject(s): Opera -- History and criticism | Opera | Orientalism in operaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Orientalism and the Operatic WorldDDC classification: 782.109 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Argument; Overture; I: Recitatives; Chapter One: Globalising and Glocalising Opera; Chapter Two: The Genre; Chapter Three: Orientalisms; II: Arias; Chapter Four: Bible-Based Operas; Chapter Five: Crusaders, Arabs, and Turks; Chapter Six: Egypt; Chapter Seven: India and Ceylon; Chapter Eight: China; Chapter Nine: Japan; Chapter Ten: Russia; Finale; Index; About the Author
Summary: Nicholas Tarling's Orientalism and the Operatic World places opera in the context of its steady globalization over the last two centuries, offering key insights into such notable operas as George Frederic Handel's Berenice, Giuseppe Verdi's Aida, Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly, Pietro Mascagni's Iris, and others. Orientalism and the Operatic World argues that any close study of the history of Western opera, in the end, fails to support notion propounded by literary scholar Edward Said that the Westerners inevitably stereotyped, dehumanized, and ultimately sought only to dominate the East t
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML1700 .T27 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2035743 Available EBL2035743

Contents; Argument; Overture; I: Recitatives; Chapter One: Globalising and Glocalising Opera; Chapter Two: The Genre; Chapter Three: Orientalisms; II: Arias; Chapter Four: Bible-Based Operas; Chapter Five: Crusaders, Arabs, and Turks; Chapter Six: Egypt; Chapter Seven: India and Ceylon; Chapter Eight: China; Chapter Nine: Japan; Chapter Ten: Russia; Finale; Index; About the Author

Nicholas Tarling's Orientalism and the Operatic World places opera in the context of its steady globalization over the last two centuries, offering key insights into such notable operas as George Frederic Handel's Berenice, Giuseppe Verdi's Aida, Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly, Pietro Mascagni's Iris, and others. Orientalism and the Operatic World argues that any close study of the history of Western opera, in the end, fails to support notion propounded by literary scholar Edward Said that the Westerners inevitably stereotyped, dehumanized, and ultimately sought only to dominate the East t

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This study is based largely on Edward Said's work on Orientalism. The strength of the study is that Tarling (formerly, Univ. of Auckland, New Zealand) approaches his topic primarily as a distinguished scholar of Southeast Asian history, secondarily as an aficionado of Western opera. His deep understanding of Orientalism allows him to express the complexity of globalization and globalization within an already complex art form. The long introduction provides a detailed multidisciplinary summary of the spread of opera within and beyond Europe. Though a bit superficial, the explanation of the evolution of the genre itself is well researched and well documented; though not for the novice, it will be a good refresher for readers who are well versed in opera. Tarling provides no deep musical analysis, instead offering in-depth analysis of operas, grouping them thematically from the origins of the genre to modern contributions, and focusing on the libretti and performance history. The author bases his analysis largely on meticulously researched historical accounts and the scholarly works of others, grouping the operas together in new ways and considering them against what Said posits. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. --Carol A. Traupman-Carr, Moravian College

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