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American Indian Stories of Success.

By: Gipp, Gerald.
Contributor(s): Warner, Linda Sue | Pease, Janine | Shanley, James.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Santa Barbara : ABC-CLIO, 2015Description: 1 online resource (361 p.).ISBN: 9781440831416.Subject(s): Educational change -- United States | Educational leadership -- United States | Indian educators -- United States -- Biography | Indian universities and colleges -- United States -- Anecdotes | Indians of North America -- Education -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Indian Stories of Success: New Visions of Leadership in Indian CountryDDC classification: 370.92/2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Introduction; Notes on Usage; Section 1: Wisdomkeeper; Chapter One: Visions of Educational Revolution; Chapter Two: BIA Indian Education Reform 1979; Chapter Three: Perspectives; Chapter Four: A Community of Leaders: American Indian Education Policy Development; Chapter Five: The Elder Link; Chapter Six: Leadership and Community; Chapter Seven: Creating Sacred Places; Section 2: Storyteller; Chapter Eight: In the Spirit of Life Renewed; Chapter Nine: May It Always Be So; Chapter Ten: Visions Revisited: Leadership in Indian Country
Chapter Eleven: Helps the People: The Dance of the Seasons (Ak bi li kkux she': Ash he'e lee taa li ssua): A Retrospective on LeadershipChapter Twelve: Concrete Teepees, Faceless Bureaucrats, and Learned Helplessness; Section 3: Role Model; Chapter Thirteen: Leadership; Chapter Fourteen: No Mountain Too High; Chapter Fifteen: The Tribal College Movement: My Observation of Leadership in Indian Country; Chapter Sixteen: A Perspective: Indian Education and the Federal Workplace; Chapter Seventeen: Visions Revisited: Increasing the Number of American Indian Health Professionals
Chapter Eighteen: Studying Exceptional Leaders to Create a Model of EffectivenessChapter Nineteen: Leadership and Indian Education: A Dozen Observations; Section 4: Observer; Chapter Twenty: Cultivating Education for Cultural Sustainability in Alaska Native Communities; Chapter Twenty-One: What Are Characteristics of Effective Leaders Based on 40-Plus Years of Living and Learning?; Chapter Twenty-Two: Transferring Knowledge of the Tribal College Movement; Chapter Twenty-Three: Journey into Leadership; Chapter Twenty-Four: A Tribal College President; Leadership Model; Index
About the Editors and Contributors
Summary: This book is written primarily for those young leaders who are beginning careers where they work with Indian tribes and organizations. Each of the stories found in the book represent significant challenges and barriers, along with the reflections of having lived these experiences to become a stronger leader. This book can help younger leaders avoid the mistakes of the past and will help them develop the skills that will sustain them. The book is organized around four styles of leadership found in American Indian society. It presents a graphic model of leadership style and then provides exa
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E97 .A447 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2051523 Available EBL2051523

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright; Contents; Preface; Introduction; Notes on Usage; Section 1: Wisdomkeeper; Chapter One: Visions of Educational Revolution; Chapter Two: BIA Indian Education Reform 1979; Chapter Three: Perspectives; Chapter Four: A Community of Leaders: American Indian Education Policy Development; Chapter Five: The Elder Link; Chapter Six: Leadership and Community; Chapter Seven: Creating Sacred Places; Section 2: Storyteller; Chapter Eight: In the Spirit of Life Renewed; Chapter Nine: May It Always Be So; Chapter Ten: Visions Revisited: Leadership in Indian Country

Chapter Eleven: Helps the People: The Dance of the Seasons (Ak bi li kkux she': Ash he'e lee taa li ssua): A Retrospective on LeadershipChapter Twelve: Concrete Teepees, Faceless Bureaucrats, and Learned Helplessness; Section 3: Role Model; Chapter Thirteen: Leadership; Chapter Fourteen: No Mountain Too High; Chapter Fifteen: The Tribal College Movement: My Observation of Leadership in Indian Country; Chapter Sixteen: A Perspective: Indian Education and the Federal Workplace; Chapter Seventeen: Visions Revisited: Increasing the Number of American Indian Health Professionals

Chapter Eighteen: Studying Exceptional Leaders to Create a Model of EffectivenessChapter Nineteen: Leadership and Indian Education: A Dozen Observations; Section 4: Observer; Chapter Twenty: Cultivating Education for Cultural Sustainability in Alaska Native Communities; Chapter Twenty-One: What Are Characteristics of Effective Leaders Based on 40-Plus Years of Living and Learning?; Chapter Twenty-Two: Transferring Knowledge of the Tribal College Movement; Chapter Twenty-Three: Journey into Leadership; Chapter Twenty-Four: A Tribal College President; Leadership Model; Index

About the Editors and Contributors

This book is written primarily for those young leaders who are beginning careers where they work with Indian tribes and organizations. Each of the stories found in the book represent significant challenges and barriers, along with the reflections of having lived these experiences to become a stronger leader. This book can help younger leaders avoid the mistakes of the past and will help them develop the skills that will sustain them. The book is organized around four styles of leadership found in American Indian society. It presents a graphic model of leadership style and then provides exa

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

What has been the Native American experience of leadership, higher education, and success over the last 75 years? In this new reference, a companion to past titles Health and Social Issues of Native American Women and American Indians and Popular Culture, Gipp, Linda Sue Warner, Janine Pease, and James Shanley, all former tribal college presidents, offer up a multitude of perspectives to address that question, some 24 essays from "a unique group of survivors.individuals who, out of hundreds of thousands of post-World War II American Indian people, were able to move through a largely oppressive, discriminatory, and disinterested educational system to become educational leaders." The resulting work covers such topics as battling learned helplessness and integrating indigenous knowledge into formal education systems. VERDICT A thoughtful, inspiring compendium for Native American studies collections. © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Fifty years ago, this collection would have looked very different, because few formally educated American Indian leaders had emerged. Among this volume's 24 contributors, 16 have doctorates, a percentage unimagined in 1960. As these writers bear witness, opportunities for higher education became available in the Kennedy-Johnson presidential years, providing a launch pad for accelerating Indian achievement. Progress in Indian Country, however, is never smooth; almost universally, these commentators agree that the Reagan era was detrimental to all disadvantaged groups. Patience, moreover, is a commonality throughout the Indian community. Another sine qua non was the self-deprecating sense of humor that deflates egos and sharpens points, as Vine Deloria always demonstrated so skillfully, especially in the presence of academic listeners. While Indian leaders do not literally juggle real balls, they are skilled at balancing the several roles that they inherit; not all are equally talented, but all pass along the symbols of responsibility to their successors and rivals. The editors have opened a revealing window onto the changed and changing universe of American Indian success. These case studies should provide real world experience to those now walking the trail to tribal leadership. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. --James H. O'Donnell, Marietta College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Gerald E. Gipp , PhD, is Hunkpapa Lakota of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. He holds doctorate in educational administration from The Pennsylvania State University.</p> <p> Linda Sue Warner , PhD, is a member of the Comanche Tribe of Oklahoma. She received her doctorate from the University of Oklahoma.</p> <p> Janine B. Pease , EdD, is a member of the Crow Tribe. She received her doctorate in adult and higher education from Montana State University and current resides in Montana.</p> <p> James Shanley , PhD, is a member of the Fort Peck Assiniboine Sioux Tribe. He received his doctorate from The University of North Dakota.</p>

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