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Ties That Bind : The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

By: Miles, Tiya.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.American Crossroads: Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2015Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (417 p.).ISBN: 9780520961029.Subject(s): African Americans -- Georgia | African Americans -- Kinship -- Georgia | Blacks -- Georgia -- Relations with Indians | Cherokee Indians -- History -- 19th century | Cherokee Indians -- Kinship | Cherokee Indians -- Mixed descent | Indian slaves -- Georgia -- History -- 19th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ties That Bind : The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and FreedomDDC classification: 975.004 | 975.00497557 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Ties That Bind; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS; SHOEBOOTS FAMILY TREE; PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION; PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; PART ONE BONE OF MY BONE: SLAVERY, RACE, AND NATION-EAST; 1. Captivity; 2. Slavery; 3. Motherhood; 4. Property; 5. Christianity; 6. Nationhood; 7. Gold Rush; PART TWO OF BLOOD AND BONE: FREEDOM, KINSHIP, AND CITIZENSHIP-WEST; 8. Removal; 9. Capture; 10. Freedom; Epilogue: Citizenship; Coda: The Shoeboots Family Today; APPENDIX 1. RESEARCH METHODS AND CHALLENGES
APPENDIX 2. DEFINITION AND USE OF TERMSAPPENDIX 3. CHEROKEE NAMES AND MISTAKEN IDENTITIES; APPENDIX 4. PRIMARY SOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY; NOTES; SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX
Summary: This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. In the late 1790s, Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, acquired an African slave named Doll. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history-including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E99 .C5 M553 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1925606 Available EBL1925606

Cover; Ties That Bind; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS; SHOEBOOTS FAMILY TREE; PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION; PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; Introduction; PART ONE BONE OF MY BONE: SLAVERY, RACE, AND NATION-EAST; 1. Captivity; 2. Slavery; 3. Motherhood; 4. Property; 5. Christianity; 6. Nationhood; 7. Gold Rush; PART TWO OF BLOOD AND BONE: FREEDOM, KINSHIP, AND CITIZENSHIP-WEST; 8. Removal; 9. Capture; 10. Freedom; Epilogue: Citizenship; Coda: The Shoeboots Family Today; APPENDIX 1. RESEARCH METHODS AND CHALLENGES

APPENDIX 2. DEFINITION AND USE OF TERMSAPPENDIX 3. CHEROKEE NAMES AND MISTAKEN IDENTITIES; APPENDIX 4. PRIMARY SOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY; NOTES; SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX

This beautifully written book, now in its second edition, tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. In the late 1790s, Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, acquired an African slave named Doll. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history-including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Miles (Univ. of Michigan) traces the family of the Cherokee warrior Shoe Boots, his slave Doll, and their descendants from origins in early-19th-century Georgia through the Trail of Tears and subsequent history in Indian Territory in Oklahoma. The book focuses on Doll's life and struggle to define the legal, social, and racial status of herself and her children in the matrix of black, red, slave, and free. Unfortunately, a lack of sources leads the author to an overreliance on fictional works and, to fill in the gaps, far too many paragraphs beginning with "perhaps" and "maybe". Further, the book contains several questionable assertions, such as the claim that the Constitution reserved citizenship rights only for whites, and that American Indian people are "the only population indigenous to the United States." However, despite its shortcomings, the work should stimulate discussion on a number of issues regarding race, slavery, and how far historical methodology can be stretched to provide a voice for the voiceless. As such, libraries with collections on slavery and Native American history should purchase this book. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Undergraduates and above. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)

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