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Voice and New Writing, 1997-2007 : Articulating the Demos

By: Inchley, Maggie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015Description: 1 online resource (213 p.).ISBN: 9781137432339.Subject(s): English drama -- 20th century -- History and criticism | English drama -- 21st century -- History and criticism | Expression in literature | Voice cultureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Voice and New Writing, 1997-2007 : Articulating the DemosDDC classification: 808.120938745 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Articulating the Demos; 1 New Labour, New Voicescapes, 1997-2007; 2 Giddensian Mediation: Voices in Writing, Representation and Actor Training; 3 Migration and Materialism: David Greig, Gregory Burke and Sounding Scottish in Post-devolutionary Voicescapes; 4 Vocalising Allegiance: Kwame Kwei-Armah, Roy Williams and debbie tucker green; 5 Sending Up Citizenship: Young Voices in Tanika Gupta, Mark Ravenhill and Enda Walsh
6 Women Who Kill Children: Mistrusting Mothers in theWork of Deborah Warner and Fiona Shaw, Beatrix Campbell and Judith Jones, and Dennis KellyConclusion: Betrayal and Beyond; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: <p >In New Labour's empathetic regime, how did diverse voices scrutinize its etiquettes of articulation and audibility? Using the voice as cultural evidence, <span style=""font-style:italic;"" >Voice and New Writing</span> explores what it means to 'have' a voice in mainstream theatre and for newly included voices to negotiate with the institutions that 'find' and 'represent' their identities.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR736 .I384 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2006562 Available EBL2006562

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Articulating the Demos; 1 New Labour, New Voicescapes, 1997-2007; 2 Giddensian Mediation: Voices in Writing, Representation and Actor Training; 3 Migration and Materialism: David Greig, Gregory Burke and Sounding Scottish in Post-devolutionary Voicescapes; 4 Vocalising Allegiance: Kwame Kwei-Armah, Roy Williams and debbie tucker green; 5 Sending Up Citizenship: Young Voices in Tanika Gupta, Mark Ravenhill and Enda Walsh

6 Women Who Kill Children: Mistrusting Mothers in theWork of Deborah Warner and Fiona Shaw, Beatrix Campbell and Judith Jones, and Dennis KellyConclusion: Betrayal and Beyond; Notes; Bibliography; Index

<p >In New Labour's empathetic regime, how did diverse voices scrutinize its etiquettes of articulation and audibility? Using the voice as cultural evidence, <span style=""font-style:italic;"" >Voice and New Writing</span> explores what it means to 'have' a voice in mainstream theatre and for newly included voices to negotiate with the institutions that 'find' and 'represent' their identities.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Many theater scholars and practitioners advocate the ideology that all plays are political. Inchley (Queen Mary, Univ. of London, UK) makes a case for the ability of theater to inspire democratic voices. Exploring voice as "scripted and trained, performed and perceived," the author dissects and challenges voice as political authority within a democratic debate. She argues that voice in social contexts and constructs fuels artistic reactions in the theater as a "national voicescape" emerges. Although Inchley focuses on her native UK, the themes she discusses are universal: class, diversity, economic disparity. Looking at the actor's voice as a megaphone for the writer's voice, she examines such playwrights as David Greig, Gregory Burke, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Tanika Gupta, Mark Ravenhill, debbie tucker green, Fiona Shaw, and Beatrix Campbell. Multiculturalism, socialist solutions, suppression of women, and political traditions are challenged in this regional and global voicescape. Respected voice expert Cicely Berry attests to how an actor's voice can awaken in an audience the desire to talk in a democracy. And Inchley agrees: in the theater space, marginalized voices are identified and allowed their articulation. Includes photographs and detailed notes. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers. --Julie Artman, Chapman University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Maggie Inchley is a lecturer in Drama, Theatre and Performance at Queen Mary University of London, UK, and has previously lectured at the University of Surrey and Birkbeck College. As a practitioner she has directed and developed work for theatre, radio, and applied fields.</p>

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