The Guardians.

By: Pedersen, SusanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (590 p.)ISBN: 9780190226398Subject(s): Colonies--History--20th century | HISTORY / Europe / General | HISTORY / Modern / 20th Century | Imperialism--History--20th century | League of Nations--History | Mandates--History--20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of EmpireDDC classification: 341.22 LOC classification: JZ4871Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables and Maps; Principal Players; Introduction: Guardians Assemble; Part I: Making the Mandates System; Chapter One: Of Covenants and Carve-Ups; The great wartime scramble; The Emergence of the Mandates Plan; The waxing and waning of Wilsonianism; Creating facts on the ground; Chapter Two: Rules of the Game; Drummond, Baker, and the Secretariat; Cecil, Nansen, and the Assembly; Rappard and the Mandates Section; The Permanent Mandates Commission
The Commission gets to workChapter Three: A Whole World Talking; The struggle for petitions; Setting the rules; The scope of petitioning; Impact and meaning; Competitive internationalization in Palestine; Part II: Retreat from Self-Determination, 1923-30; Preface: Allies and Rivals; Chapter Four: News from the Orange River; Colonial continuity and African dissent; Settler colonialism at the bar of the League of Nations; Ripples in all directions; A rogue state in the making; Defining 'well-being and development'; Grading on the Lugardian curve; Chapter Five: Bombing Damascus
From humanitarian protest to legitimation crisisThe Mandates Commission at work; The return of 'civilization'; Chapter Six: A Pacific People Says No; The emergence of the Mau; Geneva and the work of legitimation; Punishing the disobedient ward; Part III: New Times, New Norms, 1927-33; Preface: Enter the Germans; Chapter Seven: The Struggle over Sovereignty; The Belgian law of 21 August 1925; The powers of the Mandates Commission, 1926; South West Africa's harbours and railways, 1926-30; Tanganyika and the dream of an East African Dominion, 1927-31
Chapter Eight: Market Economies or Command Economies?The problem of the 'open door'; The problem of 'free labour'; Building 'indirect rule' in Rwanda and Burundi; Famine and forced labour: the 1927-30 crisis; The 'indirect' command economy; Chapter Nine: An Independence Safe for Empire; The evolution of British strategy in Iraq; The Colonial Office and the Mandates Commission square off; Conditions for independence I: sharing the spoils; Conditions for independence II: 'minorities protection'; Part IV: Between Empire and Internationalism, 1933-39; Preface: Multiple Exits
Chapter Ten: Legitimation CrisisNew Guinea and the anthropological turn; Michael Leahy's excellent adventure; The Lugardian model in crisis; Coda: Theodoli in Ovamboland, Ralph Bunche in Lomé; Chapter Eleven: When Empire Stopped Working; German revisionism and British internationalism: a dialogue of the deaf; Making offers he could only refuse; The Plymouth Committee; Hjalmar Schacht and the economic case for transfer; Chamberlain's colonial offer; Seeking shelter from the storm: 'internationalized' territories in a territorializing world; Chapter Twelve: When Internationalism Stopped Working
The Western Wall riots, and the MandatesCommission's Zionist turn, 1929-31
Summary: At the end of the First World War, the Paris Peace Conference saw a battle over the future of empire. The victorious allied powers wanted to annex the Ottoman territories and German colonies they had occupied; Woodrow Wilson and a groundswell of anti-imperialist activism stood in their way. France, Belgium, Japan and the British dominions reluctantly agreed to an Anglo-American proposal to hold and administer those allied conquests under ""mandate"" from the new League of Nations. In the end, fourteen mandated territories were set up across the Middle East, Africa and the Pacific. Against all
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Cover; The Guardians: The League of Nations and the Crisis of Empire; Copyright; Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables and Maps; Principal Players; Introduction: Guardians Assemble; Part I: Making the Mandates System; Chapter One: Of Covenants and Carve-Ups; The great wartime scramble; The Emergence of the Mandates Plan; The waxing and waning of Wilsonianism; Creating facts on the ground; Chapter Two: Rules of the Game; Drummond, Baker, and the Secretariat; Cecil, Nansen, and the Assembly; Rappard and the Mandates Section; The Permanent Mandates Commission

The Commission gets to workChapter Three: A Whole World Talking; The struggle for petitions; Setting the rules; The scope of petitioning; Impact and meaning; Competitive internationalization in Palestine; Part II: Retreat from Self-Determination, 1923-30; Preface: Allies and Rivals; Chapter Four: News from the Orange River; Colonial continuity and African dissent; Settler colonialism at the bar of the League of Nations; Ripples in all directions; A rogue state in the making; Defining 'well-being and development'; Grading on the Lugardian curve; Chapter Five: Bombing Damascus

From humanitarian protest to legitimation crisisThe Mandates Commission at work; The return of 'civilization'; Chapter Six: A Pacific People Says No; The emergence of the Mau; Geneva and the work of legitimation; Punishing the disobedient ward; Part III: New Times, New Norms, 1927-33; Preface: Enter the Germans; Chapter Seven: The Struggle over Sovereignty; The Belgian law of 21 August 1925; The powers of the Mandates Commission, 1926; South West Africa's harbours and railways, 1926-30; Tanganyika and the dream of an East African Dominion, 1927-31

Chapter Eight: Market Economies or Command Economies?The problem of the 'open door'; The problem of 'free labour'; Building 'indirect rule' in Rwanda and Burundi; Famine and forced labour: the 1927-30 crisis; The 'indirect' command economy; Chapter Nine: An Independence Safe for Empire; The evolution of British strategy in Iraq; The Colonial Office and the Mandates Commission square off; Conditions for independence I: sharing the spoils; Conditions for independence II: 'minorities protection'; Part IV: Between Empire and Internationalism, 1933-39; Preface: Multiple Exits

Chapter Ten: Legitimation CrisisNew Guinea and the anthropological turn; Michael Leahy's excellent adventure; The Lugardian model in crisis; Coda: Theodoli in Ovamboland, Ralph Bunche in Lomé; Chapter Eleven: When Empire Stopped Working; German revisionism and British internationalism: a dialogue of the deaf; Making offers he could only refuse; The Plymouth Committee; Hjalmar Schacht and the economic case for transfer; Chamberlain's colonial offer; Seeking shelter from the storm: 'internationalized' territories in a territorializing world; Chapter Twelve: When Internationalism Stopped Working

The Western Wall riots, and the MandatesCommission's Zionist turn, 1929-31

At the end of the First World War, the Paris Peace Conference saw a battle over the future of empire. The victorious allied powers wanted to annex the Ottoman territories and German colonies they had occupied; Woodrow Wilson and a groundswell of anti-imperialist activism stood in their way. France, Belgium, Japan and the British dominions reluctantly agreed to an Anglo-American proposal to hold and administer those allied conquests under ""mandate"" from the new League of Nations. In the end, fourteen mandated territories were set up across the Middle East, Africa and the Pacific. Against all

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