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The Pox of Liberty : How the Constitution Left Americans Rich, Free, and Prone to Infection

By: Troesken, Werner.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Markets and Governments in Economic History: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (248 p.).ISBN: 9780226922195.Subject(s): Constitutional history -- United States | Public health -- United States -- History | Public health laws -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Pox of Liberty : How the Constitution Left Americans Rich, Free, and Prone to InfectionDDC classification: 344.7303/21 LOC classification: KF3775 .T764 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; One / An Introduction; Two / From the Ideology of the Township to the Gospel of Germs; Three / The Constitutional Foundations of Health and Prosperity; Four / The Pox of Liberty; Five / The Palliative Effects of Property Rights; Six / Empire, Federalism, and the Surprising Fall of Yellow Fever; Seven / Concluding Remarks; Notes; Index
Summary: The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world. But that wealth hasn't translated to a higher life expectancy, an area where the United States still ranks thirty-eighth-behind Cuba, Chile, Costa Rica, and Greece, among many others. Some fault the absence of universal health care or the persistence of social inequalities. Others blame unhealthy lifestyles. But these emphases on present-day behaviors and policies miss a much more fundamental determinant of societal health: the state.Werner Troesken looks at the history of the United States with a focus on three diseases-smallpox,
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KF3775 .T764 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2065165 Available EBL2065165

Contents; Preface; One / An Introduction; Two / From the Ideology of the Township to the Gospel of Germs; Three / The Constitutional Foundations of Health and Prosperity; Four / The Pox of Liberty; Five / The Palliative Effects of Property Rights; Six / Empire, Federalism, and the Surprising Fall of Yellow Fever; Seven / Concluding Remarks; Notes; Index

The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world. But that wealth hasn't translated to a higher life expectancy, an area where the United States still ranks thirty-eighth-behind Cuba, Chile, Costa Rica, and Greece, among many others. Some fault the absence of universal health care or the persistence of social inequalities. Others blame unhealthy lifestyles. But these emphases on present-day behaviors and policies miss a much more fundamental determinant of societal health: the state.Werner Troesken looks at the history of the United States with a focus on three diseases-smallpox,

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Although Troesken (Univ. of Pittsburgh) is an economist by training, the light that he sheds on the subject of US vaccination policies in The Pox of Liberty is decidedly interdisciplinary. The result is a fascinating and insightful volume that provides balanced, highly readable analysis about the relationship among the US Constitution, American ideological beliefs about the nature and scope of individual liberty, and sociopolitical public health efforts to eradicate various diseases throughout the history of the country. Some of the ways in which Troesken weaves constitutionalism into his narrative could have been stronger. That is, however, a minor criticism because Troesken convincingly achieves his goal of demonstrating that constitutional interpretation is a very useful lens through which to examine governmental policies that addressed diseases like smallpox and yellow fever. Overall, The Pox of Liberty is an engaging and educational read. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. --Helen J. Knowles, SUNY Oswego

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