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God's gangs : barrio ministry, masculinity, and gang recovery / Edward Orozco Flores.

By: Flores, Edward.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : New York University Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: xiii, 230 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781479850099 (hardback); 1479850098 (hardback); 9781479878123 (paper); 147987812X (paper).Subject(s): Hispanic American gangs -- California -- Los Angeles | Ex-gang members -- Rehabilitation -- California -- Los Angeles | Ex-gang members -- Services for -- California -- Los Angeles | Church work with Hispanic Americans -- California -- Los Angeles | Church and social problems -- California -- Los Angeles | Hispanic American men -- California -- Los Angeles -- Social conditionsDDC classification: 261.8/3310660979494 Other classification: SOC002000 | REL000000 | SOC008000
Contents:
The Latino crime threat: a century of race, marginality, and public policy in Los Angeles -- Into the underclass or out of the barrio? Immigrant integration in Latino Los Angeles -- Recovery from gang life: two models of faith and reintegration -- Reformed barrio masculinity: eight cases of recovery from gang life -- Masculinity and the podium: discourse in gang recovery -- From shaved to saved: embodied gang recovery.
Summary: "Los Angeles is the epicenter of the American gang problem. Rituals and customs from Los Angeles' eastside gangs, including hand signals, graffiti, and clothing styles, have spread to small towns and big cities alike. Many see the problem with gangs as related to urban marginality--for a Latino immigrant population struggling with poverty and social integration, gangs offer a close-knit community. Yet, as Edward Orozco Flores argues in God's Gangs, gang members can be successfully redirected out of gangs through efforts that change the context in which they find themselves, as well as their notions of what it means to be a man. Flores here illuminates how Latino men recover from gang life through involvement in urban, faith-based organizations. Drawing on participant observation and interviews with Homeboy Industries, a Jesuit-founded non-profit that is one of the largest gang intervention programs in the country, and with Victory Outreach, a Pentecostal ministry with over 600 chapters, Flores demonstrates that organizations such as these facilitate recovery from gang life by enabling gang members to reinvent themselves as family men and as members of their community. The book offers a window into the process of redefining masculinity. As Flores convincingly shows, gang members are not trapped in a cycle of poverty and marginality. With the help of urban ministries, such men construct a reformed barrio masculinity to distance themselves from gang life. Edward Orozco Flores is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Loyola University Chicago. "-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV6439.U7 L725 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002073112

"Los Angeles is the epicenter of the American gang problem. Rituals and customs from Los Angeles' eastside gangs, including hand signals, graffiti, and clothing styles, have spread to small towns and big cities alike. Many see the problem with gangs as related to urban marginality--for a Latino immigrant population struggling with poverty and social integration, gangs offer a close-knit community. Yet, as Edward Orozco Flores argues in God's Gangs, gang members can be successfully redirected out of gangs through efforts that change the context in which they find themselves, as well as their notions of what it means to be a man. Flores here illuminates how Latino men recover from gang life through involvement in urban, faith-based organizations. Drawing on participant observation and interviews with Homeboy Industries, a Jesuit-founded non-profit that is one of the largest gang intervention programs in the country, and with Victory Outreach, a Pentecostal ministry with over 600 chapters, Flores demonstrates that organizations such as these facilitate recovery from gang life by enabling gang members to reinvent themselves as family men and as members of their community. The book offers a window into the process of redefining masculinity. As Flores convincingly shows, gang members are not trapped in a cycle of poverty and marginality. With the help of urban ministries, such men construct a reformed barrio masculinity to distance themselves from gang life. Edward Orozco Flores is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Loyola University Chicago. "-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 211-224) and index.

The Latino crime threat: a century of race, marginality, and public policy in Los Angeles -- Into the underclass or out of the barrio? Immigrant integration in Latino Los Angeles -- Recovery from gang life: two models of faith and reintegration -- Reformed barrio masculinity: eight cases of recovery from gang life -- Masculinity and the podium: discourse in gang recovery -- From shaved to saved: embodied gang recovery.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Sociologist Flores (Loyola Univ.) explores the subject of gangs and gang proliferation from the complex perspective of individual recovery and social marginality. While the topic is generalizes most to the larger urban areas across the US, the author applies much of the text and data to the greater Latino areas of Los Angeles. His scholarly, thoughtful approach provides an infusion of spirituality and masculinity as essential variables from which each gang member may reach toward enlightenment, and a foundation on which one may build citizenship. Flores quite accurately identifies and discusses the critical variable of the historic treatment, interpretation, and labeling of Hispanics and their relationship to economic limitations and class creation, which is so glaring in Los Angeles. The author explains that within the barrio communities, the lawlessness that seems to have become one of the most resilient defining characterizations is the result of male resistance and struggle for respect and status. The redirecting of that masculinity and respected identity in the community, in concert with a spiritually based effort to escape gang life, is the essence of this well-developed work. Strongly encouraged for sociology and social work collections. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. M. Seklecki Minot State University

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