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Reliable JavaScript : How to Code Safely in the World's Most Dangerous Language

By: Spencer, Lawrence.
Contributor(s): Richards, Seth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2015Description: 1 online resource (530 p.).ISBN: 9781119028734.Subject(s): Application software -- Development | JavaScript (Computer program language) | Web site development -- Computer programs | Web sites -- DesignGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reliable JavaScript : How to Code Safely in the World's Most Dangerous LanguageDDC classification: 005.4 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Reliable JavaScript®; Contents; Introduction; Part I: Laying a Solid Foundation; Chapter 1: Practicing Skillful Software; Writing Code That Starts Correct; Mastering the Features of JavaScript; Case Study: D3.js; JavaScript Is Single-Threaded; Avoiding JavaScript's Pitfalls in Larger Systems; Scripts Are Not Modules; Nested Functions Control Scope; Coding by Contract; Applying the Principles of Software Engineering; The SOLID Principles; The DRY Principle; Writing Code That Stays Correct; Investing for the Future with Unit Tests; Practicing Test-Driven Development
Engineering Your Code to Be Easy to TestSummary; Chapter 2: Tooling Up ; Using a Testing Framework; Identifying Incorrect Code; Designing for Testability; Writing the Minimum Required Code; Safe Maintenance and Refactoring; Runnable Specification; Current Open-Source and Commercial Frameworks; QUnit; D.O.H.; Introducing Jasmine; Suites and Specs; Expectations and Matchers; Spies; Using a Dependency-Injection Framework; What Is Dependency Injection?; Making Your Code More Reliable with Dependency Injection; Mastering Dependency Injection
Case Study: Writing a Lightweight Dependency-Injection FrameworkUsing a Dependency-Injection Framework; Current Dependency-Injection Frameworks; RequireJS; AngularJS; Using an Aspect Toolkit; Case Study: Caching with and without AOP; Implementing Caching without AOP; Making Your Code More Reliable with AOP; Case Study: Building the Aop.js Module; Other AOP Libraries; AspectJS; AopJS jQuery Plugin; YUI's Do Class; Conclusion; Using a Code-Checking Tool; Making Your Code More Reliable with Linting Tools; Introducing JSHint; Using JSHint; If You Don't Run It, Bugs Will Come
Alternatives to JSHintJSLint; ESLint; Strict Mode; Summary; Chapter 3: Constructing Reliable Objects; Using Primitives; Using Object Literals; Using the Module Pattern; Creating Modules-at-Will; Creating Immediate-Execution Modules; Creating Reliable Modules; Using Object Prototypes and Prototypal Inheritance; The Default Object Prototype; Prototypal Inheritance; Prototype Chains; Creating Objects with New; The new Object Creation Pattern; Potential for Bad Things to Happen; Enforcing the Use of new; Using Classical Inheritance; Emulating Classical Inheritance; Repetition Killed the Kangaroo
Using Functional InheritanceMonkey-Patching; Summary; Part II: Testing Pattern-Based Code; Chapter 4: Reviewing the Benefits of Patterns; Case Study; Producing More Elegant Code by Using a Broader Vocabulary; Producing Reliable Code with Well-Engineered, Well-Tested Building Blocks; Summary; Chapter 5: Ensuring Correct Use of the Call back Pattern; Understanding the Pattern Through Unit Tests; Writing and Testing Code That Uses Callback Functions; Writing and Testing Callback Functions; Avoiding Problems; Flattening the Callback Arrow; Minding this; Summary
Chapter 6: Ensuring Correct Use of the Promise Pattern
Summary: Create more robust applications with a test-first approach to JavaScript Reliable JavaScript, How to Code Safely in the World's Most Dangerous Language demonstrates how to create test-driven development for large-scale JavaScript applications that will stand the test of time and stay accurate through long-term use and maintenance. Taking a test-first approach to software architecture, this book walks you through several patterns and practices and explains what they are supposed to do by having you write unit tests. Write the code to pass the unit tests, so you not only develop your technique
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.73.J39 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1964112 Available EBL1964112

Reliable JavaScript®; Contents; Introduction; Part I: Laying a Solid Foundation; Chapter 1: Practicing Skillful Software; Writing Code That Starts Correct; Mastering the Features of JavaScript; Case Study: D3.js; JavaScript Is Single-Threaded; Avoiding JavaScript's Pitfalls in Larger Systems; Scripts Are Not Modules; Nested Functions Control Scope; Coding by Contract; Applying the Principles of Software Engineering; The SOLID Principles; The DRY Principle; Writing Code That Stays Correct; Investing for the Future with Unit Tests; Practicing Test-Driven Development

Engineering Your Code to Be Easy to TestSummary; Chapter 2: Tooling Up ; Using a Testing Framework; Identifying Incorrect Code; Designing for Testability; Writing the Minimum Required Code; Safe Maintenance and Refactoring; Runnable Specification; Current Open-Source and Commercial Frameworks; QUnit; D.O.H.; Introducing Jasmine; Suites and Specs; Expectations and Matchers; Spies; Using a Dependency-Injection Framework; What Is Dependency Injection?; Making Your Code More Reliable with Dependency Injection; Mastering Dependency Injection

Case Study: Writing a Lightweight Dependency-Injection FrameworkUsing a Dependency-Injection Framework; Current Dependency-Injection Frameworks; RequireJS; AngularJS; Using an Aspect Toolkit; Case Study: Caching with and without AOP; Implementing Caching without AOP; Making Your Code More Reliable with AOP; Case Study: Building the Aop.js Module; Other AOP Libraries; AspectJS; AopJS jQuery Plugin; YUI's Do Class; Conclusion; Using a Code-Checking Tool; Making Your Code More Reliable with Linting Tools; Introducing JSHint; Using JSHint; If You Don't Run It, Bugs Will Come

Alternatives to JSHintJSLint; ESLint; Strict Mode; Summary; Chapter 3: Constructing Reliable Objects; Using Primitives; Using Object Literals; Using the Module Pattern; Creating Modules-at-Will; Creating Immediate-Execution Modules; Creating Reliable Modules; Using Object Prototypes and Prototypal Inheritance; The Default Object Prototype; Prototypal Inheritance; Prototype Chains; Creating Objects with New; The new Object Creation Pattern; Potential for Bad Things to Happen; Enforcing the Use of new; Using Classical Inheritance; Emulating Classical Inheritance; Repetition Killed the Kangaroo

Using Functional InheritanceMonkey-Patching; Summary; Part II: Testing Pattern-Based Code; Chapter 4: Reviewing the Benefits of Patterns; Case Study; Producing More Elegant Code by Using a Broader Vocabulary; Producing Reliable Code with Well-Engineered, Well-Tested Building Blocks; Summary; Chapter 5: Ensuring Correct Use of the Call back Pattern; Understanding the Pattern Through Unit Tests; Writing and Testing Code That Uses Callback Functions; Writing and Testing Callback Functions; Avoiding Problems; Flattening the Callback Arrow; Minding this; Summary

Chapter 6: Ensuring Correct Use of the Promise Pattern

Create more robust applications with a test-first approach to JavaScript Reliable JavaScript, How to Code Safely in the World's Most Dangerous Language demonstrates how to create test-driven development for large-scale JavaScript applications that will stand the test of time and stay accurate through long-term use and maintenance. Taking a test-first approach to software architecture, this book walks you through several patterns and practices and explains what they are supposed to do by having you write unit tests. Write the code to pass the unit tests, so you not only develop your technique

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> About the authors </p> <p> Larry Spencer leads an international team of developers at ScerIS, a software and services company near Boston. He has over 35 years' experience as an executive, developer, consultant, teacher, and frequent presenter at programming conferences.</p> <p> Seth Richards has been crafting software professionally since 2002. His past work focused on web-based, enterprise-class geographic information system applications.</p> <p>Visit us at wrox.com where you have access to free code samples, Programmer to Programmer forums, and discussions on the latest happenings in the industry from around the world.</p>

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