Preserving the Spell : Basile's ""The Tale of Tales"" and Its Afterlife in the Fairy-Tale Tradition

By: Maggi, ArmandoMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (408 p.)ISBN: 9780226243016Subject(s): Basile, Giambattista, -- Approximately 1575-1632 -- Criticism and interpretation | Fairy tales -- Social aspects | Fairy tales -- Western countries -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Preserving the Spell : Basile's ""The Tale of Tales"" and Its Afterlife in the Fairy-Tale TraditionDDC classification: 398.2 LOC classification: GR550 .M384 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Dancing Backward: An Introduction; Part I - ""Cupid and Psyche,"" The Tale of Tales, and the Birth of Western Fairy Tale; Chapter One - A Never Ending and Never Told Tale: Basile's Undoing of ""Cupid and Psyche""; Chapter Two - Orpheus, the King of the Birds, Moves to Sicily with Cupid and Psyche: Laura Gonzenbach's ""King Cardiddu""; Chapter Three - Melancholy is the Best Storyteller: Oil, Water, and Blood from Gonzenbach back to Basile; Part II - The Italian Tales and German Romanticism: The Brothers Grimm, Clemens Brentano, Novalis
Chapter Four - What We Leave Behind: Fairies, Letters, Rose Petals, and Sprigs of MyrtleChapter Five - The Fairy, the Myrtle, and the Myrtle-Maiden: From Basile to the Grimms and Brentano; Chapter Six - How to Undo The Tale of Tales: Brentano and the End of Fairy Tales; Chapter Seven - Where are the Ogresses of Yesteryear? The Neapolitan Cupids and Psyches in the Hands of the Brothers Grimm; Chapter Eight - Beauty, Zulima, and Aline: The Marvel Preceding and Following the World According to Novalis; Part III - American Postmodernism, Memoirs, and a New Beginning
Chapter Nine - ""You Will Never Awaken Because the Story You Were In No Longer Exists"": Coover, Postmodernism, and the End of an EraChapter Ten - ""Disney World Has Become a Kind of Reverse Lourdes"": From Stanley Elkin back to Basile; Chapter Eleven - ""A Benign Fairy Tale out of the Brothers Grimm"": Memoirs and the Magic of Reality; Chapter Twelve - ""Everying Beautiful is Gone"": Beasts of the Southern Wild and a New Beginning; Appendix: The Grimms' Adaptation of Giambattista Basile's The Tale of Tales; Notes; Index
Summary: Fairy tales are supposed to be magical, surprising, and exhilarating, an enchanting counterpoint to everyday life that nonetheless helps us understand and deal with the anxieties of that life. Today, however, fairy tales are far from marvelous-in the hands of Hollywood, they have been stripped of their power, offering little but formulaic narratives and tame surprises. If we want to rediscover the power of fairy tales-as Armando Maggi thinks we should-we need to discover a new mythic lens, a new way of approaching and understanding, and thus re-creating, the transformative potential of these s
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Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Dancing Backward: An Introduction; Part I - ""Cupid and Psyche,"" The Tale of Tales, and the Birth of Western Fairy Tale; Chapter One - A Never Ending and Never Told Tale: Basile's Undoing of ""Cupid and Psyche""; Chapter Two - Orpheus, the King of the Birds, Moves to Sicily with Cupid and Psyche: Laura Gonzenbach's ""King Cardiddu""; Chapter Three - Melancholy is the Best Storyteller: Oil, Water, and Blood from Gonzenbach back to Basile; Part II - The Italian Tales and German Romanticism: The Brothers Grimm, Clemens Brentano, Novalis

Chapter Four - What We Leave Behind: Fairies, Letters, Rose Petals, and Sprigs of MyrtleChapter Five - The Fairy, the Myrtle, and the Myrtle-Maiden: From Basile to the Grimms and Brentano; Chapter Six - How to Undo The Tale of Tales: Brentano and the End of Fairy Tales; Chapter Seven - Where are the Ogresses of Yesteryear? The Neapolitan Cupids and Psyches in the Hands of the Brothers Grimm; Chapter Eight - Beauty, Zulima, and Aline: The Marvel Preceding and Following the World According to Novalis; Part III - American Postmodernism, Memoirs, and a New Beginning

Chapter Nine - ""You Will Never Awaken Because the Story You Were In No Longer Exists"": Coover, Postmodernism, and the End of an EraChapter Ten - ""Disney World Has Become a Kind of Reverse Lourdes"": From Stanley Elkin back to Basile; Chapter Eleven - ""A Benign Fairy Tale out of the Brothers Grimm"": Memoirs and the Magic of Reality; Chapter Twelve - ""Everying Beautiful is Gone"": Beasts of the Southern Wild and a New Beginning; Appendix: The Grimms' Adaptation of Giambattista Basile's The Tale of Tales; Notes; Index

Fairy tales are supposed to be magical, surprising, and exhilarating, an enchanting counterpoint to everyday life that nonetheless helps us understand and deal with the anxieties of that life. Today, however, fairy tales are far from marvelous-in the hands of Hollywood, they have been stripped of their power, offering little but formulaic narratives and tame surprises. If we want to rediscover the power of fairy tales-as Armando Maggi thinks we should-we need to discover a new mythic lens, a new way of approaching and understanding, and thus re-creating, the transformative potential of these s

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Like early fairy tales that involved incest, fratricide, rape, and cannibalism, Preserving the Spell is not for the faint of heart. In his introduction, Maggi (Univ. of Chicago) warns that "a 'dirty,' unrefined kind of storytelling is the central topic of this book." Maggi takes as his departure point the collected fairy tales of Neapolitan Giambattista Basile (1566-1632); he focuses on Basile's version of the myth of Cupid and Psyche. Several studies of the Italian forebears of present-day fairy tales have recently been published--works by Nancy Canepa, Jack Zipes, and Ruth Bottigheimer. Maggi goes beyond those studies, offering what is essentially a study of intertextuality: one travels through the centuries, alerted to revisions/rewriting/riffing on the Cupid and Psyche myth. Maggi includes Germans Clemens Brentano, the Grimm brothers, and Novalis and then follows the trail/tale into the postmodern with analyses of works by Robert Coover and Stanley Elkin, memoirs inflected with fairy tale tropes, and the 2012 film Beasts of the Southern Wild. Footnotes citing French, German, Italian, and English sources reveal Maggi's deep familiarity with the robust scholarship on fairy tales of the past three decades. An appendix provides Maggi's translations of the Grimm brothers' versions of 50 Basile tales. The volume's only shortcoming is the absence of a bibliography. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Elizabeth R. Baer, Gustavus Adolphus College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Armando Maggi is professor of romance languages and literatures and a member of the Committee on the History of Culture at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books, including Satan's Rhetoric and The Resurrection of the Body: Pier Paolo Pasolini from Sade to Saint Paul , both published by the University of Chicago Press.

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