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The warmth of other suns : the epic story of America's great migration / Isabel Wilkerson.

By: Wilkerson, Isabel.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Random House, c2010Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 622 p. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780679444329; 0679444327; 9781448755936; 144875593X; 9780679763888; 0679763880.Other title: Epic story of America's great migration | America's great migration.Subject(s): African Americans -- Migrations -- History -- 20th century | Migration, Internal -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Rural-urban migration -- United States -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 304.80973 | 304.873 Other classification: NW 2708
Contents:
In the Land of the Forefathers -- Leaving -- Great Migration, 1915-1970 -- Beginnings -- Ida Mae Brandon Gladney -- Stirrings of discontent -- George Swanson Starling -- Robert Joseph Pershing Foster -- Burdensome labor -- Awakening -- Breaking away -- Exodus -- Appointed time of their coming -- Crossing over -- Kinder Mistress -- Chicago -- New York -- Los Angeles -- Things they left behind -- Transplanted in alien soil -- Divisions -- To bend in strange winds -- Other side of Jordan -- Complications -- River keeps running -- Prodigals -- Disillusionment -- Revolutions -- Fullness of the migration -- Aftermath -- In the places they left -- Losses -- More North and West than South -- Redemption -- Perhaps, to bloom -- Winter of their lives -- Emancipation of Ida Mae -- Epilogue -- Notes on methodology -- Afterword -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index -- Permissions acknowledgments.
Awards: Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, 2011. | National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, 2010.Summary: Product Description: One of The New York Times Book Reviews 10 Best Books of the Year. In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an "unrecognized immigration" within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E185.6 .W685 2010 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002074342

Includes bibliographical references (p. [555]-587) and index.

Part 1: In the Land of the Forefathers -- Leaving -- Great Migration, 1915-1970 -- Part 2: Beginnings -- Ida Mae Brandon Gladney -- Stirrings of discontent -- George Swanson Starling -- Robert Joseph Pershing Foster -- Burdensome labor -- Awakening -- Breaking away -- Part 3: Exodus -- Appointed time of their coming -- Crossing over -- Part 4: Kinder Mistress -- Chicago -- New York -- Los Angeles -- Things they left behind -- Transplanted in alien soil -- Divisions -- To bend in strange winds -- Other side of Jordan -- Complications -- River keeps running -- Prodigals -- Disillusionment -- Revolutions -- Fullness of the migration -- Part 5: Aftermath -- In the places they left -- Losses -- More North and West than South -- Redemption -- Perhaps, to bloom -- Winter of their lives -- Emancipation of Ida Mae -- Epilogue -- Notes on methodology -- Afterword -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index -- Permissions acknowledgments.

Product Description: One of The New York Times Book Reviews 10 Best Books of the Year. In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an "unrecognized immigration" within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.

Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, 2011.

National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, 2010.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Wilkerson's epic and intimate scholarly portrait of the Great Migration of southern African Americans to the North is the first comprehensive study of that movement. Previous works have focused on regional migrations and James N. Gregory's The Southern Diaspora deals with the comprehensive migration of both whites and African Americans to the North. Covering the time period from 1915 through 1970, Wilkerson (journalism, Boston Univ.) explains the Great Migration through oral histories, research from newspaper articles, and other scholarly works. She shatters previous scholarship that defined these migrants as poor, illiterate, jobless, and dependent on welfare through thorough research of demographic and census records. Wilkerson, whose mother was a part of the Great Migration, discusses the movement's effects on culture and politics through the oral histories she gathered from her three protagonists; they speak and simply tell their stories. Verdict A portrait that is rooted in scholarly research and gives this pivotal part of American history a personality, this will be a great addition for academics, historians, and researchers in Africana, as well as American cultural studies.-Suzan Alteri, Wayne State Univ., Detroit (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Readers of this book should be warned. This is not traditional history; it is, however, good history. Using the lives of three African Americans whose stories personified the migration of southern rural blacks to northern cities, Wilkerson (journalism, Boston Univ.) takes a known but seldom understood demographic transformation of the US and makes it a compelling narrative. Through the text, the author offers insight into the great migration between 1915 and 1970, US race relations, the dynamics of African American life both southern and northern, the civil rights movement, and the pervasive influence of kinship. The story puts the great migration clearly in the context of immigration, albeit with a significant twist, in that the migrants were Americans to begin with. Based on numerous interviews with not only the individuals whose story the author is telling, but also with those who added depth to those stories, the book is a good demonstration of the use of oral history. To historians accustomed to a crisper chronology, the book will be frustrating, but that should not negate the importance of this contribution. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Undergraduate and graduate readers as well as the general public. T. F. Armstrong Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, UAE

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Isabel Wilkerson was born in Washington, D.C. She received a bachelor's degree in journalism from Howard University. She won the Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau Chief of The New York Times in 1994, making her the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win a Pulitzer Prize and the first African-American to win for individual reporting. She also won the George Polk Award, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, and she was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists. <p> Her first book, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, won the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Anisfield-Wolf Award for Nonfiction, the 2011 Hillman Book Prize, the 2011 Heartland Prize for Nonfiction, the Stephen Ambrose Oral History Prize, the Independent Literary Award for Nonfiction, and the NAACP Image Award for best literary debut. She has been a journalism professor at Princeton University and Emory University. She is currently Professor of Journalism and Director of Narrative Nonfiction at Boston University. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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