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The Democratic Constitution.

By: Devins, Neal.
Contributor(s): Fisher, Louis.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2015Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (369 p.).ISBN: 9780190279561.Subject(s): Constitutional history -- United States | Constitutional law -- United States | Judicial process -- United States | United States -- Constitution | United States -- Politics and governmentGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Democratic ConstitutionDDC classification: 342.7302 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; The Democratic Constitution; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; Introduction; 1. Judicial Supremacy as Orthodoxy; 2. Who Participates?; 3. Federalism; 4. Separation of Powers; 5. The War Power; 6. Privacy; 7. Race; 8. Speech; 9. Religion; 10. The Ongoing Dialogue; Case Index; Subject Index
Summary: Constitutional law is clearly shaped by judicial actors. But who else contributes? Scholars in the past have recognized that the legislative branch plays a significant role in determining structural issues, such as separation of powers and federalism, but stopped there--claiming that only courts had the independence and expertise to safeguard individual and minority rights. In this readable and engaging narrative, the authors identify the nuts and bolts of the national dialogue and relate succinct examples of how elected officials and the general public often dominate the Supreme Court in defi
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF4550 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2121282 Available EBL2121282

Cover; The Democratic Constitution; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface; Introduction; 1. Judicial Supremacy as Orthodoxy; 2. Who Participates?; 3. Federalism; 4. Separation of Powers; 5. The War Power; 6. Privacy; 7. Race; 8. Speech; 9. Religion; 10. The Ongoing Dialogue; Case Index; Subject Index

Constitutional law is clearly shaped by judicial actors. But who else contributes? Scholars in the past have recognized that the legislative branch plays a significant role in determining structural issues, such as separation of powers and federalism, but stopped there--claiming that only courts had the independence and expertise to safeguard individual and minority rights. In this readable and engaging narrative, the authors identify the nuts and bolts of the national dialogue and relate succinct examples of how elected officials and the general public often dominate the Supreme Court in defi

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Devins (College of William and Mary) and Fisher (Congressional Research Service) have two goals: debunk the myth that the US Supreme Court is the ultimate arbiter of the meaning of the US Constitution and demonstrate that the American system was designed to have multiple entities playing roles in constitutional interpretation. The authors accomplish both in superb fashion. With in-depth constitutional law case studies--in the areas of federalism, separation of powers, war powers, privacy, race, speech, and religion--Devins and Fisher demonstrate without a doubt that elected federal and state officials regularly join the court in the important work of constitutional interpretation and build a convincing normative case for the propriety of such an arrangement. The authors also show that the court must confront the same real-world concerns, such as public opinion and politics, that elected officials do. This is a wonderful piece of work. Students of American government and politics at all levels will benefit from reading this book. Summing Up: Essential. --Mark D. Brewer, University of Maine

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Neal Devins is the Sandra Day O'Connor Professor of Law, Professor of Government, Director, Institute of Bill of Rights Law, William and MaryLouis Fisher is Senior Specialist in Separation of Powers, Congressional Research Service

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