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Torture and Dignity : An Essay on Moral Injury

By: Bernstein, J. M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (391 p.).ISBN: 9780226266466.Subject(s): Beccaria, Cesare, marchese di, 1738-1794 | Ethics -- 21st century | Rape -- Moral and ethical aspects | Torture -- Moral and ethical aspects | Trust -- Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Torture and Dignity : An Essay on Moral InjuryDDC classification: 174/.936466 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Part I: History, Phenomenology, and Moral Analysis -- ONE / Abolishing Torture and the Uprising of the Rule of Law -- I. Introduction -- II. Abolishing Torture: The Dignity of Tormentable Bodies -- III. Torture and the Rule of Law: Beccaria -- IV. The Beccaria Thesis -- V. Forgetting Beccaria -- TWO / On Being Tortured -- I. Introduction -- II. Pain: Certainty and Separateness -- III. Améry's Torture -- IV. Pain's Aversiveness -- V. Pain: Feeling or Reason? -- VI. Sovereignty: Pain and the Other -- VII. Without Borders: Loss of Trust in the World
THREE / The Harm of Rape, the Harm of Torture -- I. Introduction: Rape and/as Torture -- II. Moral Injury as Appearance -- III. Moral Injury as Actual: Bodily Persons -- IV. On Being Raped -- V. Exploiting the Moral Ontology of the Body: Rape -- VI. Exploiting the Moral Ontology of the Body: Torture -- Part II: Constructing Moral Dignity -- FOUR / To Be Is to Live, to Be Is to Be Recognized -- I. Introduction -- II. To Be Is to Be Recognized -- III. Risk and the Necessity of Life for Self-Consciousness -- IV. Being and Having a Body -- V. From Life to Recognition
FIVE / Trust as Mutual Recognition -- I. Introduction -- II. The Necessity, Pervasiveness, and Invisibility of Trust -- III. Trust's Priority over Reason -- IV. Trust in a Developmental Setting -- V. On First Love: Trust as the Recognition of Intrinsic Worth -- SIX / "My Body . . . My Physical and Metaphysical Dignity" -- I. Why Dignity? -- II. From Nuremberg to Treblinka: The Fate of the Unlovable -- III. Without Rights, without Dignity: From Humiliation to Devastation -- IV. Dignity and the Human Form -- V. The Body without Dignity -- VI. My Body: Voluntary and Involuntary
VII. Bodily Revolt: Respect, Self-Respect, and Dignity -- Concluding Remarks / On Moral Alienation -- I. The Abolition of Torture and Utilitarian Fantasies -- II. Moral Alienation and the Persistence of Rape -- Notes -- Index
Summary: In this unflinching look at the experience of suffering and one of its greatest manifestations-torture-J.M. Bernstein critiques the repressions of traditional moral theory, showing that our morals are not immutable ideals but fragile constructions that depend on our experience of suffering itself. Morals, Bernstein argues, not only guide our conduct but also express the depth of mutual dependence that we share as vulnerable and injurable individuals.               Beginning with the attempts to abolish torture in the eighteenth century, and then sensitively examining what is suffered in tortur
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV8593 .B475 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2130139 Available EBL2130139

Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- Part I: History, Phenomenology, and Moral Analysis -- ONE / Abolishing Torture and the Uprising of the Rule of Law -- I. Introduction -- II. Abolishing Torture: The Dignity of Tormentable Bodies -- III. Torture and the Rule of Law: Beccaria -- IV. The Beccaria Thesis -- V. Forgetting Beccaria -- TWO / On Being Tortured -- I. Introduction -- II. Pain: Certainty and Separateness -- III. Améry's Torture -- IV. Pain's Aversiveness -- V. Pain: Feeling or Reason? -- VI. Sovereignty: Pain and the Other -- VII. Without Borders: Loss of Trust in the World

THREE / The Harm of Rape, the Harm of Torture -- I. Introduction: Rape and/as Torture -- II. Moral Injury as Appearance -- III. Moral Injury as Actual: Bodily Persons -- IV. On Being Raped -- V. Exploiting the Moral Ontology of the Body: Rape -- VI. Exploiting the Moral Ontology of the Body: Torture -- Part II: Constructing Moral Dignity -- FOUR / To Be Is to Live, to Be Is to Be Recognized -- I. Introduction -- II. To Be Is to Be Recognized -- III. Risk and the Necessity of Life for Self-Consciousness -- IV. Being and Having a Body -- V. From Life to Recognition

FIVE / Trust as Mutual Recognition -- I. Introduction -- II. The Necessity, Pervasiveness, and Invisibility of Trust -- III. Trust's Priority over Reason -- IV. Trust in a Developmental Setting -- V. On First Love: Trust as the Recognition of Intrinsic Worth -- SIX / "My Body . . . My Physical and Metaphysical Dignity" -- I. Why Dignity? -- II. From Nuremberg to Treblinka: The Fate of the Unlovable -- III. Without Rights, without Dignity: From Humiliation to Devastation -- IV. Dignity and the Human Form -- V. The Body without Dignity -- VI. My Body: Voluntary and Involuntary

VII. Bodily Revolt: Respect, Self-Respect, and Dignity -- Concluding Remarks / On Moral Alienation -- I. The Abolition of Torture and Utilitarian Fantasies -- II. Moral Alienation and the Persistence of Rape -- Notes -- Index

In this unflinching look at the experience of suffering and one of its greatest manifestations-torture-J.M. Bernstein critiques the repressions of traditional moral theory, showing that our morals are not immutable ideals but fragile constructions that depend on our experience of suffering itself. Morals, Bernstein argues, not only guide our conduct but also express the depth of mutual dependence that we share as vulnerable and injurable individuals.               Beginning with the attempts to abolish torture in the eighteenth century, and then sensitively examining what is suffered in tortur

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CHOICE Review

Bernstein (New School for Social Research) presents a strong case for moving ethical inquiry in a new direction. A new direction is necessary, he argues, because theological ethics apart from the framework in which it is embedded has lost its hold in contemporary secular cultures, because virtue ethics isolated from its base in Aristotelean naturalism has lost its intelligibility, and because utilitarian ethics presents insuperable obstacles to dealing with moral injury exemplified by the many and frequent acts that violate and destroy both the bodies and the identities of victims. Using rape and torture as paradigmatic cases of moral injury, the author invites ethicists to begin their analysis and theory construction by focusing on victims and addressing, as he writes in his introduction, "what makes ... pains suffered morally wrongful ones." The next move, Bernstein argues, should be toward reconstructing ethical reflection and guidance based on victims' ability to recover through regaining trust in the world and reconstruction of the damaged self through relations to others. Human dignity, the opposite of rape and torture, can be lost and restored, for it is the inherent and intrinsic worth of human beings. Bernstein's presentation is clear, original, and persuasive. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. --Larry J. Alderink, Concordia College

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