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The Texas Right : the radical roots of Lone Star conservatism / edited by David O'Donald Cullen & Kyle G. Wilkison.

Contributor(s): Cullen, David O'Donald, 1951- | Wilkison, Kyle Grant, 1960-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Elma Dill Russell Spencer series in the West and Southwest: no. 39.Publisher: College Station : Texas A&M University Press, [2014]Edition: 1st ed.Description: 191 p. ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781623490287 (cloth : alk. paper); 1623490286 (cloth : alk. paper); 9781623490294 (pbk. : alk. paper); 1623490294 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9781623491116 (e-book); 1623491118 (e-book).Subject(s): Radicalism -- Texas -- History | Conservatism -- Texas -- History | Right-wing extremists -- Texas -- History | Religious right -- Texas -- History | Tea Party movement -- Texas -- History | Social movements -- Texas -- History | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | Texas -- Politics and government -- 1951-DDC classification: 303.48/4 LOC classification: HN79.T43 | R383 2014
Contents:
From "Turn Texas loose" to the Tea Party: origins of the Texas Right / David O'Donald Cullen -- Texan by color: the racialization of the Lone Star state / Michael Phillips -- "The evils of socialism": the religious right in early twentieth-century Texas / Kyle G. Wilkison -- "He, being dead, yet speaketh": J. Frank Norris and the Texas religious right at midcentury / Samuel K. Tullock -- The far right in Texas politics during the Roosevelt era / Keith Volanto -- Establishing the Texas Right, 1940-1960 / George N. Green -- The paranoid style and its limits: the power, influence, and failure of the postwar Texas far right / Sean P. Cunningham -- Focus on the family: twentieth-century conservative Texas women and the Lone Star Right / Nancy E. Baker -- Texas tradition and the Right: continuity and change / Michael Lind.
Summary: "In The Texas Right: The Radical Roots of Lone Star Conservatism, some of our most accomplished and readable historians push the origins of present-day Texas conservatism back to the decade preceding the twentieth century. They illuminate the initial factors that began moving Texas to the far right, even before the arrival of the New Deal. By demonstrating that Texas politics foreshadowed the partisan realignment of the erstwhile Solid South, the studies in this book challenge the traditional narrative that emphasizes the right-wing critique of modern America voiced by, among others, radical conservatives of the state's Democratic Party, beginning in the 1930s. As the contributors show, it is impossible to understand the Jeffersonian Democrats of 1936, the Texas Regular movement of 1944, the Dixiecrat Party of 1948, the Shivercrats of the 1950s, state members of the John Birch Society, Texas members of Young Americans for Freedom, Reagan Democrats, and most recently, even, the Tea Party movement without first understanding the underlying impulses that produced their formation." -- Publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HN79.T43 R383 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002075323

Includes bibliographical references and index.

From "Turn Texas loose" to the Tea Party: origins of the Texas Right / David O'Donald Cullen -- Texan by color: the racialization of the Lone Star state / Michael Phillips -- "The evils of socialism": the religious right in early twentieth-century Texas / Kyle G. Wilkison -- "He, being dead, yet speaketh": J. Frank Norris and the Texas religious right at midcentury / Samuel K. Tullock -- The far right in Texas politics during the Roosevelt era / Keith Volanto -- Establishing the Texas Right, 1940-1960 / George N. Green -- The paranoid style and its limits: the power, influence, and failure of the postwar Texas far right / Sean P. Cunningham -- Focus on the family: twentieth-century conservative Texas women and the Lone Star Right / Nancy E. Baker -- Texas tradition and the Right: continuity and change / Michael Lind.

"In The Texas Right: The Radical Roots of Lone Star Conservatism, some of our most accomplished and readable historians push the origins of present-day Texas conservatism back to the decade preceding the twentieth century. They illuminate the initial factors that began moving Texas to the far right, even before the arrival of the New Deal. By demonstrating that Texas politics foreshadowed the partisan realignment of the erstwhile Solid South, the studies in this book challenge the traditional narrative that emphasizes the right-wing critique of modern America voiced by, among others, radical conservatives of the state's Democratic Party, beginning in the 1930s. As the contributors show, it is impossible to understand the Jeffersonian Democrats of 1936, the Texas Regular movement of 1944, the Dixiecrat Party of 1948, the Shivercrats of the 1950s, state members of the John Birch Society, Texas members of Young Americans for Freedom, Reagan Democrats, and most recently, even, the Tea Party movement without first understanding the underlying impulses that produced their formation." -- Publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The essays comprising this fantastic anthology provide fascinating insights into the rise of Texas conservatism during the 1900s. The contributors note that Texas conservatism preceded the oft-cited appearance of post-WW II Sunbelt conservatives, pushing the movement's origins back to the radicalization of blacks after the US Civil War and the fears of Texas socialism during the early 1900s. Right-wing megachurch ministers such as J. Frank Norris mobilized Texas religious conservatives during the early 1900s, well before the better-known televangelists of the mid-20th century and prior to the economic conservatives who criticized President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal of the 1930s--all carefully analyzed in this volume. In addition, the Texas Republican Party prospered during the early 1950s, in large part by realigning itself with the anticommunist hysterics of the ultraconservative John Birch Society. In sum, each essay in this volume is indispensible in placing the modern Texas Right in its proper historical context, showing that the concerns of today's Tea Party are, in fact, little different from the concerns of conservative Texans who preceded them as far back as a century ago. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. T. P. Bowman West Texas A&M University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

DAVID O'DONALD CULLEN is a professor of history at Collin College. He coedited the award-winning volume The Texas Left: The Radical Roots of Lone Star Liberalism . KYLE G. WILKISON is also a professor of history at Collin College. He is the author of Yeomen, Sharecroppers, and Socialists: Plain Folk Protest in Texas, 1870#150;1914 and coeditor (with Cullen) of The Texas Left .<br> <br> nbsp;

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