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The Mexican Revolution : conflict and consolidation, 1910-1940 / edited by Douglas W. Richmond and Sam W. Haynes ; introduction by John Mason Hart ; contributors: Nicholas Villanueva Jr. ... [et al.].

Contributor(s): Richmond, Douglas W, 1946- | Haynes, Sam W. (Sam Walter), 1956- | Villanueva, Nicholas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Walter Prescott Webb memorial lectures: 44.Publisher: College Station : Published for the University of Texas at Arlington by Texas A&M University Press, 2013Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 251 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781603448161 (cloth : alk. paper); 1603448160 (cloth : alk. paper); 9781603449557 (ebook-c); 1603449558 (ebook-c).Subject(s): Mexico -- History -- Revolution, 1910-1920 -- Influence | Mexico -- History -- Revolution, 1910-1920 -- Political aspects | Mexico -- History -- Revolution, 1910-1920 -- Social aspects | Mexican-American Border Region -- History -- 20th century | Mexican-American Border Region -- Ethnic relations -- Political aspects -- History -- 20th century | Nationalism -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century | Mexico -- History -- 1910-1946 | Texas -- History -- 1846-1950DDC classification: 972.08/16
Contents:
The Mexican Revolution / John Mason Hart -- Decade of disorder: the execution of León Martínez Jr. and Mexican/Anglo race relations in Texas during the first four years of the Mexican Revolution / Nicholas Villanueva Jr. -- "Wire me before shooting": federalism in (in)action: the Texas-Mexico Border during the revolution, 1910-1920 / Don M. Coerver -- The rhetoric and reality of nationalism: Monterrey in the revolution / Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga -- Creating a schizophrenic border: migration and perception, 1920-1925 / Linda B. Hall -- Revolutionary Mexican nationalism and the Mexican immigrant community in Los Angeles during the Great Depression: memory, identity, and survival / Francisco E. Balderrama -- From the Caudillo to Tata Lázaro: the Maximato in perspective, 1928-1934 / Jürgen Buchenau -- Revolution without resonance? Mexico's "fiesta of bullets" and its aftermath in Chiapas, 1910-1940 / Stephen E. Lewis -- Back to centralism, 1920-1940 / Carlos Martínez Assad -- The Mexican Revolution: one century of reflections, 1910-2010 / Thomas Benjamin -- About the contributors.
Summary: "Encompassing wide-ranging and careful studies that rely on Mexican and borderlands political and social history, literature, and socioeconomic change, this volume provides a superb compendium of research on ... the Mexican Revolution....[and] suggests fertile fields of inquiry for future scholarship."
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1234 .M584 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002075349

Includes index.

The Mexican Revolution / John Mason Hart -- Decade of disorder: the execution of León Martínez Jr. and Mexican/Anglo race relations in Texas during the first four years of the Mexican Revolution / Nicholas Villanueva Jr. -- "Wire me before shooting": federalism in (in)action: the Texas-Mexico Border during the revolution, 1910-1920 / Don M. Coerver -- The rhetoric and reality of nationalism: Monterrey in the revolution / Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga -- Creating a schizophrenic border: migration and perception, 1920-1925 / Linda B. Hall -- Revolutionary Mexican nationalism and the Mexican immigrant community in Los Angeles during the Great Depression: memory, identity, and survival / Francisco E. Balderrama -- From the Caudillo to Tata Lázaro: the Maximato in perspective, 1928-1934 / Jürgen Buchenau -- Revolution without resonance? Mexico's "fiesta of bullets" and its aftermath in Chiapas, 1910-1940 / Stephen E. Lewis -- Back to centralism, 1920-1940 / Carlos Martínez Assad -- The Mexican Revolution: one century of reflections, 1910-2010 / Thomas Benjamin -- About the contributors.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Encompassing wide-ranging and careful studies that rely on Mexican and borderlands political and social history, literature, and socioeconomic change, this volume provides a superb compendium of research on ... the Mexican Revolution....[and] suggests fertile fields of inquiry for future scholarship."

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Through the work of noted Mexican historians presented at the 2010 annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lecture, editors Richmond and Haynes examine the formative period of change from the Mexican Revolution in 1910 through the Lazaro Cardenas administration in 1940. Carefully researched and written, the essays engage a broad range of issues. Many focus on the myriad ways the revolution impacted relations along the US-Mexican border, concluding that Mexico's uncertainty revealed economic instability, long-held ethnic tensions resulting in spurious legal rulings against Mexicans and Mexican Americans, and aggressive US actions to expel these groups in the 1930s. But the book attempts to do more by investigating how this period of "consolidation and conflict" produced varied experiences across Mexico. Chapters explore the theme of nationalism, arguing that there was a limited influence in Monterrey, while strong nationalist forces shaped Mexican American identification in Los Angeles. Two other essays investigate the national government's influence, concluding that Chiapas witnessed a narrow implementation of revolutionary goals, but during this period the federal state exercised broader national control. The book's ambitious goals conclude by evaluating whether "the memory and legacy of the revolution" can foster further changes in 21st-century Mexico. Summing Up: Highly recommended. The breadth of issues will appeal to graduate students and professionals. J. B. Kirkwood Colby-Sawyer College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

DOUGLAS W. RICHMOND is professor emeritus in history at the University of Texas at Arlington. He received his PhD from the University of Washington.<br> SAM W. HAYNES is a professor of history and director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington. His PhD is from the University of Houston.

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