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Thread of blood : colonialism, revolution, and gender on Mexico's northern frontier / Ana María Alonso.

By: Alonso, Ana María, 1955-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Hegemony and experience: Publisher: Tucson : University of Arizona Press, ©1995Description: xi, 303 pages : 2 maps ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0816515115; 9780816515110; 0816515743; 9780816515745.Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State) | Sierra Madre Region (Mexico) -- History | Namiquipa (Mexico) -- History | Indians of Mexico -- Wars -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State) | Government, Resistance to -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State) -- History | Social structure -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State) -- History | Chihuahua (Mexico : State) -- Social life and customs | Chihuahua (Mexico : State) Social life and customs | Frontier and pioneer life Mexico Chihuahua (State) | Government, Resistance to History Mexico Chihuahua (State) | Indians of Mexico Wars Mexico Chihuahua (State) | Namiquipa (Mexico) History | Sierra Madre Region (Mexico) History | Social structure History Mexico Chihuahua (State)DDC classification: 972/.16 Other classification: 15.85 | 15.88 | 7,26 Online resources: Table of contents Review: "This outstanding volume links the analysis of community and social organization with macro-level processes and history. Examines how gender, ethnicity, and local concepts of power relate to national identity, economy, and power. A fascinating discussion of Mexican society and the revolutionary change occurring along Mexico's northern border"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57. http://www.loc.gov/hlas
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1261 .A45 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002075554

Includes bibliographical references (pages 265-291) and index.

"This outstanding volume links the analysis of community and social organization with macro-level processes and history. Examines how gender, ethnicity, and local concepts of power relate to national identity, economy, and power. A fascinating discussion of Mexican society and the revolutionary change occurring along Mexico's northern border"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57.

http://www.loc.gov/hlas

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Friedrich Katz argued 20 years ago that the Mexican Revolution of 1910 drew unique support from the serrano peasants of northwestern Chihuahua, whose communities were created in the late 18th century as military colonies to defend the region against Apaches. Alonso, an anthropologist, probes this hypothesis by examining the history of one of these communities, Namiquipa. She uses a variety of theoretical approaches, as well as local archival materials. In tracing the evolution of an ideology of resistance that she believes had a distinctively frontier component, Alonso focuses on gender and ethnicity, arguing that both were integral to the formulation of a code of honor essential to the reproduction of Namiquipa's way of life. The Porfirian state's assault on that system is the key to understanding Namiquipans' resistance. Most of Alonso's analysis focuses on the gendered formulation of honor and communal values. Although this book represents an innovative contribution to Mexican Revolution and frontier studies, a lack of attention to class and to Mexican colonial historiography raises questions about Alonso's claims of frontier egalitarianism, and the narrow geographical focus cautions against extending its conclusions. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. M. Deeds Northern Arizona University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

A native of Cuba, Ana María Alonso is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona. Thread of Blood was published with the support of the Clara Lee Tanner Publishing Fund for the first book by an anthropologist.

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