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Rosa Parks : my story / by Rosa Parks ; with Jim Haskins.

By: Parks, Rosa, 1913-2005.
Contributor(s): Haskins, James, 1941-2005.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Dial Books, ©1992Description: 192 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0803706731; 9780803706736; 0803706758; 9780803706750.Subject(s): Parks, Rosa, 1913-2005 -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Alabama -- Montgomery -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Civil rights workers -- Alabama -- Montgomery -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Segregation in transportation -- Alabama -- Montgomery -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil rights -- Alabama -- Montgomery -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Montgomery (Ala.) -- Biography -- Juvenile literatureAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Rosa Parks.; Online version:: Rosa Parks.DDC classification: 976.1
Contents:
How it all started -- Not just another little girl -- Schooling in Montgomery -- Marriage, and activism -- We fight for the right to vote -- Secretary of the NAACP -- White violence gets worse -- "You're under arrest -- "They've messed with the wrong one now" -- Stride toward freedom -- We move to Detroit -- Years since.
Summary: When Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama bus in 1955, she sparked the Civil Rights Movement.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
976.1 P235my (Browse shelf) Available 0000002075752

Includes index.

How it all started -- Not just another little girl -- Schooling in Montgomery -- Marriage, and activism -- We fight for the right to vote -- Secretary of the NAACP -- White violence gets worse -- "You're under arrest -- "They've messed with the wrong one now" -- Stride toward freedom -- We move to Detroit -- Years since.

When Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on an Alabama bus in 1955, she sparked the Civil Rights Movement.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-- This well-known story is considerably refreshed by Parks's personal narrative, punctuated by numerous black-and-white photographs. In simple, gracious, compelling language she describes her childhood, family life, and elusive educational opportunities. She explains how her husband encouraged and supported her participation in civil rights activities, and provides with clarity the generally paltry regard for the contributions of black women by the movement's organizers. In this recounting of her life, she corrects some media-created distortions of events. Her references to so many people may overwhelm some readers at times, but this does not diminish the overall impact of a wonderful, warm autobiography.-- Helen E. Williams, formerly at University of Maryland, College Park (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She attended the Montgomery Industrial School, which emphasized domestic sciences such as cooking, sewing, and caring for the sick. She married Raymond Parks in 1932 and was one of the first women to join the Montgomery branch of the NAACP in 1943. On December 1, 1955, Parks refused to give up her seat on a city bus to a white man and was arrested and fined for violating a city ordinance. Her actions inspired 50,000 blacks in Montgomery to boycott the city buses for a year until the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the segregated busing policy was unconstitutional. <p> She moved to Detroit, Michigan with her husband in 1957 and served as a secretary/ receptionist for U.S. Representative John Conyers from 1965 to 1988. She founded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self-Development, which sponsors an annual summer bus trip around the country for teenagers to learn the history of their country and the civil rights movement. She received numerous awards during her lifetime including the NAACP's Springarn Medal in 1979, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996, and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1999. She died on October 24, 2005 at the age of 92. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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