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Neo-Calvinism and the French Revolution.

By: Eglinton, James.
Contributor(s): Harinck, George.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014Description: 1 online resource (225 p.).ISBN: 9780567656643.Subject(s): Calvinism -- Netherlands | Christianity and politics -- Calvinism | Christianity and politics -- Netherlands -- History -- 18th century | Christianity and politics -- Netherlands -- History -- 19th century | France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Influence | Netherlands -- History -- 1714-1795 | Netherlands -- History -- 1795-1815Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Neo-Calvinism and the French RevolutionDDC classification: 282.492089001 LOC classification: BX1551Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; List of Contributors; Foreword; Preface; Chapter 1 Abraham Kuyper and the French Revolution; I Introduction; II What went wrong in 1789?; III The Old Regime and counter-revolution; IV Confronting economic crisis; V What was good about revolution?; Chapter 2 Herman Bavinck and the Neo-Calvinist Concept of the French Revolution; I Introduction; II Reframing Calvinism; III Herman Bavinck and anti-revolutionary ideas; IV Bavinck's reconsideration of Groen; V Conclusion
Chapter 3 From Babel to Pentecost via Paris and Amsterdam: Multilingualism in Neo-Calvinist and Revolutionary ThoughtI Introduction; II Protestant linguistic consciousness; III Theology, language and languages; IV Language and the French Revolution; V Abraham Kuyper and multilingualism; VI Kuyper's De Gemeene Gratie on linguistics; VII Critique of Kuyper on multilingualism; VIII Herman Bavinck; IX Conclusion; Chapter 4 Revolution, Theology and the Reformed: Learning from History; I Introduction; II Burke; III Carlyle; IV Chateaubriand; V Lamennais; VI Hugo; VII The Dutch Reformed
VIIa Groen van PrinstererVIIb Kuyper; VIIc Bavinck; VIII Conclusion; Chapter 5 The Theo-Politics of Fashion: Groen van Prinsterer and the 'Terror' of French Revolutionary Dress; I Introduction; II Revolutionary fashion; III Groen and revolutionary unbelief; IV Overlap; V Re-fashioning the Revolution; Chapter 6 Long Films About Love: Kuyper and Kieślowski's Three Colours Trilogy; I Introduction; II Liberty: Blue; III Equality: White; IV Fraternity: Red; V All you need is . . . ; Chapter 7 Dutch Orthodox Protestant Parties and the Ghost of the French Revolution; I Introduction
II Fighting the ghost: Verbrugh's visionIII Fighting the ghost: Spiritual warfare; IV The ghost after 9/11 and the Arab Spring; V Conclusion; Chapter 8 Kuyper's Anti-Revolutionary Doctrine of Scripture; I Introduction; II Revolution in theology; III Kuyper's alternative; IV Evaluation; IVa Kuyper and contextual theology; IVb Implications in the twenty-first century; Chapter 9 'Marie Antoinette' or Mystical Depth?: Herman Bavinck on Theology as Queen of the Sciences; I Introduction: An outdated statement; II Inaugural address; III Reformed Dogmatics; IV Common grace; V Conclusion
Chapter 10 French Secularity and the Islamic Headscarf: A Theological DeconstructionI Introduction; II The French Revolution and Dutch Neo-Calvinism; III French laïcité and the Islamic hijab; IV A lingering question; V A sixth factor; VI Abraham Kuyper and secular constantine; Chapter 11 Another Revolution: Towards a New Explanation of the Rise of Neo-Calvinism1; I Introduction: The problematic relationship between the French Revolution and Neo-Calvinism; II Historical revolution; III First marker: Perspective; IV Second marker: Dialectic; V Third marker: Integration of religion and modernity
VI Neo-Calvinism and the historical revolution: Impact
Summary: The French Revolution was the scene of much intellectual and social upheaval. Its impact touched a wide range of subjects: the relationship of the church to the state, social relationships, science, literature, fashion, philosophy and theology. Although the French Revolution's momentum was felt across Europe and North America, it met a particularly interesting response in the Netherlands, at that time the scene of a burgeoning neo-Calvinist movement. In that context, the likes of Groen van Prinsterer, Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck responded to the French Revolution's ideals and influence i
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
BX1551 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1757568 Available EBL1757568

Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; List of Contributors; Foreword; Preface; Chapter 1 Abraham Kuyper and the French Revolution; I Introduction; II What went wrong in 1789?; III The Old Regime and counter-revolution; IV Confronting economic crisis; V What was good about revolution?; Chapter 2 Herman Bavinck and the Neo-Calvinist Concept of the French Revolution; I Introduction; II Reframing Calvinism; III Herman Bavinck and anti-revolutionary ideas; IV Bavinck's reconsideration of Groen; V Conclusion

Chapter 3 From Babel to Pentecost via Paris and Amsterdam: Multilingualism in Neo-Calvinist and Revolutionary ThoughtI Introduction; II Protestant linguistic consciousness; III Theology, language and languages; IV Language and the French Revolution; V Abraham Kuyper and multilingualism; VI Kuyper's De Gemeene Gratie on linguistics; VII Critique of Kuyper on multilingualism; VIII Herman Bavinck; IX Conclusion; Chapter 4 Revolution, Theology and the Reformed: Learning from History; I Introduction; II Burke; III Carlyle; IV Chateaubriand; V Lamennais; VI Hugo; VII The Dutch Reformed

VIIa Groen van PrinstererVIIb Kuyper; VIIc Bavinck; VIII Conclusion; Chapter 5 The Theo-Politics of Fashion: Groen van Prinsterer and the 'Terror' of French Revolutionary Dress; I Introduction; II Revolutionary fashion; III Groen and revolutionary unbelief; IV Overlap; V Re-fashioning the Revolution; Chapter 6 Long Films About Love: Kuyper and Kieślowski's Three Colours Trilogy; I Introduction; II Liberty: Blue; III Equality: White; IV Fraternity: Red; V All you need is . . . ; Chapter 7 Dutch Orthodox Protestant Parties and the Ghost of the French Revolution; I Introduction

II Fighting the ghost: Verbrugh's visionIII Fighting the ghost: Spiritual warfare; IV The ghost after 9/11 and the Arab Spring; V Conclusion; Chapter 8 Kuyper's Anti-Revolutionary Doctrine of Scripture; I Introduction; II Revolution in theology; III Kuyper's alternative; IV Evaluation; IVa Kuyper and contextual theology; IVb Implications in the twenty-first century; Chapter 9 'Marie Antoinette' or Mystical Depth?: Herman Bavinck on Theology as Queen of the Sciences; I Introduction: An outdated statement; II Inaugural address; III Reformed Dogmatics; IV Common grace; V Conclusion

Chapter 10 French Secularity and the Islamic Headscarf: A Theological DeconstructionI Introduction; II The French Revolution and Dutch Neo-Calvinism; III French laïcité and the Islamic hijab; IV A lingering question; V A sixth factor; VI Abraham Kuyper and secular constantine; Chapter 11 Another Revolution: Towards a New Explanation of the Rise of Neo-Calvinism1; I Introduction: The problematic relationship between the French Revolution and Neo-Calvinism; II Historical revolution; III First marker: Perspective; IV Second marker: Dialectic; V Third marker: Integration of religion and modernity

VI Neo-Calvinism and the historical revolution: Impact

The French Revolution was the scene of much intellectual and social upheaval. Its impact touched a wide range of subjects: the relationship of the church to the state, social relationships, science, literature, fashion, philosophy and theology. Although the French Revolution's momentum was felt across Europe and North America, it met a particularly interesting response in the Netherlands, at that time the scene of a burgeoning neo-Calvinist movement. In that context, the likes of Groen van Prinsterer, Abraham Kuyper and Herman Bavinck responded to the French Revolution's ideals and influence i

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Eglinton is Meldrum Lecturer in Reformed Theology, University of Edinburgh, UK. George Harinck is Professor of Church History at the VU University Amsterdam and Kampen Theological University, The Netherlands.

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