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When Slavery Was Called Freedom : Evangelicalism, Proslavery, and the Causes of the Civil War

By: Daly, John Patrick.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Religion in the South: Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2015Description: 1 online resource (220 p.).ISBN: 9780813158518.Subject(s): Antislavery movements -- United States --History -- 19th century | Evangelicalism -- Political aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Evangelicalism -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Moral and ethical aspects -- Southern States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Moral and ethical aspects -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Slavery -- Southern States -- Justification | Southern States -- Intellectual life | Southern States -- Moral conditions | Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1775-1865 | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- CausesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: When Slavery Was Called Freedom : Evangelicalism, Proslavery, and the Causes of the Civil WarDDC classification: 973.7/11 | 973.711 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Freedom and Evangelical Culture in the South; 2. The Post-1831 Birth of Evangelical Proslavery; 3. Answering Abolitionists, Defending Slaveholders; 4. The Evangelical Vision of the South and Its Future; 5. Evangelical Proslavery, Free Labor, and Disunion, 1850-1861; 6. The Proslavery Formula and the Test of War, 1860-1865; Epilogue; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: When Slavery Was Called Freedom uncovers the cultural and ideological bonds linking the combatants in the Civil War era and boldly reinterprets the intellectual foundations of secession. John Patrick Daly dissects the evangelical defense of slavery at the heart of the nineteenth century's sectional crisis. He brings a new understanding to the role of religion in the Old South and the ways in which religion was used in the Confederacy.Southern evangelicals argued that their unique region was destined for greatness, and their rhetoric gave expression and a degree of coherence to the grassroots assumptions of the South. The North and South shared assumptions about freedom, prosperity, and morality. For a hundred years after the Civil War, politicians and historians emphasized the South's alleged departures from national ideals. Recent studies have concluded, however, that the South was firmly rooted in mainstream moral, intellectual, and socio-economic developments and sought to compete with the North in a contemporary spirit. Daly argues that antislavery and proslavery emerged from the same evangelical roots; both Northerners and Southerners interpreted the Bible and Christian moral dictates in light of individualism and free market economics. When the abolitionist's moral critique of slavery arose after 1830, Southern evangelicals answered the charges with the strident self-assurance of recent converts. They went on to articulate how slavery fit into the "genius of the American system" and how slavery was only right as part of that system.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E449 .D23 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1915502 Available EBL1915502

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Freedom and Evangelical Culture in the South; 2. The Post-1831 Birth of Evangelical Proslavery; 3. Answering Abolitionists, Defending Slaveholders; 4. The Evangelical Vision of the South and Its Future; 5. Evangelical Proslavery, Free Labor, and Disunion, 1850-1861; 6. The Proslavery Formula and the Test of War, 1860-1865; Epilogue; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index

When Slavery Was Called Freedom uncovers the cultural and ideological bonds linking the combatants in the Civil War era and boldly reinterprets the intellectual foundations of secession. John Patrick Daly dissects the evangelical defense of slavery at the heart of the nineteenth century's sectional crisis. He brings a new understanding to the role of religion in the Old South and the ways in which religion was used in the Confederacy.Southern evangelicals argued that their unique region was destined for greatness, and their rhetoric gave expression and a degree of coherence to the grassroots assumptions of the South. The North and South shared assumptions about freedom, prosperity, and morality. For a hundred years after the Civil War, politicians and historians emphasized the South's alleged departures from national ideals. Recent studies have concluded, however, that the South was firmly rooted in mainstream moral, intellectual, and socio-economic developments and sought to compete with the North in a contemporary spirit. Daly argues that antislavery and proslavery emerged from the same evangelical roots; both Northerners and Southerners interpreted the Bible and Christian moral dictates in light of individualism and free market economics. When the abolitionist's moral critique of slavery arose after 1830, Southern evangelicals answered the charges with the strident self-assurance of recent converts. They went on to articulate how slavery fit into the "genius of the American system" and how slavery was only right as part of that system.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Daly (State Univ. of New York, Brockport) reexamines the evangelical culture of the antebellum South and how it sowed the seeds for secession and civil war. Southern evangelicalism espoused the modernizing trends of the Market Revolution, emphasizing individual responsibility and agency for all people, including slaves. Slave-based economics yielded prosperity and coincided with growing church memberships, leading Southern divines to believe that the moral and material structures of the South enjoyed God's blessing. Abolitionism was less a policy threat than a personal insult to righteous Southerners. Northern espousals of free labor ideology offended the Southern notion of the reciprocal biblical duty, which all people, including slaves, had the choice of embracing as part of their moral liberty. Secession from such morally odious ideas and people became a holy duty. Daly does not address important scholarship on secession by Michael Johnson (Toward a Patriarchal Republic, CH, Jan'78), William Freehling (The Road to Disunion, CH, Jan'91), or J. Mills Thornton (Politics and Power in a Slave Society, CH, Oct'78), nor does his emphasis on common moral values of the North and South shed light on why Northern and Southern churchmen saw themselves holding irreconcilable moral views with one another. Useful to historians and students, this is an important, but not final, word on the topic. All levels and collections. E. R. Crowther Adams State College

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