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American Romanticism and the Marketplace.

By: Gilmore, Michael T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (193 p.).ISBN: 9780226293943.Subject(s): American literature -- 1783-1850 -- History and criticism | American literature -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Authors and readers -- United States | Authors, American -- 19th century -- Biography | Electronic books. -- local | Romanticism -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Romanticism and the MarketplaceDDC classification: 810.9 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Emerson and the Persistence of the Commodity -- 2 Walden and the ""Curse of Trade"" -- 3 Hawthorne, Melville, and the Democratic Public -- 4 To Speak in the Marketplace: The Scarlet Letter -- 5 The Artist and the Marketplace in: The House of the Seven Gables -- 6 Selling One's Head: Moby-Dick -- 7 ""Bartleby, the Scrivener"" and the Transformation of the Economy -- Afterword -- Notes -- Index
Summary: ""This book can take its place on the shelf beside Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land and Leo Marx's The Machine in the Garden.""-Choice ""[Gilmore] demonstrates the profound, sustained, engagement with society embodied in the works of Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Melville. In effect, he relocates the American Renaissance where it properly belongs, at the centre of a broad social, economic, and ideological movement from the Jacksonian era to the Civil War. Basically, Gilmore's argument concerns the writers' participation in what Thoreau called 'the curse of trade.' He details their mixed resist
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS217 | PS217.R6G54 1985 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=485969 Available EBL485969

CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 Emerson and the Persistence of the Commodity -- 2 Walden and the ""Curse of Trade"" -- 3 Hawthorne, Melville, and the Democratic Public -- 4 To Speak in the Marketplace: The Scarlet Letter -- 5 The Artist and the Marketplace in: The House of the Seven Gables -- 6 Selling One's Head: Moby-Dick -- 7 ""Bartleby, the Scrivener"" and the Transformation of the Economy -- Afterword -- Notes -- Index

""This book can take its place on the shelf beside Henry Nash Smith's Virgin Land and Leo Marx's The Machine in the Garden.""-Choice ""[Gilmore] demonstrates the profound, sustained, engagement with society embodied in the works of Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Melville. In effect, he relocates the American Renaissance where it properly belongs, at the centre of a broad social, economic, and ideological movement from the Jacksonian era to the Civil War. Basically, Gilmore's argument concerns the writers' participation in what Thoreau called 'the curse of trade.' He details their mixed resist

Description based upon print version of record.

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