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Experience and Teleology in Ancient Historiography : Futures Past from Herodotus to Augustine

By: Grethlein, Jonas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: West Nyack : Cambridge University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (436 p.).ISBN: 9781107419933.Subject(s): History -- Methodology | History, Ancient -- Historiography | Rhetoric, Ancient -- HistoriographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Experience and Teleology in Ancient Historiography : Futures Past from Herodotus to AugustineDDC classification: 930.072 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Abbreviations""; ""Chapter 1 Introduction""; ""I. Experience and teleology""; ""II. From �narrative sentences� to �futures past�""; ""III. Narrative and experience""; ""�The New Romanticists�""; ""Narrative re-experience""; ""Re-experience in historiographic narrative""; ""Narrative re-experience and enargeia""; ""IV. Outline""; ""Goals""; ""Focus""; ""Synopsis""; ""Part I Experience: making the past present""; ""Chapter 2 Thucydides, The History of the Peloponnesian War""; ""I. Phormion�s double victory (2.83-92)""
""Graphic description and tense""""Internal focalization""; ""Speeches""; ""Composition""; ""II. The capitulation of Mytilene (3.25-35)""; ""Internal focalization and composition""; ""Narrative and narrated time""; ""�Sideshadowing�""; ""Indirect evaluation""; ""III. Teleology and authorial presence""; ""Chapter 3 Xenophon, Anabasis""; ""I. Graphic description and internal focalization""; ""The gaze of Cyrus""; ""Internal focalization through Xenophon""; ""II. Speeches""; ""Speeches of Clearchus and Tissaphernes""; ""Xenophon�s justificatory speeches""
""III. �Sideshadowing�: the motif of colonization""""A colony as Persian fear and last resort of the Greeks""; ""Xenophon�s aspirations as oecist""; ""IV. Narrative closure and historical telos""; ""Nostos and narrative dynamic""; ""False endings""; ""Nostos dissipated""; ""V. The limits of mimesis""; ""Distribution of knowledge and prolepsis""; ""Narratorial interventions and ambiguity""; ""Source citations""; ""VI. Xenophon, epigone of Thucydides?""; ""Chapter 4 Plutarch, Alexander""; ""I. Enargeia in the Gaugamela narrative""; ""Narrative speed""; ""Internal focalization""
""Further vivid scenes""""II. The drama of Alexander""; ""Theatre and self-fashioning""; ""Concern with fame""; ""Play-acting and reality""; ""III. Plutarch�s narratorial presence""; ""Digressions and references to the present""; ""Citations and alternative versions""; ""IV. Foreshadowing and teleology""; ""Foreshadowing""; ""Teleology: capture of Persia""; ""Alexander and other Lives""; ""V. Episodic structure""; ""Episodic structure and teleology""; ""Episodic structure and experience""; ""Vividness and teleology: the taming of Bucephalas""; ""VI. Enargeia and moralism""
""The spatial notion of Plutarch�s narrative""""Spatial narrative and moralism""; ""Chapter 5 Tacitus, Annals""; ""I. Germanicus� visit to the Teutoburg Forest""; ""Mimesis""; ""Mimesis reflected""; ""II. Ambiguity as mimetic device (i): the death of Germanicus""; ""An emperor�s intrigue?""; ""Investigating Germanicus� death""; ""Tiberius and Tacitus""; ""III. Ambiguity as mimetic device (ii): the Pisonian Conspiracy""; ""�Sideshadowing�""; ""Art and life""; ""Narratorial uncertainty""; ""IV. Teleology in the Annals- the Annals as telos""; ""Prolepses and teleology""
""Historiography as telos""
Summary: The past is narrated in retrospect. Historians can either capitalize on the benefit of hindsight and give their narratives a strongly teleological design or they may try to render the past as it was experienced by historical agents and contemporaries. This book explores the fundamental tension between experience and teleology in major works of Greek and Roman historiography, biography and autobiography. The combination of theoretical reflections with close readings yields a new, often surprising assessment of the history of ancient historiography as well as a deeper understanding of such autho
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D56 .G74 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1394586 Available EBL1394586

""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Abbreviations""; ""Chapter 1 Introduction""; ""I. Experience and teleology""; ""II. From �narrative sentences� to �futures past�""; ""III. Narrative and experience""; ""�The New Romanticists�""; ""Narrative re-experience""; ""Re-experience in historiographic narrative""; ""Narrative re-experience and enargeia""; ""IV. Outline""; ""Goals""; ""Focus""; ""Synopsis""; ""Part I Experience: making the past present""; ""Chapter 2 Thucydides, The History of the Peloponnesian War""; ""I. Phormion�s double victory (2.83-92)""

""Graphic description and tense""""Internal focalization""; ""Speeches""; ""Composition""; ""II. The capitulation of Mytilene (3.25-35)""; ""Internal focalization and composition""; ""Narrative and narrated time""; ""�Sideshadowing�""; ""Indirect evaluation""; ""III. Teleology and authorial presence""; ""Chapter 3 Xenophon, Anabasis""; ""I. Graphic description and internal focalization""; ""The gaze of Cyrus""; ""Internal focalization through Xenophon""; ""II. Speeches""; ""Speeches of Clearchus and Tissaphernes""; ""Xenophon�s justificatory speeches""

""III. �Sideshadowing�: the motif of colonization""""A colony as Persian fear and last resort of the Greeks""; ""Xenophon�s aspirations as oecist""; ""IV. Narrative closure and historical telos""; ""Nostos and narrative dynamic""; ""False endings""; ""Nostos dissipated""; ""V. The limits of mimesis""; ""Distribution of knowledge and prolepsis""; ""Narratorial interventions and ambiguity""; ""Source citations""; ""VI. Xenophon, epigone of Thucydides?""; ""Chapter 4 Plutarch, Alexander""; ""I. Enargeia in the Gaugamela narrative""; ""Narrative speed""; ""Internal focalization""

""Further vivid scenes""""II. The drama of Alexander""; ""Theatre and self-fashioning""; ""Concern with fame""; ""Play-acting and reality""; ""III. Plutarch�s narratorial presence""; ""Digressions and references to the present""; ""Citations and alternative versions""; ""IV. Foreshadowing and teleology""; ""Foreshadowing""; ""Teleology: capture of Persia""; ""Alexander and other Lives""; ""V. Episodic structure""; ""Episodic structure and teleology""; ""Episodic structure and experience""; ""Vividness and teleology: the taming of Bucephalas""; ""VI. Enargeia and moralism""

""The spatial notion of Plutarch�s narrative""""Spatial narrative and moralism""; ""Chapter 5 Tacitus, Annals""; ""I. Germanicus� visit to the Teutoburg Forest""; ""Mimesis""; ""Mimesis reflected""; ""II. Ambiguity as mimetic device (i): the death of Germanicus""; ""An emperor�s intrigue?""; ""Investigating Germanicus� death""; ""Tiberius and Tacitus""; ""III. Ambiguity as mimetic device (ii): the Pisonian Conspiracy""; ""�Sideshadowing�""; ""Art and life""; ""Narratorial uncertainty""; ""IV. Teleology in the Annals- the Annals as telos""; ""Prolepses and teleology""

""Historiography as telos""

The past is narrated in retrospect. Historians can either capitalize on the benefit of hindsight and give their narratives a strongly teleological design or they may try to render the past as it was experienced by historical agents and contemporaries. This book explores the fundamental tension between experience and teleology in major works of Greek and Roman historiography, biography and autobiography. The combination of theoretical reflections with close readings yields a new, often surprising assessment of the history of ancient historiography as well as a deeper understanding of such autho

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