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Secret Intelligence in the European States System, 1918-1989.

By: Haslam, Jonathan.
Contributor(s): Urbach, Karina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Palo Alto : Stanford University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (255 p.).ISBN: 9780804788915.Subject(s): Europe -- Foreign relations -- 1918-1945 | Europe -- Foreign relations -- 1945- | Intelligence service -- Europe -- History -- 20th century | Secret service -- Europe -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Secret Intelligence in the European States System, 1918-1989DDC classification: 327.124009/04 | 327.12400904 LOC classification: D424D424 .S37 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Contents ""; ""Contributors ""; ""Introduction: The Role of Secret Intelligence in the International Relations of Europe in the Twentieth Century / Jonathan Haslam and Karina Urbach ""; ""1. ""Humint"" by Default and the Problem of Trust: Soviet Intelligence, 1917 - 1941 / Jonathan Haslam ""; ""2. Barbarossa and the Bomb: Two Cases of Soviet Intelligence in World War II / David Holloway ""; ""3. Seeking a Scapegoat: Intelligence and Grand Strategy in France, 1919 - 1940 / Stephen A. Schuker ""; ""4. French Intelligence About the East, 1945 - 1968 / Georges-Henri Soutou ""
""5. British Intelligence During the Cold War / Richard J. Aldrich """"6. The Stasi Confronts Western Strategies for Transformation, 1966 - 1975 / Oliver Bange ""; ""7. The West German Secret Services During the Cold War / Holger Afflerbach ""; ""Index ""
Summary: The history of secret intelligence, like secret intelligence itself, is fraught with difficulties surrounding both the reliability and completeness of the sources, and the motivations behind their release-which can be the product of ongoing propaganda efforts as well as competition among agencies. Indeed, these difficulties lead to the Scylla and Charybdis of overestimating the importance of secret intelligence for foreign policy and statecraft and also underestimating its importance in these same areas-problems that generally beset the actual use of secret intelligence in modern states. But i
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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D424 | D424 .S37 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1495875 Available EBL1495875

""Contents ""; ""Contributors ""; ""Introduction: The Role of Secret Intelligence in the International Relations of Europe in the Twentieth Century / Jonathan Haslam and Karina Urbach ""; ""1. ""Humint"" by Default and the Problem of Trust: Soviet Intelligence, 1917 - 1941 / Jonathan Haslam ""; ""2. Barbarossa and the Bomb: Two Cases of Soviet Intelligence in World War II / David Holloway ""; ""3. Seeking a Scapegoat: Intelligence and Grand Strategy in France, 1919 - 1940 / Stephen A. Schuker ""; ""4. French Intelligence About the East, 1945 - 1968 / Georges-Henri Soutou ""

""5. British Intelligence During the Cold War / Richard J. Aldrich """"6. The Stasi Confronts Western Strategies for Transformation, 1966 - 1975 / Oliver Bange ""; ""7. The West German Secret Services During the Cold War / Holger Afflerbach ""; ""Index ""

The history of secret intelligence, like secret intelligence itself, is fraught with difficulties surrounding both the reliability and completeness of the sources, and the motivations behind their release-which can be the product of ongoing propaganda efforts as well as competition among agencies. Indeed, these difficulties lead to the Scylla and Charybdis of overestimating the importance of secret intelligence for foreign policy and statecraft and also underestimating its importance in these same areas-problems that generally beset the actual use of secret intelligence in modern states. But i

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This worthy essay collection examines the relatively under-studied history of secret intelligence in France, East and West Germany, Britain, and Stalin's Russia. The book's unifying theme is the importance of evaluating intelligence in a broader context. To avoid exaggerating or undervaluing intelligence's role in affairs of state, the contributors take an interdisciplinary approach. The essays reveal that political, ideological, financial, technological, and cultural constraints affected how secret information was gathered and used. Most notably, coeditor Haslam and David Holloway both contend that accurate intelligence mattered little, because Stalin's paranoia and predilections ultimately determined Soviet policies. Similarly, Stephan Schuker persuasively argues that intelligence failures did not lead to the French defeat in 1940. By his account, France's complete political and military collapse rendered secret intelligence irrelevant. Richard Aldrich's contribution also stands out for its assessment of postwar British intelligence in light of the tough choices forced upon the spy agencies by budgetary restrictions. As a whole, the collection provides a useful reminder that secret intelligence does not operate in a vacuum. Nor should the scholarly study of intelligence. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. C. Kennedy York College of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jonathan Haslam is Professor of the History of International Relations at Cambridge University.Karina Urbach is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research, University of London.

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