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What Women Want : An Agenda for the Women's Movement

By: Rhode, Deborah L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (247 p.).ISBN: 9780199348282.Subject(s): Feminism | Women -- United States -- History | Women -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: What Women Want : An Agenda for the Women's MovementDDC classification: 305.40973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover ""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1. The Women�s Movement""; ""2. Employment""; ""3. Work and Family""; ""4. Sex and Marriage""; ""5. Reproductive Justice and Economic Security""; ""6. Sexual Abuse""; ""7. Appearance""; ""8. The Politics of Progress""; ""Notes""; ""Index""
Summary: American women fare worse than men on virtually every major dimension of social status, financial well-being, and physical safety. Sexual violence remains common, and reproductive rights are by no means secure. Women assume disproportionate burdens in the home and pay a heavy price in the workplace. Yet these issues are not political priorities. Nor is there a consensus that there still is a serious problem. In What Women Want, Deborah L. Rhode, one of the nation's leading scholars on women and law, brings to the discussion a broad array of interdisciplinary research as well as interviews with
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1410 .R384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1745808 Available EBL1745808

""Cover ""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1. The Women�s Movement""; ""2. Employment""; ""3. Work and Family""; ""4. Sex and Marriage""; ""5. Reproductive Justice and Economic Security""; ""6. Sexual Abuse""; ""7. Appearance""; ""8. The Politics of Progress""; ""Notes""; ""Index""

American women fare worse than men on virtually every major dimension of social status, financial well-being, and physical safety. Sexual violence remains common, and reproductive rights are by no means secure. Women assume disproportionate burdens in the home and pay a heavy price in the workplace. Yet these issues are not political priorities. Nor is there a consensus that there still is a serious problem. In What Women Want, Deborah L. Rhode, one of the nation's leading scholars on women and law, brings to the discussion a broad array of interdisciplinary research as well as interviews with

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This volume offers a comprehensive overview of the state of the women's movement in the US. Rhode's engagement across traditional disciplinary boundaries allows her to address multiple dimensions of the public and private spheres. As such, the book is an excellent starting point for readers new to the topic and a reminder to activists and scholars of the interconnectedness of women's issues. The expert use of academic and popular sources fosters a clear-eyed analysis backed by illustrative examples, which demonstrate the relevance of the issues tackled. In addition to supplying a well-researched snapshot, Rhode offers prescriptions for a way forward for the women's movement. The mutually reinforcing relationship between legal requirements and cultural norms is among the most important points made in the suggested reforms. Indeed, the attention to both public policy and individual attitudes is a key element in any attempt at social change. One drawback of the volume is that events have eclipsed the discussion of several topics. However, this book is worthy of consideration by all interested in a nuanced account of the women's movement's present and future. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Timothy Lynch, University of St. Thomas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, Stanford University

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