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Deeply Divided : Racial Politics and Social Movements in Post-War America

By: McAdam, Doug.
Contributor(s): Kloos, Karina.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (412 p.).ISBN: 9780199937868.Subject(s): Democracy -- United States | Equality -- United States | United States -- Politics and government | United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Deeply Divided : Racial Politics and Social Movements in Post-War AmericaDDC classification: 973.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover""; ""Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America""; ""Copyright""; ""Dedication""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""DEEPLY DIVIDED""; ""1: How Did We Get into This Mess?""; ""On Parties, Movements, and the Rise and Fall of the Median Voter""; ""The Narrow Face of Partisan Polarization""; ""Solving the “Convergence� Puzzle: The Rise of Movement Politics and the Marginalization of the Medium Voter""; ""Moment 1: The Revitalized Civil Rights Struggle and the Collapse of the New Deal Coalition""
""Moment 2: Courting Segregationists�The GOP and Its Southern Strategy""""Moment 3: Barbarians inside the Gate and the Primary Reforms of 1970�72""; ""Plan for the Book""; ""2: Postwar America: Bipartisan Consensus, the Median Voter, and the Absence of Social Movements""; ""The Triumph of the Center""; ""The Emerging Consensus""; ""Communism""; ""Civil Rights""; ""The American Welfare State""; ""Toward a More Inclusive and Egalitarian Society""; ""The Absence of Postwar Dissent""; ""Summing Up""
""3: The Center Will Not Hold The 1960s and the Shifting Racial Geography of American Politics""""The Civil Rights Revolution""; ""The Solid South, the Party of Lincoln, and the Geography of Race, 1876�1960""; ""The Cold War and the Renationalization of Race""; ""The Dixiecrat Revolt""; ""Kennedy, the Revitalized Movement, and the Dixiecrat Revolt Revisited""; ""Freedom Summer and the Convention Challenge""; ""The GOP Looks South and Moves Right""; ""Thunder on the Right: The Draft Goldwater Movement""; ""The Shift Begins""; ""“White Backlash�""; ""White Resistance Spreads Northward""
""Courting Racial Conservatives: Nixon�s First Term in Office""""Summing Up""; ""4: The Strange, Consequential Seventies""; ""The Little Revolution That Could""; ""Prelude to Revolt""; ""Let the Revolution Begin""; ""The Commission Process""; ""Constituting the Commission""; ""Implementation""; ""Marginalizing Parties and Empowering Movements""; ""The Democrat�s Tea Party Moment: 1968�1972""; ""The “Anti-Establishment� Politics of the 1976 Election""; ""The Mobilization of Capital and the Demobilization of Labor""; ""Summing Up""; ""5: The Reagan Revolution?""
""Movement Politics in Reagan�s Rise to Power""""1980 and the Hybrid Movement-Party Form""; ""The Reagan Presidency: A Revolution in Name Only""; ""Reagan�s Legacy and Posthumous Revolution""; ""The Immediate Economic Impact of the Reagan Presidency""; ""Summing Up""; ""6: The Slow-Release Revolution: 1988�2008""; ""The Reagan Rebranding of the Republican Party and the Widening Partisan Divide""; ""The GOP after Reagan: Taking a Hard Right""; ""Reagan�s Successors: More Reagan than Reagan""; ""Rising Inequality and the Reagan Policy Regime""; ""Redefining Policy Expectations""
""Inequality in Contemporary America: “It�s [Not Just] the Economy Stupid�""
Summary: By many measures--commonsensical or statistical--the United States has not been more divided politically or economically in the last hundred years than it is now. How have we gone from the striking bipartisan cooperation and relative economic equality of the war years and post-war period to the extreme inequality and savage partisan divisions of today? In this sweeping look at American politics from the Depression to the present, Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos argue that party politics alone is not responsible for the mess we find ourselves in. Instead, it was the ongoing interaction of social m
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.A1 .M384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1746855 Available EBL1746855

""Cover""; ""Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Postwar America""; ""Copyright""; ""Dedication""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""DEEPLY DIVIDED""; ""1: How Did We Get into This Mess?""; ""On Parties, Movements, and the Rise and Fall of the Median Voter""; ""The Narrow Face of Partisan Polarization""; ""Solving the “Convergence� Puzzle: The Rise of Movement Politics and the Marginalization of the Medium Voter""; ""Moment 1: The Revitalized Civil Rights Struggle and the Collapse of the New Deal Coalition""

""Moment 2: Courting Segregationists�The GOP and Its Southern Strategy""""Moment 3: Barbarians inside the Gate and the Primary Reforms of 1970�72""; ""Plan for the Book""; ""2: Postwar America: Bipartisan Consensus, the Median Voter, and the Absence of Social Movements""; ""The Triumph of the Center""; ""The Emerging Consensus""; ""Communism""; ""Civil Rights""; ""The American Welfare State""; ""Toward a More Inclusive and Egalitarian Society""; ""The Absence of Postwar Dissent""; ""Summing Up""

""3: The Center Will Not Hold The 1960s and the Shifting Racial Geography of American Politics""""The Civil Rights Revolution""; ""The Solid South, the Party of Lincoln, and the Geography of Race, 1876�1960""; ""The Cold War and the Renationalization of Race""; ""The Dixiecrat Revolt""; ""Kennedy, the Revitalized Movement, and the Dixiecrat Revolt Revisited""; ""Freedom Summer and the Convention Challenge""; ""The GOP Looks South and Moves Right""; ""Thunder on the Right: The Draft Goldwater Movement""; ""The Shift Begins""; ""“White Backlash�""; ""White Resistance Spreads Northward""

""Courting Racial Conservatives: Nixon�s First Term in Office""""Summing Up""; ""4: The Strange, Consequential Seventies""; ""The Little Revolution That Could""; ""Prelude to Revolt""; ""Let the Revolution Begin""; ""The Commission Process""; ""Constituting the Commission""; ""Implementation""; ""Marginalizing Parties and Empowering Movements""; ""The Democrat�s Tea Party Moment: 1968�1972""; ""The “Anti-Establishment� Politics of the 1976 Election""; ""The Mobilization of Capital and the Demobilization of Labor""; ""Summing Up""; ""5: The Reagan Revolution?""

""Movement Politics in Reagan�s Rise to Power""""1980 and the Hybrid Movement-Party Form""; ""The Reagan Presidency: A Revolution in Name Only""; ""Reagan�s Legacy and Posthumous Revolution""; ""The Immediate Economic Impact of the Reagan Presidency""; ""Summing Up""; ""6: The Slow-Release Revolution: 1988�2008""; ""The Reagan Rebranding of the Republican Party and the Widening Partisan Divide""; ""The GOP after Reagan: Taking a Hard Right""; ""Reagan�s Successors: More Reagan than Reagan""; ""Rising Inequality and the Reagan Policy Regime""; ""Redefining Policy Expectations""

""Inequality in Contemporary America: “It�s [Not Just] the Economy Stupid�""

By many measures--commonsensical or statistical--the United States has not been more divided politically or economically in the last hundred years than it is now. How have we gone from the striking bipartisan cooperation and relative economic equality of the war years and post-war period to the extreme inequality and savage partisan divisions of today? In this sweeping look at American politics from the Depression to the present, Doug McAdam and Karina Kloos argue that party politics alone is not responsible for the mess we find ourselves in. Instead, it was the ongoing interaction of social m

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Sociologists McAdam and Kloos seek to explain how U.S. politics moved from the post-World War II era of bipartisanship and economic stability to a time as politically divisive as Reconstruction and more economically unequal than the Great Depression. Through a sweeping analysis of the interaction among race, region, and social movements, the authors make a strong case for how the combined force of the three pushed today's political parties to their ideological edges. Using a solid collection of sources and data, the authors show how, for instance, the pro-life movement, the Christian Right, and the nationwide tax revolt contributed to Ronald Reagan's rise to and Jimmy Carter's eviction from the White House. Despite the complex and multifaceted topic, this title is a fascinating and enlightening look at the contemporary political quagmire. Of note are the chapters on Reagan and the "slow-release revolution" stemming from his admirable communication skills and influence. -VERDICT Although this is a scholarly work, the authors' interdisciplinary approach, -thorough explanations, and accessible writing style, coupled with their fresh analysis of modern American politics make it a satisfying choice for both general readers and scholars.-Lisa Ennis, Univ. of -Alabama at Birmingham Lib. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Inequality and racism are brought to the forefront in this analysis of current political divides in the US. Beginning with the Obama presidency and reaching back to the Great Depression, McAdam and Kloos (both, Stanford Univ.) explain the current political condition. They argue that the dividing force is inequality linked to considerations such as race, which have come to play a particularly important role in critiques of the Obama presidency. The book is timely. It anticipates the 2014 midterm elections with reasonable accuracy and suggests where the US might be going from here. Surprisingly, Hillary Clinton is mentioned only twice, both times in terms of the 2008 election. Nevertheless, this book is a valuable source for thinking about the next federal election. The aspirations of the book-to explore the challenges the current polarized condition presents to a robust and bipartisan democratic process-are as noble as they are likely to be subsumed by the passionate politics generated by the first serious female candidate in American history, a candidate who must negotiate this partisanship with the very characteristics that make it challenging. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and university students at all levels. --John Brigham, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Doug McAdam is the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and a former Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.Karina Kloos is a scholar of political sociology and social movements at Stanford University, where she is a PhD candidate.

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