Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Cinema Civil Rights : Regulation, Repression, and Race in the Classical Hollywood Era

By: Scott, Ellen C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New Brunswick : Rutgers University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (268 p.).ISBN: 9780813571379.Subject(s): African American political activists -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | African Americans in motion pictures | African Americans in the motion picture industry -- History -- 20th century | Motion picture industry -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Motion pictures -- Censorship -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Motion pictures -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Racism in motion picturesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Cinema Civil Rights : Regulation, Repression, and Race in the Classical Hollywood EraDDC classification: 791.43 | 791.43652996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Title Page ""; ""Copyright ""; ""Contents ""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1. Regulating Race, Structuring Absence""; ""2. State Censorship and the Color Line""; ""3. Racial Trauma, Civil Rights, and the Brutal Imagination of Darryl F. Zanuck""; ""4. Shadowboxing""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""; ""Index""; ""About the Author""
Summary: From Al Jolson in blackface to Song of the South, there is a long history of racism in Hollywood film. Yet as early as the 1930s, movie studios carefully vetted their releases, removing racially offensive language like the "N-word." This censorship did not stem from purely humanitarian concerns, but rather from worries about boycotts from civil rights groups and loss of revenue from African American filmgoers.Cinema Civil Rights presents the untold history of how Black audiences, activists, and lobbyists influenced the representation of race in Hollywood in the decades before the 1960s civil r
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1995.9 .N4 S35 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1888026 Available EBL1888026

""Title Page ""; ""Copyright ""; ""Contents ""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1. Regulating Race, Structuring Absence""; ""2. State Censorship and the Color Line""; ""3. Racial Trauma, Civil Rights, and the Brutal Imagination of Darryl F. Zanuck""; ""4. Shadowboxing""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""; ""Index""; ""About the Author""

From Al Jolson in blackface to Song of the South, there is a long history of racism in Hollywood film. Yet as early as the 1930s, movie studios carefully vetted their releases, removing racially offensive language like the "N-word." This censorship did not stem from purely humanitarian concerns, but rather from worries about boycotts from civil rights groups and loss of revenue from African American filmgoers.Cinema Civil Rights presents the untold history of how Black audiences, activists, and lobbyists influenced the representation of race in Hollywood in the decades before the 1960s civil r

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In exploring "civil rights on the American screen" during the classical Hollywood era, Scott (Queens College, CUNY) moves beyond filmic representations to examine those who regulated the industry--e.g., the Production Code Administration (PCA), state film censorship boards, and the motion picture studios themselves, which engaged in what she terms a "system of vetting." Through their regulation of the industry, these forces succeeded in repressing even racially progressive representations of civil rights. What makes Scott's work stand out is that she examines rarely seen films and delves deep into the resources: PCA records, studio files, NAACP documents, African American newspapers. She argues that civil rights issues in this era manifested primarily in films related to lynching (e.g., Fury), social equality (One Mile from Heaven), and miscegenation (The Foxes of Harrow). Because it explores films not readily accessible (and about which little is known) and civil rights struggles seldom interrogated, this book is a significant contribution to the literature. Scott concludes that although the regulation systems she discusses no longer exist, "The continuation of minstrelsy and dominance of a relatively narrow formula" governs "narratives of black life in most Hollywood films." That said, she argues that independent films hold promise for depicting, reflecting, and exposing contemporary civil rights issues. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. --Charlene B. Regester, Univ. of North Carolina--Chapel Hill

Author notes provided by Syndetics

ELLEN C. SCOTT is an assistant professor of media studies at Queens College-City University of New York.nbsp;

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.