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Community at Risk : Biodefense and the Collective Search for Security

By: Beamish, Thomas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.High Reliability and Crisis Management: Publisher: Redwood City : Stanford University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (276 p.).ISBN: 9780804794657.Subject(s): Biological laboratories -- United States -- Public opinion -- Case studies | Biosecurity -- United States -- Public opinion -- Case studies | Bioterrorism -- Prevention -- Research -- Public opinion -- Case studies | Local government -- United States -- Case studies | Public opinion -- United States -- Case studies | Risk management -- Political aspects -- United States -- Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Community at Risk : Biodefense and the Collective Search for SecurityDDC classification: 363.325/360973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: In 2001, following the events of September 11 and the Anthrax attacks, the United States government began an aggressive campaign to secure the nation against biological catastrophe. Its agenda included building National Biocontainment Laboratories (NBLs), secure facilities intended for research on biodefense applications, at participating universities around the country. In Community at Risk, Thomas D. Beamish examines the civic response to local universities' plans to develop NBLs in three communities: Roxbury, MA; Davis, CA; and Galveston, TX. At a time when the country's anxiety over its se
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HD61 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2002077 Available EBL2002077

In 2001, following the events of September 11 and the Anthrax attacks, the United States government began an aggressive campaign to secure the nation against biological catastrophe. Its agenda included building National Biocontainment Laboratories (NBLs), secure facilities intended for research on biodefense applications, at participating universities around the country. In Community at Risk, Thomas D. Beamish examines the civic response to local universities' plans to develop NBLs in three communities: Roxbury, MA; Davis, CA; and Galveston, TX. At a time when the country's anxiety over its se

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The title and subtitle of Beamish's intriguing new book might lead casual readers to assume it is yet another treatise on the threat terrorists with weapons of mass destruction pose. But between the covers, readers will find something much more useful: an analysis of the ways in which different communities assess risk and respond to perceived threats. Scholars have extensively examined risk assessment at the micro level (individuals) and the macro level (large groups and nations), but very little has been done on community-level assessment. Beamish (sociology, Univ. of California, Davis) compares case studies of three communities chosen to host federally funded National Biocontainment Laboratories in 2003 and notes how community members responded to the prospect of having critical biodefense research conducted so close to home. The three communities--Davis, CA; Roxbury, MA; and Galveston, TX--responded quite differently, ranging from vehement rejection to eager acceptance. Beamish capably examines the demographic, economic, and cultural factors that produced such disparate community reactions to nearly identical circumstances. His well-supported findings have significant application to the broader science of risk assessment and management. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. --Robert D. Stacey, Saint Constantine College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas D. Beamish is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of Silent Spill: The Organization of an Industrial Crisis .

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