Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Sailing the Water's Edge : The Domestic Politics of American Foreign Policy

By: Milner, Helen V.
Contributor(s): Tingley, Dustin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (349 p.).ISBN: 9781400873821.Subject(s): Executive power--United States | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Government / General | POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / Diplomacy | POLITICAL SCIENCE / International Relations / General | Presidents--United States--Decision making | United States--Foreign relations--1989- | United States--Foreign relations--Decision making | United States--Military policy--Decision makingGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sailing the Water's Edge : The Domestic Politics of American Foreign PolicyDDC classification: 327.73 LOC classification: JZ1480Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- CONTENTS -- List of Tables -- List of Figures -- Preface -- 1 INTRODUCTION -- Motivation and Focus -- Core Contributions -- What Is Foreign Policy? -- Presidential Power in Foreign Policy -- Overview of Our Theory -- Implications for US Foreign Policy -- Organization of the Book -- Conclusion -- 2 A THEORY OF PRESIDENTIAL POWER AND US FOREIGN POLICY -- Foreign Policy Instruments -- Distributive Politics and US Foreign Policy -- Political Ideology and the Extent of Ideological Divisions over US Foreign Policy -- Connecting to Policy Substitution
Hypotheses: Presidential Influence and the Characteristics of Policy Instruments -- Alternative Explanations -- Conclusion -- 3 FOLLOW THE SAND DOLLARS: Interest Groups and American Foreign Policy Instruments -- What Are Interest Groups and What Do They Do? -- Testimony and Lobbying Data about Interest Groups across Foreign Policy Instruments -- Interest Groups and International Engagement -- Who Gets Lobbied? -- Conclusion -- 4 FROM THE FLOOR TO THE SHORE: Budget Politics and Roll Call Voting on US Foreign Policy -- When Do Presidents Get the Budgets They Request?
The Voting-Legislating Connection -- Conclusion -- 5 CONTROLLING THE SAND CASTLE: The Design and Control of US Foreign Policy Agencies -- Institutional Design -- Analyzing Bureaucratic Control -- Case Studies -- Implications for Substitution -- Conclusion -- 6 THE VIEW FROM THE PUBLIC BEACH: Presidential Power and Substitution in American Public Opinion -- Public Opinion and Foreign Policy -- Chapter Outline -- The Role of the President: Information and Impact -- Ideological Divisions and Substitution across Foreign Policy Instruments -- Conclusion
7 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, 1993-2009: A Case Study of Policy Instrument Politics and Substitution -- Sub-Saharan Africa Policy (1993-2001): The Clinton Years -- Sub-Saharan Africa Policy during the George W. Bush Administration (2001-2009) -- Conclusion -- 8 CONCLUSIONS -- Our Argument and Findings -- Important Implications for IR Theory -- Domestic Politics, Foreign Policy, Polarization, and Bipartisanship -- How Does Our Argument Apply to Other Countries? -- Limitations and Future Research -- Implications for American Foreign Policy -- Works Cited -- Index
Summary: When engaging with other countries, the U.S. government has a number of different policy instruments at its disposal, including foreign aid, international trade, and the use of military force. But what determines which policies are chosen? Does the United States rely too much on the use of military power and coercion in its foreign policies? Sailing the Water's Edge focuses on how domestic U.S. politics-in particular the interactions between the president, Congress, interest groups, bureaucratic institutions, and the public-have influenced foreign policy choices since World War II and shows wh
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JZ1480 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2028329 Available EBL2028329

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- CONTENTS -- List of Tables -- List of Figures -- Preface -- 1 INTRODUCTION -- Motivation and Focus -- Core Contributions -- What Is Foreign Policy? -- Presidential Power in Foreign Policy -- Overview of Our Theory -- Implications for US Foreign Policy -- Organization of the Book -- Conclusion -- 2 A THEORY OF PRESIDENTIAL POWER AND US FOREIGN POLICY -- Foreign Policy Instruments -- Distributive Politics and US Foreign Policy -- Political Ideology and the Extent of Ideological Divisions over US Foreign Policy -- Connecting to Policy Substitution

Hypotheses: Presidential Influence and the Characteristics of Policy Instruments -- Alternative Explanations -- Conclusion -- 3 FOLLOW THE SAND DOLLARS: Interest Groups and American Foreign Policy Instruments -- What Are Interest Groups and What Do They Do? -- Testimony and Lobbying Data about Interest Groups across Foreign Policy Instruments -- Interest Groups and International Engagement -- Who Gets Lobbied? -- Conclusion -- 4 FROM THE FLOOR TO THE SHORE: Budget Politics and Roll Call Voting on US Foreign Policy -- When Do Presidents Get the Budgets They Request?

The Voting-Legislating Connection -- Conclusion -- 5 CONTROLLING THE SAND CASTLE: The Design and Control of US Foreign Policy Agencies -- Institutional Design -- Analyzing Bureaucratic Control -- Case Studies -- Implications for Substitution -- Conclusion -- 6 THE VIEW FROM THE PUBLIC BEACH: Presidential Power and Substitution in American Public Opinion -- Public Opinion and Foreign Policy -- Chapter Outline -- The Role of the President: Information and Impact -- Ideological Divisions and Substitution across Foreign Policy Instruments -- Conclusion

7 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, 1993-2009: A Case Study of Policy Instrument Politics and Substitution -- Sub-Saharan Africa Policy (1993-2001): The Clinton Years -- Sub-Saharan Africa Policy during the George W. Bush Administration (2001-2009) -- Conclusion -- 8 CONCLUSIONS -- Our Argument and Findings -- Important Implications for IR Theory -- Domestic Politics, Foreign Policy, Polarization, and Bipartisanship -- How Does Our Argument Apply to Other Countries? -- Limitations and Future Research -- Implications for American Foreign Policy -- Works Cited -- Index

When engaging with other countries, the U.S. government has a number of different policy instruments at its disposal, including foreign aid, international trade, and the use of military force. But what determines which policies are chosen? Does the United States rely too much on the use of military power and coercion in its foreign policies? Sailing the Water's Edge focuses on how domestic U.S. politics-in particular the interactions between the president, Congress, interest groups, bureaucratic institutions, and the public-have influenced foreign policy choices since World War II and shows wh

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Milner (Princeton Univ.) and Tingley (Harvard Univ.) provide a thorough examination of how presidential power in foreign policy is contingent on relations with domestic actors (Congress, interest groups, and the public). Their book is a welcome addition to the literature as the dominant assumption is that presidents are impervious to domestic pressure. The authors contribute to the foreign policy literature by explaining how foreign policy tools available to presidents are contingent on the distributional impact of a policy and its degree of ideological division. In chapter 2, Milner and Tingley broach the question and present a theory. Chapters 3 through 6 explore each domestic actor in greater detail with examples to support their premise. Chapter 7 is by far the most interesting, as it compares US foreign policy in sub-Saharan Africa under the Clinton and Bush administrations. Milner and Tingley demonstrate that presidents often select foreign policy instruments they can control. This case study illustrates that, irrespective of party, the foreign policies of Clinton and Bush were over-reliant on the military. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Emily Acevedo, California State University, Los Angeles

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Helen V. Milner is the B.C. Forbes Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. Her books include Votes, Vetoes, and the Political Economy of International Trade Agreements and Interests, Institutions, and Information (both Princeton). Dustin Tingley is professor of government at Harvard University.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.