Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Byron's Letters and Journals : A New Selection

By: Lansdown, Richard.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (551 p.).ISBN: 9780191044762.Subject(s): Byron, George Gordon Byron, -- Baron, -- 1788-1824 -- Diaries | Byron, George Gordon Byron, -- Baron, -- 1788-1824 | Poets, English -- 19th century -- CorrespondenceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Byron's Letters and Journals : A New SelectionDDC classification: 821.7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Alongside Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters, and Oscar Wilde, Lord Byron possesses a star-quality unlike other classic British authors. His life as poet, philanderer, homosexual, and freedom fighter is legendary, and this new selection from his powerful letters and journals tells the story from the inside, in Byron's own racy and passionate style. Though Byron is chiefly known as a poet, his letters and journals are one of the glories of English prose literature,and one of the greatest British acts of autobiography, alongside Pepys' Diary and Boswell's Journal. This new selection, taken from the
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR107 -- .B976 2015eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2033558 Available EBL2033558

Alongside Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters, and Oscar Wilde, Lord Byron possesses a star-quality unlike other classic British authors. His life as poet, philanderer, homosexual, and freedom fighter is legendary, and this new selection from his powerful letters and journals tells the story from the inside, in Byron's own racy and passionate style. Though Byron is chiefly known as a poet, his letters and journals are one of the glories of English prose literature,and one of the greatest British acts of autobiography, alongside Pepys' Diary and Boswell's Journal. This new selection, taken from the

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Byron--never one to suffer a hasty letter--once reprimanded a friend for his perfunctory missive: "When you write don't write such damned scraps of letters." He followed the golden rule of correspondence, bestowing on his friends and acquaintances the kind of letters anyone would be gratified to receive. Working from Marchand's definitive edition of the letters (Byron's Letters and Journals), published between 1973 and 1982, Lansdown (James Cook Univ.) has achieved a remarkable feat of distillation. His "new selection" judiciously reduces Marchand's 12 volumes to a manageable narrative without sacrificing Byron's brilliant mélange of wit, candor, and affectation. Drawing from what he calls "the most entertaining and engrossing private documents in the language," Lansdown offers a vivid chronicle of Byron's life: his formative tour of the Mediterranean, his meteoric rise to literary fame, and his unfortunate marriage and consequent exile. Scattered throughout are Byron's reflections on his various amours, his financial woes, and his astonishing poetic productivity. In Don Juan, Byron described the rich liquid lodged at the center of a frozen bottle of champagne as "the whole spirit brought to a quintessence." Readers will find Lansdown's new selection equally representative and intoxicating. Summing Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. --Jacob Risinger, The Ohio State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Richard Lansdown took his bachelor's and doctoral degrees at University College, London. After two years teaching literature in Finland he moved to Australia, where he has taught in New South Wales and Tropical North Queensland, where he still lives and works. He has written two other studies of Lord Byron, and numerous articles on Romantic and Nineteenth-Century literature.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.