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Culture and Propaganda : The Progressive Origins of American Public Diplomacy, 1936-1953

By: Graham, Sarah Ellen, Dr.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: : Ashgate Publishing Ltd, 2015Description: 1 online resource (284 p.).ISBN: 9781472459039.Subject(s): Cold War | Diplomatic and consular service, American | Politics and culture | Propaganda, American -- History -- 20th century | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1933-1945 | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1945-1953 | United States -- Foreign relations administration | United States. Foreign ServiceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Culture and Propaganda : The Progressive Origins of American Public Diplomacy, 1936-1953DDC classification: 327.73009/044 | 327.73009''044 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1 “Let�s Not Be Suckers Again.�Propaganda Analysis, Philanthropy, and American Foreign Relations between the World Wars""; ""2 “Enlightened and Far-Sighted Leadership.�Cultural Diplomacy: Latin American Precedents and Wartime Expansion""; ""3 Journalist or Diplomat? Wartime Broadcasting at the Voice of America""; ""4 “A Forum is also a Battleground: �The Founding of Unesco""; ""5 The Limits of Reciprocity: Cultural Diplomacy in the Post-War World Order""
""6 “Threats to Our Virtue: �Propaganda, Information and the Cold War""""7 Cultural Democracy and the Iron Curtain: Unesco, Multilateralism and the Cold War""; ""Conclusion""; ""Bibliography""; ""Index""
Summary: Throughout the twentieth century governments came to increasingly appreciate the value of soft power to help them achieve their foreign policy ambitions. Covering the crucial period between 1936 and 1953, this book examines the U.S. government's adoption of diplomatic programs that were designed to persuade, inform, and attract global public opinion in support of American national interests. Cultural diplomacy and international information were deeply controversial to an American public that been bombarded with propaganda during the First World War. This book explains how new notions of propa
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JZ1480.A5 G73 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2110636 Available EBL2110636

""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""1 “Let�s Not Be Suckers Again.�Propaganda Analysis, Philanthropy, and American Foreign Relations between the World Wars""; ""2 “Enlightened and Far-Sighted Leadership.�Cultural Diplomacy: Latin American Precedents and Wartime Expansion""; ""3 Journalist or Diplomat? Wartime Broadcasting at the Voice of America""; ""4 “A Forum is also a Battleground: �The Founding of Unesco""; ""5 The Limits of Reciprocity: Cultural Diplomacy in the Post-War World Order""

""6 “Threats to Our Virtue: �Propaganda, Information and the Cold War""""7 Cultural Democracy and the Iron Curtain: Unesco, Multilateralism and the Cold War""; ""Conclusion""; ""Bibliography""; ""Index""

Throughout the twentieth century governments came to increasingly appreciate the value of soft power to help them achieve their foreign policy ambitions. Covering the crucial period between 1936 and 1953, this book examines the U.S. government's adoption of diplomatic programs that were designed to persuade, inform, and attract global public opinion in support of American national interests. Cultural diplomacy and international information were deeply controversial to an American public that been bombarded with propaganda during the First World War. This book explains how new notions of propa

Description based upon print version of record.

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