Who Freed the Slaves? : The Fight over the Thirteenth Amendment

By: Richards, Leonard LMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (317 p.)ISBN: 9780226208947Subject(s): Ashley, James Mitchell, -- 1824-1896 | Slavery -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United States -- History -- 19th century | United States. -- Constitution. -- 13th Amendment -- History | United States. -- President (1861-1865 : Lincoln). -- Emancipation ProclamationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Who Freed the Slaves? : The Fight over the Thirteenth AmendmentDDC classification: 342.7308/7 LOC classification: KF4545.S5 -- .R53 2015ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Prologue: Wednesday, June 15, 1864""; ""Chapter One: The Old Order and Its Defenders""; ""Chapter Two: Lincoln and Emancipation""; ""Chapter Three: To a White and Black Man�s War""; ""Chapter Four: The Odd Couple""; ""Chapter Five: Hostility of the Northern Democracy""; ""Chapter Six: The Lame Ducks of 1864""; ""Chapter Seven: The Enforcement Clause and Its Enemies""; ""Epilogue: Emancipation Day, 1893""; ""Appendix A: Significant Events Leading to the Thirteenth Amendment""; ""Appendix B: A Historiographical Note""; ""Notes""; ""Index""
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KF4545.S5 -- .R53 2015eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3038728 Available EBL3038728

""Contents""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Prologue: Wednesday, June 15, 1864""; ""Chapter One: The Old Order and Its Defenders""; ""Chapter Two: Lincoln and Emancipation""; ""Chapter Three: To a White and Black Man�s War""; ""Chapter Four: The Odd Couple""; ""Chapter Five: Hostility of the Northern Democracy""; ""Chapter Six: The Lame Ducks of 1864""; ""Chapter Seven: The Enforcement Clause and Its Enemies""; ""Epilogue: Emancipation Day, 1893""; ""Appendix A: Significant Events Leading to the Thirteenth Amendment""; ""Appendix B: A Historiographical Note""; ""Notes""; ""Index""

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Historian Richards (The California Gold Rush and the Coming of the Civil War) takes the reader behind the scenes of Washington politics to show how radical Republicans led by Ohio abolitionist and congressman James Ashley pushed for a constitutional amendment to end slavery outright. With telling detail on the dynamics and personalities making policy, he shifts the focus from Abraham Lincoln to Congress, African American soldiers, and state and local leaders who wrestled with various proposals to move against slavery, recruit African Americans into the army, consider civil rights, and remake America-or resist all such efforts. In Richards's rendering, Lincoln is less the author than the sometimes reluctant agent of emancipation, and the radicals are the tireless and resourceful heroes willing to make deals to get their way. VERDICT For those who saw the movie Lincoln, this book provides the substance of the real drama that played out over several years, culminating in the 13th Amendment, which ended legal slavery in the United States. It also provides a perceptive explanation as to how and why the promise of the 13th Amendment as an instrument for civil rights never came to fruition. In doing so, it reminds us that freedom is not a given; principled, pragmatic, and persistent advocates must work to realize and secure it.-Randall M. Miller, St. -Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Richards (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst), author of influential accounts of anti-abolitionist mobs and slave power nationally, such as The Slave Power (CH, May'01, 38-5182), narrates the forgotten story of the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery. He explains how this Congressional initiative, which failed by 93 to 65 votes on June 15, 1864, subsequently passed by 119 to 56 votes on January 31, 1865. Chapters 4 through 7 (the book's kernel) explicate how tenacious warriors who cherished the Union, opposed slavery, and despised the Confederacy gradually beat down pugnacious adversaries from the border states, northern Democracy, and Lincoln's cabinet. Congressman James M. Ashley from Toledo, Ohio, is the unsung hero. His importance was recognized first by the Nashville chapter of the Afro-American League during the 1890s (epilogue.) The Thirteenth Amendment transformed the law of the nation and ended the political and legal power of slaveholders nationally. In crisp prose and through selective research in federal, state, and legal records, Richards showcases this important constitutional development while challenging both the nationalist myth of the Great Emancipator as well as the anti-racist credentials of anti-slavery proponents. The book should meet students' intellectual curiosity, hopefully piqued by Steven Spielberg's movie Lincoln. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --Jeffrey R. Kerr-Ritchie, Howard University

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