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At the Violet Hour : Modernism and Violence in England and Ireland

By: Cole, Sarah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Modernist Literature and Culture: Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, USA, 2012Description: 1 online resource (392 p.).ISBN: 9780199995837.Subject(s): English literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | English literature -- Irish authors -- History and criticism | Modernism (Literature) -- Great Britain | Violence in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: At the Violet Hour : Modernism and Violence in England and IrelandDDC classification: 820.93552 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Series Editors� Foreword""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""Violence and Form""; ""Power, Force, Political Violence""; ""Confronting War, Imagining History""; ""Chapters""; ""1. Enchanted and Disenchanted Violence""; ""The Waste Land""; ""2. Dynamite Violence: From Melodrama to Menace""; ""Imagining Revolutionaries and their Acts""; ""Explosion and Melodrama: The Secret Agent""; ""Dynamite and the Future""; ""3. Cyclical Violence: The Irish Insurrection and the Limits of Enchantment""; ""The Long Past: Keening""; ""The Rising: Generative Violence""
""The Years of War: Reprisal""""Past, Present, Future: Architectural Allegory""; ""4. Patterns of Violence: Virginia Woolf in the 1930s""; ""Theorizing Violence in the 1930s""; ""The Spanish Civil War""; ""Action and Pacifism""; ""Virginia Woolf""; ""Early Patterns: The Voyage Out""; ""The 1920s: Jacob�s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse""; ""Overwhelming Force: The Years, Three Guineas, Between the Acts""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""; ""Works Cited""; ""Index""; ""A""; ""B""; ""C""; ""D""; ""E""; ""F""; ""G""; ""H""; ""I""; ""J""; ""K""; ""L""; ""M""; ""N""; ""O""; ""P""; ""Q""; ""R""
""S""""T""; ""U""; ""V""; ""W""; ""Y""; ""Z""
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR478.V56.C65 2012eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3054995 Available EBL3054995

""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Series Editors� Foreword""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""Violence and Form""; ""Power, Force, Political Violence""; ""Confronting War, Imagining History""; ""Chapters""; ""1. Enchanted and Disenchanted Violence""; ""The Waste Land""; ""2. Dynamite Violence: From Melodrama to Menace""; ""Imagining Revolutionaries and their Acts""; ""Explosion and Melodrama: The Secret Agent""; ""Dynamite and the Future""; ""3. Cyclical Violence: The Irish Insurrection and the Limits of Enchantment""; ""The Long Past: Keening""; ""The Rising: Generative Violence""

""The Years of War: Reprisal""""Past, Present, Future: Architectural Allegory""; ""4. Patterns of Violence: Virginia Woolf in the 1930s""; ""Theorizing Violence in the 1930s""; ""The Spanish Civil War""; ""Action and Pacifism""; ""Virginia Woolf""; ""Early Patterns: The Voyage Out""; ""The 1920s: Jacob�s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse""; ""Overwhelming Force: The Years, Three Guineas, Between the Acts""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""; ""Works Cited""; ""Index""; ""A""; ""B""; ""C""; ""D""; ""E""; ""F""; ""G""; ""H""; ""I""; ""J""; ""K""; ""L""; ""M""; ""N""; ""O""; ""P""; ""Q""; ""R""

""S""""T""; ""U""; ""V""; ""W""; ""Y""; ""Z""

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cole (Columbia Univ.) combines formal and historical analyses to explore modernism's relentless engagement with violence. For Cole, modernism is caught between opposing ways of understanding violence, which she names "enchanted" and "disenchanted." In the former, violence is generative, sublime; in the latter, it is unredeemable, sheer waste. WW I poetry (not least, T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land) provides Cole with her initial illustration of these intertwined modes; the disenchanted refusal of idealization generates enchanted ways of thinking and acting. The author develops this theoretical paradigm by considering canonical literary responses to exemplary manifestations of violence in the period, e.g., Conrad's The Secret Agent and late-19th-century anarchism; works by J. M. Synge, Sean O'Casey, and W. B. Yeats and events around the Irish Easter "Rising"; Virginia Woolf's late work and the rise of fascism. Cole argues that violence demands a "creative reckoning." The problem incited by that reckoning--how to acknowledge violence without extolling it--finds its most incisive formulation in Woolf. Whereas the prevailing rhetoric contested violence by embracing it, Woolf acknowledged violence by dispersing it, specifically by refiguring it as pattern. Cole's well-written, formidably researched book is a treasure trove of incisive readings that will surely become a classic. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. Stuber Hendrix College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sarah Cole is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and the author of Modernism, Male Friendship, and the First World War.

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