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How It Feels to Be Free : Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights Movement

By: Feldstein, Ruth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, USA, 2013Description: 1 online resource (305 p.).ISBN: 9780199718276.Subject(s): African American women entertainers -- Political activity -- History -- 20th century | African American women political activists -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 20th century | African Americans -- Music -- Political aspects -- History -- 20th century | Performing arts -- Political aspects -- United States -- 20th century | United States -- Race relations -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: How It Feels to Be Free : Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights MovementDDC classification: 791.092396073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Introduction: Performing Civil Rights""; ""1. “The World Was on Fire�: Making New York City Subcultures""; ""2. “Africa�s Musical Ambassador�: Miriam Makeba and the “Voice of Africa� in the United States""; ""3. “More Than Just a Jazz Performer�: Nina Simone�s Border Crossings""; ""4. “No One Asks Me What I Want�: Abbey Lincoln, Diahann Carroll, and the Promise of Integration in Popular Culture""; ""5. “So Beautiful in Those Rags�: Cicely Tyson, Popular Culture, and African American History in the 1970s""; ""Epilogue""
""Acknowledgments""""Notes""; ""Index""; ""A""; ""B""; ""C""; ""D""; ""E""; ""F""; ""G""; ""H""; ""I""; ""J""; ""K""; ""L""; ""M""; ""N""; ""O""; ""P""; ""Q""; ""R""; ""S""; ""T""; ""U""; ""V""; ""W""; ""X""; ""Y""; ""Z""
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.86 -- .F4342 2013eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3055847 Available EBL3055847

""Cover""; ""Contents""; ""Introduction: Performing Civil Rights""; ""1. “The World Was on Fire�: Making New York City Subcultures""; ""2. “Africa�s Musical Ambassador�: Miriam Makeba and the “Voice of Africa� in the United States""; ""3. “More Than Just a Jazz Performer�: Nina Simone�s Border Crossings""; ""4. “No One Asks Me What I Want�: Abbey Lincoln, Diahann Carroll, and the Promise of Integration in Popular Culture""; ""5. “So Beautiful in Those Rags�: Cicely Tyson, Popular Culture, and African American History in the 1970s""; ""Epilogue""

""Acknowledgments""""Notes""; ""Index""; ""A""; ""B""; ""C""; ""D""; ""E""; ""F""; ""G""; ""H""; ""I""; ""J""; ""K""; ""L""; ""M""; ""N""; ""O""; ""P""; ""Q""; ""R""; ""S""; ""T""; ""U""; ""V""; ""W""; ""X""; ""Y""; ""Z""

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Seeking to emphasize the importance of popular entertainment to the narrative of the civil rights movement, Feldstein (history, Rutgers Univ.; Motherhood in Black and White) considers the impact that a group of black female entertainers brought to the campaign. With analysis grounded in the legacy of Lena Horne as the first crossover black female entertainer in American popular culture, Feldstein argues that Horne's move into civil rights activism in 1963 provides the turning point for five other prominent black female entertainers-Nina Simone, Miriam Makeba, Abbey Lincoln, Diahann Carroll, and Cicely Tyson-to engage that legacy and use it to form their own identities as political performers. Close analysis of the women's performances highlight the ways in which the intersection of race and gender was at the core of their activism and the reception of their message to a public that by turns embraced and shunned them. Verdict This book fills a narrow gap left by other biographies of black female performers, providing a direct link between the development of the civil rights movement and the role of these particular women within it. Fans of late 20th-century American history and popular culture and readers in African American studies will find this an captivating read.-Kathryn Wells, Providence P.L. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Feldstein (Rutgers) considers "the centrality of popular culture to black activism, and to the ways in which black activism and feminism developed across borders and in conversation with each other." In the book's five chapters--breezily written but carefully researched through secondary materials--the author examines career choices and media response to celebrity black women working in the civil rights era. She offers close readings of Miriam Makeba's brief appearance in the film Come Back Africa and the impact of the South African singer's presence as a "repository for the meanings of Africa" in the US; Nina Simone's performances of "Pirate Jenny," "Go Limp," and "Four Women" in terms of "black power perspectives that were free of misogyny and claimed black women's experiences as relevant"; Abbey Lincoln's representational force in the film For Love of Ivy, exemplified by the politics of hairstyles (Afro versus straightened wig) the singer wore onscreen and off; and Cicely Tyson's age- and class-based breakthrough portrayals in Sounder (1972) and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1974). The sixth woman, Diahann Carroll, is mentioned throughout (though she does not receive sustained consideration). Lacking is in-depth discussion of the art-making processes that brought these women cultural prominence. --Thomas F. DeFrantz, Duke University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Ruth Feldstein is Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University, Newark. She is the author of Motherhood in Black and White: Race and Sex in American Liberalism, 1930-1965.

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