Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry.

By: Trinacty, Christopher VMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Cary : Oxford University Press, USA, 2014Description: 1 online resource (273 p.)ISBN: 9780199356577Subject(s): Intertextuality | Latin poetry -- History and criticism | Seneca, Lucius Annaeus, -- approximately 4 B.C.-65 A.D. -- Criticism and interpretationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan PoetryDDC classification: 872/.01 LOC classification: PA6685 -- .T756 2014ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Cover""; ""Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry""; ""Copyright""; ""CONTENTS""; ""ACKNOWLEDGMENTS""; ""Introduction""; ""Roman Tragedy and Senecan Tragedy""; ""Why Tragedy?""; ""The Epistulae Morales as Literary Criticism""; ""Intertextuality and Interpretation""; ""Intertextuality and Genre""; ""Intertextual Excursus""; ""Overview""; ""1: Seneca the Reader""; ""Multiple Perspectives, Multiple Readings""; ""Disease and Grim Old Age: Tragic Scenes of the Underworld""; ""Self-Fashioning and Literary Mimicry""; ""Rainbows and Knowledge: Interpreting Ovid�s Tapestries""
""Otium and the Eclogues""""Conclusions: Quotation and Intertext""; ""2: Intertextuality and Character""; ""Seneca and Ovid""; ""Phaedra""; ""Phaedra�s Remedia Amoris?""; ""Change of Heart (Phd. 274�357)""; ""Multiple Phaedras""; ""Medea, Myrrha, Byblis, and Phaedra""; ""Hero(id)es and Villains""; ""Seneca�s Medea""; ""Ovid�s Medea: The Metamorphoses and Heroides""; ""Seneca�s Medea: Mother and Wife (Love and Marriage)""; ""Seneca�s Medea: Mother and Wife (Becoming “Medea�)""; ""Seneca�s Medea as Witch""; ""Seneca�s Medea: A new Medea?""; ""3: Intertextuality and Plot""
""Prologue Speakers""""Juno Furens""; ""Oedipus� Plague""; ""Oedipus� Sphinx""; ""Choral Songs""; ""How Troy Falls: The Captive Chorus of Agamemnon and Carm. 3.3""; ""Eternal Death?: Carm. 3.30 in Troy""; ""Versions of Orpheus: Reading Carm. 1.12 with Medea and Hercules""; ""The Limits of Horatian Choral Lyric?: Carm. 1.3 and Vergil""; ""Messenger Speeches""; ""The Return of Achilles""; ""The Messenger Speech of the PhaedraIf""; ""The Epic Messenger""; ""Conclusion""; ""4: Intertextuality, Writers, and Readers""; ""Seneca�s Georgics""; ""Vergil�s Medea and Oedipus""; ""Ars Tragica""
""Intertextuality and Metapoetics""""Cassandra as (Falsa?) Vates""; ""Oedipus the Reader""; ""Necromancy""; ""Conclusion""; ""Epilogue""; ""BIBLIOGRAPHY""; ""INDEX OF PASSAGES""; ""SUBJECT INDEX""
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PA6685 -- .T756 2014eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3056192 Available EBL3056192

""Cover""; ""Senecan Tragedy and the Reception of Augustan Poetry""; ""Copyright""; ""CONTENTS""; ""ACKNOWLEDGMENTS""; ""Introduction""; ""Roman Tragedy and Senecan Tragedy""; ""Why Tragedy?""; ""The Epistulae Morales as Literary Criticism""; ""Intertextuality and Interpretation""; ""Intertextuality and Genre""; ""Intertextual Excursus""; ""Overview""; ""1: Seneca the Reader""; ""Multiple Perspectives, Multiple Readings""; ""Disease and Grim Old Age: Tragic Scenes of the Underworld""; ""Self-Fashioning and Literary Mimicry""; ""Rainbows and Knowledge: Interpreting Ovid�s Tapestries""

""Otium and the Eclogues""""Conclusions: Quotation and Intertext""; ""2: Intertextuality and Character""; ""Seneca and Ovid""; ""Phaedra""; ""Phaedra�s Remedia Amoris?""; ""Change of Heart (Phd. 274�357)""; ""Multiple Phaedras""; ""Medea, Myrrha, Byblis, and Phaedra""; ""Hero(id)es and Villains""; ""Seneca�s Medea""; ""Ovid�s Medea: The Metamorphoses and Heroides""; ""Seneca�s Medea: Mother and Wife (Love and Marriage)""; ""Seneca�s Medea: Mother and Wife (Becoming “Medea�)""; ""Seneca�s Medea as Witch""; ""Seneca�s Medea: A new Medea?""; ""3: Intertextuality and Plot""

""Prologue Speakers""""Juno Furens""; ""Oedipus� Plague""; ""Oedipus� Sphinx""; ""Choral Songs""; ""How Troy Falls: The Captive Chorus of Agamemnon and Carm. 3.3""; ""Eternal Death?: Carm. 3.30 in Troy""; ""Versions of Orpheus: Reading Carm. 1.12 with Medea and Hercules""; ""The Limits of Horatian Choral Lyric?: Carm. 1.3 and Vergil""; ""Messenger Speeches""; ""The Return of Achilles""; ""The Messenger Speech of the PhaedraIf""; ""The Epic Messenger""; ""Conclusion""; ""4: Intertextuality, Writers, and Readers""; ""Seneca�s Georgics""; ""Vergil�s Medea and Oedipus""; ""Ars Tragica""

""Intertextuality and Metapoetics""""Cassandra as (Falsa?) Vates""; ""Oedipus the Reader""; ""Necromancy""; ""Conclusion""; ""Epilogue""; ""BIBLIOGRAPHY""; ""INDEX OF PASSAGES""; ""SUBJECT INDEX""

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Trinacty (Oberlin College) rehabilitates Seneca's dramas as poems employing techniques familiar from the Augustan poets. This approach is welcome since recent work has focused on how these tragedies embody Seneca's philosophy. The author explores Seneca's use of intertextuality, more specifically Augustan aemulatio, reference to earlier texts to rival or correct them. The study comprises four sections: "Seneca the Reader" (Seneca's reading habits as modeled in his philosophical writings), "Intertextuality and Character," "Intertextuality and Plot," and "Intertextuality, Writers, and Readers." Trinacty builds on Gian Biagio Conte's discussion of poetic memory in terms that presume familiarity with the approach and its practitioners. And although Trinacty translates all Latin, his argument depends on verbal parallels between Seneca's texts and his Augustan predecessors. The subtleties of this approach may elude readers without Latin. Arguments for individual intertexts are not equally convincing, but this detracts little from larger arguments that substantially advance appreciation of Seneca's poetics: Seneca's characters respond to earlier representations of themselves, Seneca uses tragedy as a universalizing discourse to outbid the Augustan poets' specific genres, and his protagonists emerge, Prospero-like, as poets who construct their own worlds. --Paul E. Ojennus, Whitworth University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher V. Trinacty is Assistant Professor of Classics at Oberlin College.

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