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Color-blind justice : Albion Tourgée and the quest for racial equality from the Civil War to Plessy v. Ferguson / Mark Elliott.

By: Elliott, Mark, 1969 September 23-.
Contributor(s): American Council of Learned Societies.
Material type: TextTextSeries: ACLS Humanities E-book.Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006Description: viii, 388 p. : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.Other title: Albion Tourgée and the quest for racial equality from the Civil War to Plessy v. Ferguson.Subject(s): Tourgée, Albion W., 1838-1905 | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- 19th century | Abolitionists -- United States -- History | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) | United States -- Race relations -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: No titleLOC classification: PS3088 | .E455 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
pt. I. The color-blind crusade. Judge Tourgée and the radical Civil War -- pt. II. The radical advance. The making of a radical individualist in Ohio's Western Reserve ; Citizen-soldier: manhood, and the meaning of liberty ; A radical Yankee in the Reconstruction South ; The unfinished revolution -- pt. III. The counterrevolution. The politics of remembering Reconstruction ; Radical individualism in the Gilded Age ; Beginning the Civil Rights Movement ; The rejection of color-blind citizenship: Plessy v. Ferguson ; The fate of color-blind citizenship.
In: ACLS Humanities E-BookURL: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/Summary: Civil War officer, Reconstruction "carpetbagger," best-selling novelist, and relentless champion of equal rights, Albion Tourgee battled his entire life for racial justice. Now, in this engaging biography, Mark Elliott offers an insightful portrait of a fearless lawyer, jurist, and writer, who fought for equality long after most Americans had abandoned the ideals of Reconstruction. Elliott provides a fascinating account of Tourgee's life, from his childhood in the Western Reserve region of Ohio (then a hotbed of abolitionism), to his years as a North Carolina judge during Reconstruction, to his memorable role as lead plaintiff's counsel in the landmark Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson. Tourgee's brief coined the phrase that justice should be "color-blind," and his career was one long campaign to made good on that belief. A redoubtable lawyer and an accomplished jurist, Tourgee wrote fifteen political novels, eight books of historical and social criticism, and several hundred newspaper and magazine articles that all told represent a mountain of dissent against the prevailing tide of racial oppression.
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PS3088 .E455 2006 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://hdl.handle.net/2027/heb.06240 Available heb.06240

Includes bibliographical references (p. [323]-374) and index.

pt. I. The color-blind crusade. Judge Tourgée and the radical Civil War -- pt. II. The radical advance. The making of a radical individualist in Ohio's Western Reserve ; Citizen-soldier: manhood, and the meaning of liberty ; A radical Yankee in the Reconstruction South ; The unfinished revolution -- pt. III. The counterrevolution. The politics of remembering Reconstruction ; Radical individualism in the Gilded Age ; Beginning the Civil Rights Movement ; The rejection of color-blind citizenship: Plessy v. Ferguson ; The fate of color-blind citizenship.

Civil War officer, Reconstruction "carpetbagger," best-selling novelist, and relentless champion of equal rights, Albion Tourgee battled his entire life for racial justice. Now, in this engaging biography, Mark Elliott offers an insightful portrait of a fearless lawyer, jurist, and writer, who fought for equality long after most Americans had abandoned the ideals of Reconstruction. Elliott provides a fascinating account of Tourgee's life, from his childhood in the Western Reserve region of Ohio (then a hotbed of abolitionism), to his years as a North Carolina judge during Reconstruction, to his memorable role as lead plaintiff's counsel in the landmark Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson. Tourgee's brief coined the phrase that justice should be "color-blind," and his career was one long campaign to made good on that belief. A redoubtable lawyer and an accomplished jurist, Tourgee wrote fifteen political novels, eight books of historical and social criticism, and several hundred newspaper and magazine articles that all told represent a mountain of dissent against the prevailing tide of racial oppression.

Electronic text and image data. Ann Arbor, Mich. : University of Michigan, Michigan Publishing, 2014. Includes both TIFF files and keyword searchable text. ([ACLS Humanities E-Book]) Mode of access: Intranet.

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