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Processor Description Languages.

By: Mishra, Prabhat.
Contributor(s): Dutt, Nikil.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Systems on Silicon: Publisher: Burlington : Elsevier Science, 2014Description: 1 online resource (433 p.).ISBN: 9780080558370.Subject(s): Computer systems | Computers | Embedded computer systems | Embedded computer systemsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Processor Description LanguagesDDC classification: 004.16 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Processor Description Languages Applications ; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Contributors; Preface; About the Editors; Chapter 1. Introduction to Architecture Description Languages; 1.1 What is an Architecture Description Language?; 1.2 ADLs and Other Languages; 1.3 Classification of Contemporary ADLs; 1.3.1 Content-based Classification of ADLs; 1.3.2 Objective-based Classification of ADLs; 1.4 ADLs: Past, Present, and Future; 1.5 Book Organization; References; Chapter 2. ADL-driven Methodologies for Design Automation of Embedded Processors
2.1 Design Space Exploration2.2 Retargetable Compiler Generation; 2.2.1 Retargetability Based on ADL Content; 2.2.2 Retargetability Based on Compiler Phases; 2.2.3 Retargetability Based on Architectural Abstractions; 2.3 Retargetable Simulator Generation; 2.3.1 Interpretive Simulation; 2.3.2 Compiled Simulation; 2.3.3 Mixed Approaches; 2.4 Architecture Synthesis; 2.4.1 Implementation Generation Using Processor Templates; 2.4.2 ADL-driven Implementation Generation; 2.5 Top-Down Validation; 2.5.1 Validation of ADL Specification; 2.5.2 Implementation Validation; 2.6 Conclusions; References
Chapter 3. MIMOLA-A Fully Synthesizable Language3.1 Introduction; 3.1.1 Origin of the Language; 3.1.2 Purpose of the Language; 3.1.3 Related Work: State of the Art in the Early Years; 3.1.4 Outline of This Chapter; 3.2 Salient Features of the Mimola Language; 3.2.1 Overall Structure of Description; 3.2.2 Declarations, Data Types, and Operations; 3.2.3 Program Definition; 3.2.4 Structure Definition; 3.2.5 Linking Behavior and Structure; 3.2.6 Putting Things Together; 3.3 Tools and Results; 3.3.1 Design Flow; 3.3.2 The Front-end and Internal Design Representations
3.3.3 Mapping to Register Transfers3.3.4 Simulation; 3.3.5 Architectural Synthesis; 3.3.6 Test Program Generation; 3.3.7 Code Generation; 3.3.8 Overall View of the Dependence among MSS Tools; 3.3.9 Designs Using MSS2; 3.4 Conclusions; 3.4.1 Evolution of Ideas and Directions; 3.4.2 What Went Wrong and What Went Right; 3.4.3 Summary; References; Chapter 4. nML: A Structural Processor Modeling Language for Retargetable Compilation and ASIP Design; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 The nML Processor Description Formalism; 4.3 A Structural Skeleton of the Processor; 4.3.1 Memories and Registers
4.3.2 Storage Aliases4.3.3 Transitory Storage; 4.3.4 Immediate Constants and Enumeration Types; 4.3.5 Functional Units; 4.4 Instruction-Set Grammar; 4.4.1 Breaking Down the Instruction Set: AND Rules and OR Rules; 4.4.2 The Grammar Attributes; 4.4.3 Synthesized Attributes; 4.4.4 Action Attribute; 4.4.5 Image Attribute; 4.4.6 Syntax Attribute; 4.4.7 Mode Rules and Value Attributes; 4.4.8 Inherited Attributes; 4.5 Pipeline Hazards: Stalls and Bypasses; 4.5.1 Control Hazards; 4.5.2 Structural and Data Hazards; 4.6 The Evolution of nML; 4.7 A Retargetable Tool Suite for ASIPs
4.7.1 Chess: A Retargetable C Compiler
Summary: Efficient design of embedded processors plays a critical role in embedded systems design. Processor description languages and their associated specification, exploration and rapid prototyping methodologies are used to find the best possible design for a given set of applications under various design constraints, such as area, power and performance. <br><br>This book is the first, comprehensive survey of modern architecture description languages and will be an invaluable reference for embedded system architects, designers, developers, and validation engineers. Readers will see that the use of
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
TK7895.E42 P75 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=404983 Available EBL404983

Front Cover; Processor Description Languages Applications ; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Contributors; Preface; About the Editors; Chapter 1. Introduction to Architecture Description Languages; 1.1 What is an Architecture Description Language?; 1.2 ADLs and Other Languages; 1.3 Classification of Contemporary ADLs; 1.3.1 Content-based Classification of ADLs; 1.3.2 Objective-based Classification of ADLs; 1.4 ADLs: Past, Present, and Future; 1.5 Book Organization; References; Chapter 2. ADL-driven Methodologies for Design Automation of Embedded Processors

2.1 Design Space Exploration2.2 Retargetable Compiler Generation; 2.2.1 Retargetability Based on ADL Content; 2.2.2 Retargetability Based on Compiler Phases; 2.2.3 Retargetability Based on Architectural Abstractions; 2.3 Retargetable Simulator Generation; 2.3.1 Interpretive Simulation; 2.3.2 Compiled Simulation; 2.3.3 Mixed Approaches; 2.4 Architecture Synthesis; 2.4.1 Implementation Generation Using Processor Templates; 2.4.2 ADL-driven Implementation Generation; 2.5 Top-Down Validation; 2.5.1 Validation of ADL Specification; 2.5.2 Implementation Validation; 2.6 Conclusions; References

Chapter 3. MIMOLA-A Fully Synthesizable Language3.1 Introduction; 3.1.1 Origin of the Language; 3.1.2 Purpose of the Language; 3.1.3 Related Work: State of the Art in the Early Years; 3.1.4 Outline of This Chapter; 3.2 Salient Features of the Mimola Language; 3.2.1 Overall Structure of Description; 3.2.2 Declarations, Data Types, and Operations; 3.2.3 Program Definition; 3.2.4 Structure Definition; 3.2.5 Linking Behavior and Structure; 3.2.6 Putting Things Together; 3.3 Tools and Results; 3.3.1 Design Flow; 3.3.2 The Front-end and Internal Design Representations

3.3.3 Mapping to Register Transfers3.3.4 Simulation; 3.3.5 Architectural Synthesis; 3.3.6 Test Program Generation; 3.3.7 Code Generation; 3.3.8 Overall View of the Dependence among MSS Tools; 3.3.9 Designs Using MSS2; 3.4 Conclusions; 3.4.1 Evolution of Ideas and Directions; 3.4.2 What Went Wrong and What Went Right; 3.4.3 Summary; References; Chapter 4. nML: A Structural Processor Modeling Language for Retargetable Compilation and ASIP Design; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 The nML Processor Description Formalism; 4.3 A Structural Skeleton of the Processor; 4.3.1 Memories and Registers

4.3.2 Storage Aliases4.3.3 Transitory Storage; 4.3.4 Immediate Constants and Enumeration Types; 4.3.5 Functional Units; 4.4 Instruction-Set Grammar; 4.4.1 Breaking Down the Instruction Set: AND Rules and OR Rules; 4.4.2 The Grammar Attributes; 4.4.3 Synthesized Attributes; 4.4.4 Action Attribute; 4.4.5 Image Attribute; 4.4.6 Syntax Attribute; 4.4.7 Mode Rules and Value Attributes; 4.4.8 Inherited Attributes; 4.5 Pipeline Hazards: Stalls and Bypasses; 4.5.1 Control Hazards; 4.5.2 Structural and Data Hazards; 4.6 The Evolution of nML; 4.7 A Retargetable Tool Suite for ASIPs

4.7.1 Chess: A Retargetable C Compiler

Efficient design of embedded processors plays a critical role in embedded systems design. Processor description languages and their associated specification, exploration and rapid prototyping methodologies are used to find the best possible design for a given set of applications under various design constraints, such as area, power and performance. <br><br>This book is the first, comprehensive survey of modern architecture description languages and will be an invaluable reference for embedded system architects, designers, developers, and validation engineers. Readers will see that the use of

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