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Oracle High Performance Tuning for 9i and 10g.

By: Powell, Gavin JT.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Burlington : Elsevier Science, 2014Description: 1 online resource (774 p.).ISBN: 9780080513294.Subject(s): Computer files | Database management | Databases | Oracle (Computer file) | Relational databasesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Oracle High Performance Tuning for 9i and 10gDDC classification: 005 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Oracle® High Performance Tuning for 9i and 1og; Copyright Page; Contents; Contents at a glance; Preface; Introduction; A Tuning Environment; When to Tune; What to Tune in Production; When to Stop Tuning in Production; Tuning from Development to Production; How is this Book Organized?; Some Final Points; What is Oracle Database 10g?; Part I: Data Model Tuning; Chapter 1. The Relational Database Model; 1.1 A Layman's Approach to Normalization; 1.2 Referential Integrity; Chapter 2. Tuning the Relational Database Model; 2.1 Normalization and Tuning
2.2 Referential Integrity and Tuning2.3 Optimizing with Alternate Indexes; 2.4 Undoing Normalization; Chapter 3. Different Forms of the Relational Database Model; 3.1 The Purist's Relational Database Model; 3.2 Object Applications and the Relational Database Model; Chapter 4. A Brief History of Data Modeling; 4.1 The History of Data Modeling; 4.2 The History of Relational Databases; 4.3 The History of the Oracle Database; 4.4 The Roots of SQL; Part II: SQL Code Tuning; Chapter 5. What is SQL?; 5.1 DML and DDL; 5.2 DML Command Syntax; 5.3 Transaction Control; 5.4 Parallel Queries
Chapter 6. The Basics of Efficient SQL6.1 The SELECT Statement; 6.2 Using Functions; 6.3 Pseudocolumns; 6.4 Comparison Conditions; 6.5 Joins; 6.6 Using Subqueries for Efficiency; 6.7 Using Synonyms; 6.8 Using Views; 6.9 Temporary Tables; 6.10 Resorting to PL/SQL; 6.11 Replacing DELETE with TRUNCATE; 6.12 Object and Relational Conflicts; Chapter 7. Common Sense Indexing; 7.1 What and How to Index; 7.2 Types of Indexes; 7.3 Types of Indexes in Oracle Database; 7.4 Tuning BTree Indexes; 7.5 Summarizing Indexes; Chapter 8. Making SQL Efficient in Oracle Database; 8.1 What is the Parser?
8.2 What is the Optimizer?8.3 How Best to Access Data in the Database; 8.4 Rule- versus Cost-Based Optimization; 8.5 Data Access Methods; 8.6 Sorting; 8.7 Special Cases; 8.8 Overriding the Optimizer using Hints; Chapter 9. How to Find Problem Queries; 9.1 Tools to Detect Problems; 9.2 EXPLAIN PLAN; 9.3 SQL Trace and TKPROF; 9.4 10g TRCSESS; 9.5 Autotrace; 9.6 Oracle Database Performance Views for Tuning SQL; Chapter 10. Tuning SQL with Oracle Enterprise Manager; 10.1 The Tuning Pack; Part III: Physical and Configuration Tuning; Chapter 11. Installing Oracle and Creating a Database
11.1 Installing Oracle Database11.2 Basic Configuration; 11.3 Creating a Database; Chapter 12. Tuning Oracle Database File Structures; 12.1 Oracle Database Architecture and the Physical Layer; 12.2 Tuning and the Logical Layer; Chapter 13. Object Tuning; 13.1 Tables; 13.2 Indexes; 13.3 Index-Organized Tables and Clusters; 13.4 Sequences; 13.5 Synonyms and Views; 13.6 10g The Recycle Bin ; Chapter 14. Low-Level Physical Tuning; 14.1 What is the High Water Mark?; 14.2 Space Used in a Database; 14.3 What are Row Chaining and Row Migration?; 14.4 Different Types of Objects
14.5 How Much Block and Extent Tuning?
Summary: There are three parts to tuning an Oracle database: data modeling, SQL code tuning and physical database configuration.<br><br>A data model contains tables and relationships between tables. Tuning a data model involves normalization and de-normalization. Different approaches are required depending on the application, such as OLTP or a Data Warehouse. Inappropriate database design can make SQL code impossible to tune. Poor data modeling can have a most profound effect on database performance since all SQL code is constructed from the data model. <br><br>Poorly written SQL code is often a culpri
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QA76.76.M54 -- .S55 1995 Open Client/Server Computing and Middleware. QA76.76.M54.E895 2017 Introduction to Middleware : QA76.76.M54 S566 2014 Open Client/Server Computing and Middleware. QA76.76.O6 | QA76.9 .D3 P685 2003 Oracle High Performance Tuning for 9i and 10g. QA76.76.O6 | QA76.76.O63 F5972 2001 NetWare Administration : QA76.76 .O63 Ubuntu Linux Toolbox. QA76.76.O63 Linux for embedded and real-time applications /

Front Cover; Oracle® High Performance Tuning for 9i and 1og; Copyright Page; Contents; Contents at a glance; Preface; Introduction; A Tuning Environment; When to Tune; What to Tune in Production; When to Stop Tuning in Production; Tuning from Development to Production; How is this Book Organized?; Some Final Points; What is Oracle Database 10g?; Part I: Data Model Tuning; Chapter 1. The Relational Database Model; 1.1 A Layman's Approach to Normalization; 1.2 Referential Integrity; Chapter 2. Tuning the Relational Database Model; 2.1 Normalization and Tuning

2.2 Referential Integrity and Tuning2.3 Optimizing with Alternate Indexes; 2.4 Undoing Normalization; Chapter 3. Different Forms of the Relational Database Model; 3.1 The Purist's Relational Database Model; 3.2 Object Applications and the Relational Database Model; Chapter 4. A Brief History of Data Modeling; 4.1 The History of Data Modeling; 4.2 The History of Relational Databases; 4.3 The History of the Oracle Database; 4.4 The Roots of SQL; Part II: SQL Code Tuning; Chapter 5. What is SQL?; 5.1 DML and DDL; 5.2 DML Command Syntax; 5.3 Transaction Control; 5.4 Parallel Queries

Chapter 6. The Basics of Efficient SQL6.1 The SELECT Statement; 6.2 Using Functions; 6.3 Pseudocolumns; 6.4 Comparison Conditions; 6.5 Joins; 6.6 Using Subqueries for Efficiency; 6.7 Using Synonyms; 6.8 Using Views; 6.9 Temporary Tables; 6.10 Resorting to PL/SQL; 6.11 Replacing DELETE with TRUNCATE; 6.12 Object and Relational Conflicts; Chapter 7. Common Sense Indexing; 7.1 What and How to Index; 7.2 Types of Indexes; 7.3 Types of Indexes in Oracle Database; 7.4 Tuning BTree Indexes; 7.5 Summarizing Indexes; Chapter 8. Making SQL Efficient in Oracle Database; 8.1 What is the Parser?

8.2 What is the Optimizer?8.3 How Best to Access Data in the Database; 8.4 Rule- versus Cost-Based Optimization; 8.5 Data Access Methods; 8.6 Sorting; 8.7 Special Cases; 8.8 Overriding the Optimizer using Hints; Chapter 9. How to Find Problem Queries; 9.1 Tools to Detect Problems; 9.2 EXPLAIN PLAN; 9.3 SQL Trace and TKPROF; 9.4 10g TRCSESS; 9.5 Autotrace; 9.6 Oracle Database Performance Views for Tuning SQL; Chapter 10. Tuning SQL with Oracle Enterprise Manager; 10.1 The Tuning Pack; Part III: Physical and Configuration Tuning; Chapter 11. Installing Oracle and Creating a Database

11.1 Installing Oracle Database11.2 Basic Configuration; 11.3 Creating a Database; Chapter 12. Tuning Oracle Database File Structures; 12.1 Oracle Database Architecture and the Physical Layer; 12.2 Tuning and the Logical Layer; Chapter 13. Object Tuning; 13.1 Tables; 13.2 Indexes; 13.3 Index-Organized Tables and Clusters; 13.4 Sequences; 13.5 Synonyms and Views; 13.6 10g The Recycle Bin ; Chapter 14. Low-Level Physical Tuning; 14.1 What is the High Water Mark?; 14.2 Space Used in a Database; 14.3 What are Row Chaining and Row Migration?; 14.4 Different Types of Objects

14.5 How Much Block and Extent Tuning?

There are three parts to tuning an Oracle database: data modeling, SQL code tuning and physical database configuration.<br><br>A data model contains tables and relationships between tables. Tuning a data model involves normalization and de-normalization. Different approaches are required depending on the application, such as OLTP or a Data Warehouse. Inappropriate database design can make SQL code impossible to tune. Poor data modeling can have a most profound effect on database performance since all SQL code is constructed from the data model. <br><br>Poorly written SQL code is often a culpri

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