Crime Reconstruction.

By: Chisum, W. JerryContributor(s): Turvey, Brent EMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Saint Louis : Elsevier Science, 2014Edition: 2nd edDescription: 1 online resource (0 p.)ISBN: 9780123864611Subject(s): Crime | Criminal investigation | Criminal investigation | Forensic sciences | Forensic sciencesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Crime ReconstructionDDC classification: 363.25 LOC classification: HV8073 .C515 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Crime Reconstruction; Copyright; Contents; Foreword; Preface to the First Edition; A Holistic Approach to Crime Reconstruction; Origins: The Forensic Generalist; The Forensic Generalist Fades; Modern Crime Reconstruction; Holistic Crime Reconstruction; References; Preface; Acknowledgments; About the Authors; Section 1: The Forensic Examiner; Chapter 1: Forensic Science; Forensic science; Generalists vs. specialists; Forensic confusion: technicians and scientists; Crime reconstruction; Crime reconstruction as a scientific practice; Role strain: asserting scientific impartiality
SummaryQuestions; References; Chapter 2: A History of Crime Reconstruction; Dr. Joseph E. Bell (1837-1911); Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930); Dr. Johann (Hans) Baptist Gustav Gross (1847-1925); Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne (1843-1924); Dr. Edmond Locard (1872-1966); Edward Oscar Heinrich (1881-1953); Dr. Paul L. Kirk (1902-1970); The broader theme; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 3: Crime Reconstruction: Ethos and Ethics; Evidence, crime reconstruction, and ethos; Responsibilities of the reconstructionist; On being mistaken; Logic in crime reconstruction; Fallacies of logic
Beyond fallacy: skewed and erroneous reconstructionsA canon of ethical conduct for the crime reconstructionist; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 4: Observer Effects and Examiner Bias: Psychological Influences on the Forensic Examiner; The problem of objectivity; Cognitive psychology: a primer; Purpose; Observer effects; The third rail; Subjectivity and expectation in forensic science; Restructuring the public crime lab; Conclusion; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 5: Practice Standards for the Reconstruction of Crime; Oversimplification and occam's razor; Reducing bias
Permission to reflectCritical thinking; The scientific method; Science as falsification; Practice standards; Conclusion; Summary; Questions; References; Section 2: The Crime Scene; Chapter 6: Evidence Dynamics; Evidence dynamics; The assumption of integrity; Chain of custody; Secondary transfer; The crime scene; Forensic protocols; Victim and offender actions; Witness actions; Establishing scientific uncertainty: An evidence dynamics protocol; Evidence dynamics: The influence of future technologies; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 7: Crime Scene Investigation; Crime scenes
Crime scene processingFor the Reconstructionist; Victims and suspects; Reconstruction; Crime scene analysis; Forensic relevance; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 8: Methods of Crime Reconstruction; Crime reconstruction and experience; Reason, methods, and confidence; The role of evidence: reconstruction classifications; Creating timelines; Behavioral evidence analysis (BEA); The nature of reconstruction; Critical/creative thinking exercises; Answers-sort of; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 9: Staged Crime Scenes; Definitions; The literature; Ad hoc reconstruction
""Appears staged""
Summary: <i>Crime Reconstruction, Second Edition</i> is a working guide to the interpretation of physical evidence, designed for forensic generalists and those with multiple forensic specialties. It was developed to aid these forensic reconstructionists with the formulation of hypotheses and conclusions that stay within the known limits of forensic evidence. <i>Crime Reconstruction</i> begins with chapters on the history and ethics of crime reconstruction and then shifts to the more applied subjects of general reconstruction methods and practice standards. It concludes with chapters on courtroom condu
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HV8073 .C515 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=753100 Available EBL753100

Front Cover; Crime Reconstruction; Copyright; Contents; Foreword; Preface to the First Edition; A Holistic Approach to Crime Reconstruction; Origins: The Forensic Generalist; The Forensic Generalist Fades; Modern Crime Reconstruction; Holistic Crime Reconstruction; References; Preface; Acknowledgments; About the Authors; Section 1: The Forensic Examiner; Chapter 1: Forensic Science; Forensic science; Generalists vs. specialists; Forensic confusion: technicians and scientists; Crime reconstruction; Crime reconstruction as a scientific practice; Role strain: asserting scientific impartiality

SummaryQuestions; References; Chapter 2: A History of Crime Reconstruction; Dr. Joseph E. Bell (1837-1911); Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930); Dr. Johann (Hans) Baptist Gustav Gross (1847-1925); Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne (1843-1924); Dr. Edmond Locard (1872-1966); Edward Oscar Heinrich (1881-1953); Dr. Paul L. Kirk (1902-1970); The broader theme; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 3: Crime Reconstruction: Ethos and Ethics; Evidence, crime reconstruction, and ethos; Responsibilities of the reconstructionist; On being mistaken; Logic in crime reconstruction; Fallacies of logic

Beyond fallacy: skewed and erroneous reconstructionsA canon of ethical conduct for the crime reconstructionist; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 4: Observer Effects and Examiner Bias: Psychological Influences on the Forensic Examiner; The problem of objectivity; Cognitive psychology: a primer; Purpose; Observer effects; The third rail; Subjectivity and expectation in forensic science; Restructuring the public crime lab; Conclusion; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 5: Practice Standards for the Reconstruction of Crime; Oversimplification and occam's razor; Reducing bias

Permission to reflectCritical thinking; The scientific method; Science as falsification; Practice standards; Conclusion; Summary; Questions; References; Section 2: The Crime Scene; Chapter 6: Evidence Dynamics; Evidence dynamics; The assumption of integrity; Chain of custody; Secondary transfer; The crime scene; Forensic protocols; Victim and offender actions; Witness actions; Establishing scientific uncertainty: An evidence dynamics protocol; Evidence dynamics: The influence of future technologies; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 7: Crime Scene Investigation; Crime scenes

Crime scene processingFor the Reconstructionist; Victims and suspects; Reconstruction; Crime scene analysis; Forensic relevance; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 8: Methods of Crime Reconstruction; Crime reconstruction and experience; Reason, methods, and confidence; The role of evidence: reconstruction classifications; Creating timelines; Behavioral evidence analysis (BEA); The nature of reconstruction; Critical/creative thinking exercises; Answers-sort of; Summary; Questions; References; Chapter 9: Staged Crime Scenes; Definitions; The literature; Ad hoc reconstruction

""Appears staged""

<i>Crime Reconstruction, Second Edition</i> is a working guide to the interpretation of physical evidence, designed for forensic generalists and those with multiple forensic specialties. It was developed to aid these forensic reconstructionists with the formulation of hypotheses and conclusions that stay within the known limits of forensic evidence. <i>Crime Reconstruction</i> begins with chapters on the history and ethics of crime reconstruction and then shifts to the more applied subjects of general reconstruction methods and practice standards. It concludes with chapters on courtroom condu

Description based upon print version of record.

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