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Remaking History : The Past in Contemporary Historical Fictions

Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: : Taylor and Francis, 2015Description: 1 online resource (247 p.).ISBN: 9781317436188.Subject(s): Historical fiction -- History and criticism | History in literature | Literature and historyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Remaking History : The Past in Contemporary Historical FictionsDDC classification: 809.3/81 | 809.381 LOC classification: PN3441 .D44 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; FIGURES; Acknowledgements; Permissions; Introduction: Perverting history; Part I: Ethics, politics, and nationalism; 1 Reading and ethics; Trusting the historical novel; Wolf Hall and the 'double effect' of historical fiction; Historical fiction and ethics; War, blood, guts: Combat and violence in mass-market novels; 2 Challenging national histories; Discussion and origins: Jimmy's Hall; Disrupting pioneer myths: The Western; This Is England; Mad Men and the illusions of History; Part II: Haunting, ghostliness, and the undead
3 The materiality of the pastSmoking, pastness, and memory in historical film and television; Pursuing smoke; Smoking in Mad Men; Rings as things and non-things; Remnants and mourning; 4 The problem of time and the return of the dead; Horrible history; Shuffling into history: Zombies; Humanness and temporality: The vampire; Modern times; Time and magic and narrative: Hugo; Part III: Pleasure, affect, and performance; 5 Pleasure and desire; Enjoying popular history; Downton Abbey, escapism, and passivity; Costume and the self-conscious pleasure of the text; Misery programming
Laughing at the pastLost in Austen, the gaze, and the pleasures of the text; Historical exploitation; 6 Performance and affect; The Red Riding Trilogy, smoke, ethics, and performance; Anne Boleyn, drag history, and the body of the past; Hunger: Authenticity and abjection; Conclusions; Index
Summary: <P><EM>Remaking History </EM>considers the ways that historical fictions of all kinds enable a complex engagement with the past. Popular historical texts including films, television and novels, along with cultural phenomena such as superheroes and vampires, broker relationships to 'history', while also enabling audiences to understand the ways in which the past is written, structured and ordered.</P><P></P><P>Jerome de Groot uses examples from contemporary popular culture to show the relationship between fiction and history in two key ways. Firstly, the texts pedagogically contribute to the hi
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PN3441 .D44 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=2128986 Available EBL2128986

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; FIGURES; Acknowledgements; Permissions; Introduction: Perverting history; Part I: Ethics, politics, and nationalism; 1 Reading and ethics; Trusting the historical novel; Wolf Hall and the 'double effect' of historical fiction; Historical fiction and ethics; War, blood, guts: Combat and violence in mass-market novels; 2 Challenging national histories; Discussion and origins: Jimmy's Hall; Disrupting pioneer myths: The Western; This Is England; Mad Men and the illusions of History; Part II: Haunting, ghostliness, and the undead

3 The materiality of the pastSmoking, pastness, and memory in historical film and television; Pursuing smoke; Smoking in Mad Men; Rings as things and non-things; Remnants and mourning; 4 The problem of time and the return of the dead; Horrible history; Shuffling into history: Zombies; Humanness and temporality: The vampire; Modern times; Time and magic and narrative: Hugo; Part III: Pleasure, affect, and performance; 5 Pleasure and desire; Enjoying popular history; Downton Abbey, escapism, and passivity; Costume and the self-conscious pleasure of the text; Misery programming

Laughing at the pastLost in Austen, the gaze, and the pleasures of the text; Historical exploitation; 6 Performance and affect; The Red Riding Trilogy, smoke, ethics, and performance; Anne Boleyn, drag history, and the body of the past; Hunger: Authenticity and abjection; Conclusions; Index

<P><EM>Remaking History </EM>considers the ways that historical fictions of all kinds enable a complex engagement with the past. Popular historical texts including films, television and novels, along with cultural phenomena such as superheroes and vampires, broker relationships to 'history', while also enabling audiences to understand the ways in which the past is written, structured and ordered.</P><P></P><P>Jerome de Groot uses examples from contemporary popular culture to show the relationship between fiction and history in two key ways. Firstly, the texts pedagogically contribute to the hi

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

In this wide-ranging study, De Groot (English, Univ. of Manchester, UK) argues that historical fiction has an "uncanny" relationship to the past; that is, it is a genre that makes history simultaneously familiar and alien. Not confining his analysis to novels, De Groot also examines English-language film and television programs (Downton Abbey, Mad Men) to demonstrate how contemporary historical fiction is itself a form of historiography. These narratives engage self-consciously with their own truth- and myth-making about history. For example, in a chapter on the materiality of the past, De Groot argues that smoking is a particularly strong "index of pastness," given the unpopularity of cigarettes in contemporary US cultural and public heath discourse. Contemporary films, television programs, and novels that depict smoking call ironic attention to their significance as both representations of the past and as commentaries on how the past is represented. De Groot engages heavily with cultural theory, and thus some of his arguments will perplex less-experienced readers, but overall this is an important contribution to historical fiction studies. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Laura R. Braunstein, Dartmouth College

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