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Track Two Diplomacy in Theory and Practice.

By: Jones, Peter.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Redwood City : Stanford University Press, 2015Description: 1 online resource (256 p.).ISBN: 9780804796323.Subject(s): | | | | | | Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Track Two Diplomacy in Theory and PracticeDDC classification: 327.2 LOC classification: JZ1323.7 | J664 2015Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword, by George P. Shultz ; Preface; Introduction: Why This Book, What Is It About, and Who Is It For? ; Section I: In Theory ; 1. What Is Track Two Diplomacy?; 2. Theoretical Foundations of Track Two; 3. Where Theory Meets Practice; Section II: In Practice ; 4. On People: The Characteristics and Role of the Third Party ; 5. On Method: The Problem-Solving Workshop ; 6. On Impact: Transfer and the Evaluation of Track Two ; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
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JZ1323.7 J664 2015 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=3568969 Available EBL3568969

Contents; Foreword, by George P. Shultz ; Preface; Introduction: Why This Book, What Is It About, and Who Is It For? ; Section I: In Theory ; 1. What Is Track Two Diplomacy?; 2. Theoretical Foundations of Track Two; 3. Where Theory Meets Practice; Section II: In Practice ; 4. On People: The Characteristics and Role of the Third Party ; 5. On Method: The Problem-Solving Workshop ; 6. On Impact: Transfer and the Evaluation of Track Two ; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Track Two Diplomacy is a welcome addition to the international relations literature on several levels. In this well-written effort exploring the concept theoretically (from an international relations perspective) and in practice, Jones (Univ. of Ottawa) defines track two diplomacy in part as "unofficial dialogues between two antagonistic parties ... often facilitated by an impartial Third Party"; it is an underexplored practice in scholarly and policy literature. In the first theoretical chapter, Jones looks at track two diplomacy through the lens of the major theoretical paradigms in the study of international relations. If track two diplomacy is a tool of statecraft, it might have been better to center the theoretical grounding on the foreign policy analysis literature. Nonetheless, subsequent chapters present a rigorous examination of the practice that is a comprehensive characterization and a blueprint for practitioners of conduct of track two diplomacy. One wishes Jones had included more specific cases of track two diplomacy to further define what it is and illustrate the diversity of issues that exemplify the practice. This is welcome and overdue contribution to the field. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Jeffrey Fields, University of Southern California

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter Jones is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa, and an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

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