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"Trivial complaints" : the role of privacy in domestic violence law and activism in the U.S. / Kirsten S. Rambo.

By: Rambo, Kirsten S.
Contributor(s): American Council of Learned Societies.
Material type: TextTextSeries: ACLS Humanities E-book.ACLS Humanities E-Book: ; ACLS Gutenberg-e series: Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, c2009Description: 1 online resource : ill., facsims.ISBN: 0231509588 (e-book).Subject(s): Privacy, Right of -- United States -- History | Family violence -- Law and legislation -- United States -- History | Abused women -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: "Trivial complaints"Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Also available in print.
Contents:
Introduction -- Precursors to the battered women's movement -- The paradox of privacy for the battered women's movement -- From Bruno to Gonzales -- Privacy and domestic violence in same-sex relationships -- Conclusion.
In: ACLS Humanities E-BookURL: http://www.humanitiesebook.org/
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Electronic text (HTML), image date (JPEG) and audio clips (mp3).

Mode of access: Intranet.

Caption title; description based on screen of 2013-06-12.

"This title was originally published by Gutenberg-e: www.gutenberg-e.org."

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction -- Precursors to the battered women's movement -- The paradox of privacy for the battered women's movement -- From Bruno to Gonzales -- Privacy and domestic violence in same-sex relationships -- Conclusion.

Also available in print.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Rambo examines how conceptions of privacy have affected the history of domestic violence law and activism in the US. Rambo (executive director, Georgia Commission on Family Violence) focuses her attention primarily on domestic violence litigation, one of several ways in which her work complements existing accounts of social movements to combat domestic violence. Rambo shows how notions of privacy and their underlying assumptions have constrained battered women's advocates and how these advocates have attempted to subvert and transform existing models of privacy. This book is a thoughtful and accessible history of an important facet of a social movement, as well as a critical examination of the broader concept of privacy. The book is available in print and online at . The online presence links sections of the text to relevant court decisions, photographs, tables, and audio files of interviews. These online materials will be of particular use in teaching, although excerpted, rather than full, court decisions might have been more appropriate for undergraduates. This is, however, a minor quibble about an extraordinary book that will be of interest to scholars at all levels. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, upper-division undergraduate students, and above. E. Ackerman John Jay College/CUNY

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Kirsten S. Rambo is the executive director of the Georgia Commission on Family Violence and a former visiting assistant professor of women's studies at Emory University.

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