Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Confronting the War Machine : Draft Resistance during the Vietnam War

By: Foley, Michael S.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2003Description: 1 online resource (468 p.).ISBN: 9780807862438.Subject(s): Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Draft resisters -- United States | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Protest movements -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Confronting the War Machine : Draft Resistance during the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/38 LOC classification: DS559.8.D7 -- F65 2003Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction: Draft Resistance in American Memory; Notes; Part I. Toward a Movement; 1. A Little Band of Bold Pioneers; Sons of Liberty? 1740-1966; Pacifists' Progress, 1957-1966; America and Conscription, 1789-1965; "I Fought the Law, and the Law Won," March 1966 to March 1967; Notes; 2. The Draft as a Political Issue and a Movement Target; The Draft as a Political Issue; We Won't Go; Draft Reform?; The Boston Draft Resistance Group; The Early Morning Show and the Horror Show; Draft Counseling; Notes
3. October 16: A Resolute Show of Moral ForceSeeds of Resistance; Intellectual Roots and Debates on the Left; Planning October 16; Obedience to a Higher Allegiance; Notes; Part II. Confrontations and Misconceptions; 4. Filtered Resistance: Draft Resisters' Image and Reality; Inflammatory Images; Children of the American Dream; Notes; 5. Uneasy Waiting: Draft Resisters and the Johnson Administration; All the President's Men; Ner Meets FBI; The Selective Service Responds; Notes; 6. Getting by with a Little Help from their Friends; All in the Family; Unexpected Consequences; A Network of Support
BDRG and Resistance''Girls Say 'Yes' to Guys who Say 'No' ''; ''A Child has Spawned Parents''; November 16 and December 4; Notes; Section of Illustrations; Part III. Peaks, Valleys, and the Changing Horizon; 7. A New Beginning: Confrontation, Renewal, and Triumph; The Hammer Falls; Indictments as Catalyst; Refusing Induction; Howard Marston Jr.; James Oestereich and Richard Hughes; Ray Mungo; Worries in Washington; Sensing their Strength; Notes; 8. Spring 1968: A Hothouse Atmosphere; King's Death and a World Upside Down; Sanctuary at Arlington Street; The Spock Trial; Notes
9. Beyond Draft Resistance: New Strategies and Dangling MenSo, You Say You Want a Revolution; Hippies, Suburbanites, and High Schoolers; The GI Alliance; Support and Forgotten Draft Resisters; Notes; Epilogue; Nixon Takes Notice; Life after the Resistance; Looking Back; Notes; Appendix A: Tables; Appendix B: Statement on Methodology; Appendix C: Letter to Survey Recipients and Questionnaire; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A-B; C; D; E-F; G-H; I-K; L-N; O-Q; R-S; T-W; Y-Z
Summary: Shedding light on a misunderstood form of opposition to the Vietnam War, Michael Foley tells the story of draft resistance, the cutting edge of the antiwar movement at the height of the war's escalation. Unlike so-called draft dodgers, who left the country or manipulated deferments, draft resisters openly defied draft laws by burning or turning in their draft cards. Like civil rights activists before them, draft resisters invited prosecution and imprisonment.Focusing on Boston, one of the movement's most prominent centers, Foley reveals the crucial role of draft resisters in shifting antiwar sentiment from the margins of society to the center of American politics. Their actions inspired other draft-age men opposed to the war--especially college students--to reconsider their place of privilege in a draft system that offered them protections and sent disproportionate numbers of working-class and minority men to Vietnam. This recognition sparked the change of tactics from legal protest to mass civil disobedience, drawing the Johnson administration into a confrontation with activists who were largely suburban, liberal, young, and middle class--the core of Johnson's Democratic constituency.Examining the day-to-day struggle of antiwar organizing carried out by ordinary Americans at the local level, Foley argues for a more complex view of citizenship and patriotism during a time of war.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS559.8.D7 -- F65 2003 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=413280 Available EBL413280

Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction: Draft Resistance in American Memory; Notes; Part I. Toward a Movement; 1. A Little Band of Bold Pioneers; Sons of Liberty? 1740-1966; Pacifists' Progress, 1957-1966; America and Conscription, 1789-1965; "I Fought the Law, and the Law Won," March 1966 to March 1967; Notes; 2. The Draft as a Political Issue and a Movement Target; The Draft as a Political Issue; We Won't Go; Draft Reform?; The Boston Draft Resistance Group; The Early Morning Show and the Horror Show; Draft Counseling; Notes

3. October 16: A Resolute Show of Moral ForceSeeds of Resistance; Intellectual Roots and Debates on the Left; Planning October 16; Obedience to a Higher Allegiance; Notes; Part II. Confrontations and Misconceptions; 4. Filtered Resistance: Draft Resisters' Image and Reality; Inflammatory Images; Children of the American Dream; Notes; 5. Uneasy Waiting: Draft Resisters and the Johnson Administration; All the President's Men; Ner Meets FBI; The Selective Service Responds; Notes; 6. Getting by with a Little Help from their Friends; All in the Family; Unexpected Consequences; A Network of Support

BDRG and Resistance''Girls Say 'Yes' to Guys who Say 'No' ''; ''A Child has Spawned Parents''; November 16 and December 4; Notes; Section of Illustrations; Part III. Peaks, Valleys, and the Changing Horizon; 7. A New Beginning: Confrontation, Renewal, and Triumph; The Hammer Falls; Indictments as Catalyst; Refusing Induction; Howard Marston Jr.; James Oestereich and Richard Hughes; Ray Mungo; Worries in Washington; Sensing their Strength; Notes; 8. Spring 1968: A Hothouse Atmosphere; King's Death and a World Upside Down; Sanctuary at Arlington Street; The Spock Trial; Notes

9. Beyond Draft Resistance: New Strategies and Dangling MenSo, You Say You Want a Revolution; Hippies, Suburbanites, and High Schoolers; The GI Alliance; Support and Forgotten Draft Resisters; Notes; Epilogue; Nixon Takes Notice; Life after the Resistance; Looking Back; Notes; Appendix A: Tables; Appendix B: Statement on Methodology; Appendix C: Letter to Survey Recipients and Questionnaire; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A-B; C; D; E-F; G-H; I-K; L-N; O-Q; R-S; T-W; Y-Z

Shedding light on a misunderstood form of opposition to the Vietnam War, Michael Foley tells the story of draft resistance, the cutting edge of the antiwar movement at the height of the war's escalation. Unlike so-called draft dodgers, who left the country or manipulated deferments, draft resisters openly defied draft laws by burning or turning in their draft cards. Like civil rights activists before them, draft resisters invited prosecution and imprisonment.Focusing on Boston, one of the movement's most prominent centers, Foley reveals the crucial role of draft resisters in shifting antiwar sentiment from the margins of society to the center of American politics. Their actions inspired other draft-age men opposed to the war--especially college students--to reconsider their place of privilege in a draft system that offered them protections and sent disproportionate numbers of working-class and minority men to Vietnam. This recognition sparked the change of tactics from legal protest to mass civil disobedience, drawing the Johnson administration into a confrontation with activists who were largely suburban, liberal, young, and middle class--the core of Johnson's Democratic constituency.Examining the day-to-day struggle of antiwar organizing carried out by ordinary Americans at the local level, Foley argues for a more complex view of citizenship and patriotism during a time of war.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Foley (history, Staten Island Coll., CUNY) offers a scholarly investigation of the Boston-area draft resistance movement from 1966 to 1969. He focuses not on draft dodgers but on resisters, whose most dramatic and consequential form of protest was draft-card burning. The book includes stories about unknown resisters as well as famous ones, such as pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock and Yale University Chaplain William Sloane Coffin, both of whom were acquitted on appeal of encouraging young men to resist. The movement splintered in 1968 following the assassination of Martin Luther King, whose civil rights leadership was the model for the draft resistance. By 1969, the Boston movement had faded but left two important legacies: an alliance with angry servicemen who formed the veterans protest movement and a training ground for the emerging women's movement. Two fine related works are John Hagan's Northern Passage, which follows resisters who moved to Canada, and Gerald Nicosia's Home to War, which chronicles the veteran resistance movement. Strongly recommended for academic collections of peace studies or the Vietnam War era.-Karl Helicher, Upper Merion Twp. Lib., King of Prussia, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The main argument of this book is that draft resistance (not to be confused with draft dodging) deserves a more important role in the history of the 1960s and the anti-Vietnam War movement than it has previously been accorded. Foley (College of Staten Island/City University of New York) develops this position through a detailed, close-up examination of draft resistance in Boston, a national center of the movement. Beginning with isolated, individual acts during the early years of the war, draft resistance became a central part of the antiwar movement by 1967-68. The 1968 trial of the "Boston Five" (including, most famously, Dr. Benjamin Spock) for encouraging draft resistance was one of the highlights of the antiwar movement. Then, quite quickly and for a variety of reasons, the draft resistance movement fragmented and withered, and the New England Resistance ceased to exist in early 1969. Although Foley fails to make his main point on some counts, his book, based on numerous interviews with and surveys of participants, provides a thoughtful (and passionate) interpretation of the antiwar movement that is one of the best and most nuanced now available. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. K. Blaser Wayne State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael S. Foley is assistant professor of history at the City University of New York's College of Staten Island

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.